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Gibson Citation
The Gibson Citation was a top-of-the-line archtop guitar, introduced in 1969 by Gibson and still available (as of 27 July 2017) from the Gibson Custom Shop on special order.[1] It had a 17" full-depth body with figured maple back and sides and a carved maple or spruce top with fancy inlays. The neck was made of figured maple or mahogany. The Citation was typically equipped with a gold-covered floating BJB pickup, and was available in natural and sunburst finishes. Only about eight to ten Citation guitars were shipped during the original production run, which ended in 1971. Gibson reissued the Citation with the same specifications and features in 1979, and again discontinued it in 1983. In 1993, Gibson introduced another reissue of the Citation
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Archtop Guitar
An archtop guitar is a hollow steel-stringed acoustic or semi-acoustic guitar with a full body and a distinctive arched top, whose sound is particularly popular with jazz, blues, rockabilly and psychobilly guitarists. Typically, an archtop guitar has:6 strings An arched top and back, not a flat top and back A hollow body Moveable adjustable bridge F-holes similar to members of the violin family Rear mounted tailpiece, stoptail bridge or Bigsby tremolo 14th-fret neck joinContents1 History 2 Construction 3 Various use of the term archtop 4 Bass guitars 5 Other variations 6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksHistory[edit]A 1918 "The Gibson" acoustic guitar, with a 13th fret neck join, circular soundhole and floating bridge. This was a transitional model with no f-holes and a much smaller body than the classic archtop.The archtop guitar is often credited[1] to Orville Gibson, whose innovative designs led to the formation of the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Mfg
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Bass Guitar
The bass guitar[1] (also known as electric bass,[2][3][4] or bass) is a stringed instrument similar in appearance and construction to an electric guitar, but with a longer neck and scale length, and four to six strings or courses. The four-string bass is usually tuned the same as the double bass,[5] which corresponds to pitches one octave lower than the four lowest pitched strings of a guitar (E, A, D, and G).[6] The bass guitar is a transposing instrument, as it is notated in bass clef an octave higher than it sounds. It is played primarily with the fingers or thumb, by plucking, slapping, popping, strumming, tapping, thumping, or picking with a plectrum, often known as a pick
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Acoustic Guitar
An acoustic guitar is a guitar that produces sound acoustically by transmitting the vibration of the strings to the air—as opposed to relying on electronic amplification (see electric guitar). The sound waves from the strings of an acoustic guitar resonate through the guitar's body, creating sound. This typically involves the use of a sound board and a sound box to strengthen the vibrations of the strings. The main source of sound in an acoustic guitar is the string, which is plucked or strummed with the finger or with a pick. The string vibrates at a necessary frequency and also creates many harmonics at various different frequencies. The frequencies produced can depend on string length, mass, and tension
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Electric Guitar
An electric guitar is a guitar that uses one or more pickups to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals. The vibration occurs when a guitarist strums, plucks, fingerpicks, or taps the strings. The pickup used to sense the vibration generally uses electromagnetic induction to do so, though other technologies exist. In any case, the signal generated by an electric guitar is too weak to drive a loudspeaker, so it is sent to a guitar amplifier before being sent to the speaker, which converts it into audible sound. Since the output of an electric guitar is an electric signal, it can be electronically altered by to change the timbre of the sound
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Guitar
The guitar is a fretted musical instrument that usually has six strings.[1] The sound is projected either acoustically, using a hollow wooden or plastic and wood box (for an acoustic guitar), or through electrical amplifier and a speaker (for an electric guitar). It is typically played by strumming or plucking the strings with the fingers, thumb or fingernails of the right hand or with a pick while fretting (or pressing against the frets) the strings with the fingers of the left hand. The guitar is a type of chordophone, traditionally constructed from wood and strung with either gut, nylon or steel strings and distinguished from other chordophones by its construction and tuning
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Gibson L Series
The Gibson L series is a series of small-body guitars produced and sold by Gibson Guitar Corporation
Gibson Guitar Corporation
in the early 20th century. The first guitars of this series, Gibson L-0 and Gibson L-1, was introduced first as arch-tops (1902), and later as flat tops in 1926
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Les Paul
Lester William Polsfuss (June 9, 1915 – August 12, 2009), known as Les Paul, was an American jazz, country, and blues guitarist, songwriter, luthier, and inventor. He was one of the pioneers of the solid-body electric guitar. Paul taught himself how to play guitar, and while he is mainly known for jazz and popular music, he had an early career in country music.[1] He is credited with many recording innovations
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Gibson Hummingbird
The Gibson
Gibson
Hummingbird is an acoustic guitar model/series produced by the Gibson
Gibson
Guitar
Guitar
Corporation. Unlike the other flat-top Gibson
Gibson
acoustics, the Hummingbird was Gibson's first square-shoulder dreadnought, similar to the dreadnoughts produced by C.F. Martin & Company. Introduced in 1960, the Hummingbird was Gibson's second-most expensive acoustic guitar, behind the Gibson
