HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Gestetner
The Gestetner
Gestetner
is a type of duplicating machine named after its inventor, David Gestetner
David Gestetner
(1854 – 1939). Throughout the 20th century, the term became a verb (as in Gestetnering).Contents1 History 2 The Gestetner
Gestetner
Cyclograph 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] David Gestetner
David Gestetner
moved to London, England, and in 1879 filed his first copying patent there. A later patent in 1881 was for the Cyclostyle, a stylus that was part of the Cyclograph copying device. That same year, he also established the Gestetner
Gestetner
Cyclograph Company to produce duplicating machines, stencils, styli, ink rollers and related products
[...More...]

"Gestetner" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Offset Printing
Offset printing
Offset printing
is a commonly used printing technique in which the inked image is transferred (or "offset") from a plate to a rubber blanket, then to the printing surface. When used in combination with the lithographic process, which is based on the repulsion of oil and water, the offset technique employs a flat (planographic) image carrier on which the image to be printed obtains ink from ink rollers, while the non-printing area attracts a water-based film (called "fountain solution"), keeping the non-printing areas ink-free
[...More...]

"Offset Printing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Japan
Coordinates: 35°N 136°E / 35°N 136°E / 35; 136Japan 日本国 Nippon-koku or Nihon-kokuFlagImperial SealAnthem: "Kimigayo" 君が代"His Imperial Majesty's Reign"[2][3] Government
Government
Seal of JapanGo-Shichi no Kiri (五七桐)Area controlled by Japan
[...More...]

"Japan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

German National Library Of Economics
The German National Library of Economics
Economics
(ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics) is the world’s largest research infrastructure for economic literature, online as well as offline. The ZBW is a member of the Leibniz Association
Leibniz Association
and has been a foundation under public law since 2007. Several times the ZBW received the international LIBER award for its innovative work in librarianship.[3] The ZBW allows for access of millions of documents and research on economics, partnering with over 40 research institutions to create a connective Open Access portal and social web of research.[4] Through its EconStor and EconBiz, researchers and students have accessed millions of datasets and thousands of articles
[...More...]

"German National Library Of Economics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

20th Century Press Archives
The 20th Century Press Archives comprises more than 20 million of newspaper clippings, organized in folders about persons, companies, wares, events and topics. It originates from the Hamburg Kolonialinstitut
Kolonialinstitut
(colonial institute) founded in 1908. Within the Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA) it turned into a unique public press archives. In 2007 it was absorbed by the German National Library of Economics
German National Library of Economics
(ZBW) and merged with the Wirtschaftsarchiv (economics archive) of the Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), founded in 1914. Article collection was discontinued by end of 2005, but the archive is still open to the public.[1]Contents1 History 2 Areas of collection and extent 3 Partial digitization and the Pressemappe 20
[...More...]

"20th Century Press Archives" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Victoria County History
The Victoria History of the Counties of England, commonly known as the Victoria County History
Victoria County History
or the VCH, is an English history project which began in 1899 and was dedicated to Queen Victoria with the aim of creating an encyclopaedic history of each of the historic counties of England
[...More...]

"Victoria County History" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ralph Pugh
Ralph Bernard Pugh (1 August 1910 – 3 December 1982) was an historian and editor of the Victoria History of the Counties of England from 1949 to 1977. He was also a professor of English history at the University of London, a Fellow of St Edmund Hall, Oxford, a teacher of palaeography, and an expert on medieval penology.Contents1 Life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Selected publications 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Born at Sutton, Surrey, Pugh was the only child of Bernard Pugh (1859–1940), a journalist, by his marriage to Mabel Elizabeth (circa 1869–1943), and the grandson of Samuel Pugh, a Baptist minister in Devizes, Wiltshire, where until 1917 his uncles Clarence and Cyril Pugh were masters of the local grammar school. He was educated at Homefield, a preparatory school, then from 1924 to 1929 at St Paul's School, London, and finally at The Queen's College, Oxford, where he read modern history and graduated BA in 1932 with a First
[...More...]

"Ralph Pugh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Spirit Duplicator
A spirit duplicator (also referred to as a Ditto machine in North America, Banda machine in the UK or Roneo in Australia, France and South Africa) was a printing method invented in 1923 by Wilhelm Ritzerfeld and commonly used for much of the rest of the 20th century. The term "spirit duplicator" refers to the alcohols which were a major component of the solvents used as "inks" in these machines.[1][2][3] The device coexisted alongside the mimeograph. Spirit duplicators were used mainly by schools, churches, clubs, and other small organizations, such as in the production of fanzines, because of the limited number of copies one could make from an original, along with the low cost and correspondingly low quality of copying.Contents1 History 2 Design2.1 Colors3 Durability 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingHistory[edit] The spirit duplicator was invented in 1923 by Wilhelm Ritzerfeld
[...More...]