Gibson
J-200, until the introduction of the Gibson Dove in 1962, (a blend between the Hummingbird and the J-200.) and has remained in production ever since
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Gibson RD
The Gibson RD series solid body electric guitars were launched in 1977. Distinguished by its active electronics (RD is the abbreviation for "research and development"[1]), they were designed to appeal to those interested in synthesizers as well as guitars. An "unhappy marriage of traditional and modern design", the series was unsuccessful,[2] though the concept of the RD was continued for a while in the Les Paul
Les Paul
Artist series.Contents1 History 2 RD Models 3 Model Demise 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The RD series (guitar and bass) was the result of Gibson's desire to tap into the developing synthesizer market, which was thought to have taken customers away from guitars.[3] The series had a longer scale (25½" as opposed to the more usual 24¾"; the bass guitar in the series had a 34½" scale), a maple body shaped somewhat like Gibson's Firebird and Explorer,[1] and state-of-the-art pre-amplified (active) electronics
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Gibson Sonex
The Sonex guitars were a range of budget Gibson electric guitars launched in 1980. They were made from a synthetic material called Resonwood, and manufactured with Multi-phonic body construction. There were four models: Deluxe, Standard, Custom and Artist.[1] They replaced the Marauder and S-1 guitars.[1] Like these two instruments, the Sonex took its styling from the Les Paul
Les Paul
guitars that had been popular for the previous decades, but using Resonwood instead of mahogany, bolt-on necks instead of set (glued-in) necks, and far less ornamentation.[2]Note: "The Sonex Multi-phonic™ body is composed of Resonwood surrounding an inner tone wood core. The tone wood core not only acts as the anchor point for the neck, it also adds acoustic resonance and exceptional body resilience
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Gibson Spirit
The Gibson Spirit
Gibson Spirit
was a guitar model sold under Gibson and Epiphone USA nameplates in the 1980s. This article does not refer to the made-in-China Spirit guitar sold under the Gibson Baldwin Music Education nameplate.Contents1 Origins 2 Models and variations2.1 "Spirit I" 2.2 "Spirit II" 2.3 "Spirit XPL" 2.4 The "SR-71": Spirit or not?3 Notable Spirits 4 Notable Spirit players 5 Picture gallery 6 ReferencesOrigins[edit] The Gibson Spirit
Gibson Spirit
is a lesser-known model produced from 1982 to 1986 by Gibson in the Nashville, Tennessee, and Kalamazoo, Michigan, factories. It was initially produced in the Kalamazoo factory under the Epiphone
Epiphone
nameplate. In response to poor sales, some Epiphone models were changed to Gibson, and a faint Epiphone
Epiphone
logo can be seen under the Gibson logo on the peghead. Later models were produced as Gibsons in Nashville
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Gibson 335-S
The Gibson 335-S was a solidbody version of their very popular Electric Spanish guitar, the ES-335. Although a very similar shape (though a little smaller), and with identical controls, being a solidbody rather than semi-acoustic guitar gave this model a rather different sound. The 335-S came in three varieties:335-S Deluxe: Mahogany
Mahogany
body and neck, bound ebony fingerboard, pearl inlaid headstock 335-S Custom: Mahogany
Mahogany
body and neck, unbound rosewood fingerboard 335-S Standard: Maple
Maple
body and neck, unbound rosewood fingerboardAll models were fitted with two humbucking pickups, and two volume and two tone controls
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Gibson EB-2
The Gibson EB-2
Gibson EB-2
is an electric bass guitar model produced by the Gibson Guitar Corporation
Gibson Guitar Corporation
from 1958 to 1972, with a hiatus from 1962 to 1963. When production ceased in 1972, a total of 8017 instruments has been built, with 2102 of them being EB-2D's.[1] Willie Moseley, in Vintage Guitar, referred to the bass guitar as possibly "Gibson's biggest bass invention"; the instrument, however, was not a great commercial success, and the Rivoli, the sister model made by Epiphone, may have been used more than the original Gibson.[2] Description[edit] Introduced in 1958, the EB-2 was the bass guitar equivalent of the popular Gibson ES-335. It featured a 335-style semi-hollow body, a short 30.5" scale neck and one large "Sidewinder" humbucking pickup in the neck position. The electronics consisted of a single volume and tone knob. The EB-2N had natural finish, the EB-2 sunburst
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Gibson J Series
The Gibson J series are a series of Jumbo acoustic guitars manufactured by Gibson Guitar
Guitar
Corporation. Series[edit]J-160E J-160 E VS Std J-180 J-185 J-185BKE J-90 Super Fusion J-15 J-25 J-35 J-30 J-45 J-50 J-60 J-60 Traditional J-60 Bonecrusher II J-100 J-150 Maple J-200 J-200 EC J-200 Custom Vine J-250 Monarch J-2000See also[edit]Gibson acoustic guitarsWikimedia Commons has media related to Gibson J.v t eGibson
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Gibson Dove
The Gibson Dove is a flattop steel-string acoustic guitar made by the Gibson Guitar Corporation
Gibson Guitar Corporation
since 1962.Contents1 History 2 Models 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The Dove was Gibson's second square-shouldered dreadnought, after the introduction of the Hummingbird in 1960. First made in 1962 in Kalamazoo, Michigan, it was based on the Martin D-style dreadnought.[1] Both Gibsons have solid spruce tops and engraved pickguards. The Dove has solid maple back and sides instead of the solid mahogany used for the Hummingbird, and a longer scale length (25.5" vs 24.75"). These make it a louder, brighter guitar than the Hummingbird.[citation needed] The double parallelogram fingerboard inlays, the two doves on the bridge, and the dove on the pickguard are mother-of-pearl
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