"Spirit Duplicator" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Thermofax
Thermo-Fax (very often Thermo fax[1]) is 3M's trademarked name for a photocopying technology which was introduced in 1950.[2][3] It was a form of thermographic printing and an example of a dry silver process.[4] It was a significant advance as no chemicals were required, other than those contained in the copy paper itself. A thin sheet of heat sensitive copy paper was placed on the original document to be copied, and exposed to infrared energy. Wherever the image on the original paper contained carbon, the image absorbed the infrared energy when heated
[...More...]

"Thermofax" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Typewriter
A typewriter is a mechanical or electromechanical machine for writing characters similar to those produced by printer's movable type. Typically, a typewriter has an array of keys, each of which causes a different single character to be produced on the paper by causing an inked ribbon to be struck against the paper by a type element similar to the sorts used in movable type letterpress printing. Commonly a separate type element (called a typebar) corresponds to each key, but the mechanism may also use a single type element (such as a typeball) with a different portion of it used for each possible character
[...More...]

"Typewriter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

British Museum
5,906,716 (2017)[2]Ranked 1st nationallyChairman Sir Richard LambertDirector Hartwig FischerPublic transit access Goodge Street; Holborn; Tottenham Court Road; Russell Square;Website britishmuseum.orgArea 807,000 sq ft (75,000 m2) in 94 GalleriesThe centre of the museum was redeveloped in 2001 to become the Great Court, surrounding the original Reading Room.The British Museum, located in the Bloomsbury
Bloomsbury
area of London, United Kingdom, is a public institution dedicated to human history, art and culture
[...More...]

"British Museum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kite Flying
A kite is a tethered heavier-than-air craft with wing surfaces that react against the air to create lift and drag. A kite consists of wings, tethers and anchors. Kites often have a bridle to guide the face of the kite at the correct angle so the wind can lift it.[2] Some kite designs don’t need a bridle; box kites can have a single attachment point. A kite may have fixed or moving anchors. One technical definition is that a kite is “a collection of tether-coupled wing sets“.[3] The lift that sustains the kite in flight is generated when air moves around the kite's surface, producing low pressure above and high pressure below the wings.[4] The interaction with the wind also generates horizontal drag along the direction of the wind
[...More...]

"Kite Flying" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Middle East
The Middle East[note 1] is a transcontinental region centered on Western Asia, Turkey
Turkey
(both Asian and European), and Egypt
Egypt
(which is mostly in North Africa). The corresponding adjective is Middle Eastern and the derived noun is Middle Easterner. The term has come into wider usage as a replacement of the term Near East
Near East
(as opposed to the Far East) beginning in the early 20th century. Arabs, Turks, Persians, Kurds, and Azeris (excluding Azerbaijan) constitute the largest ethnic groups in the region by population.[2] Minorities of the Middle East
Middle East
include Jews, Baloch, Greeks, Assyrians, and other Arameans, Berbers, Circassians
Circassians
(including Kabardians), Copts, Druze, Lurs, Mandaeans, Samaritans, Shabaks, Tats, and Zazas. In the Middle East, there is also a Romani community
[...More...]

"Middle East" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Europe
Europe
Europe
is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Since around 1850, Europe
Europe
is most commonly considered as separated from Asia
Asia
by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[5] Though the term "continent" implies physical geography, the land border is somewhat arbitrary and has moved since its first conception in classical antiquity
[...More...]

"Europe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

South Africa
[Note 1]11 languagesAfrikaans Northern Sotho English Southern Ndebele Southern Sotho Swazi Tsonga Tswana Venda Xhosa ZuluEthnic groups (2014[3])80.2% Black 8.8% Coloured 8.4% White 2.5% AsianReligion See Religion in South AfricaDemonym South AfricanGovernment Unitary dominant-party parliamentary constitutional republic• PresidentCyril Ramaphosa• Deputy PresidentDavid Mabuza• Chairperson of the National Council of ProvincesThandi Modise• Speaker of the National AssemblyBaleka Mbete• Chief JusticeMogoeng MogoengLegislature Parliament• Upper houseNational Council• Lower houseNational AssemblyIndependence from the United Kingdom• Union31 May 1910• Self-governance11 December 1931• Republic31 May 1961•
[...More...]

"South Africa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stylus
A stylus, plural styli or styluses,[1] is a writing utensil or a small tool for some other form of marking or shaping, for example, in pottery. It can also be a computer accessory that is used to assist in navigating or providing more precision when using touchscreens. It usually refers to a narrow elongated staff, similar to a modern ballpoint pen. Many styluses are heavily curved to be held more easily. Another widely used writing tool is the stylus used by blind users in conjunction with the slate for punching out the dots in Braille.[2]Reproduction of a Roman-style wax tablet with three stylusesStyluses were first used by the ancient Mesopotamians in order to write in cuneiform
[...More...]

"Stylus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.