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Geshe
Geshe
Geshe
(Tib. dge bshes, short for dge-ba'i bshes-gnyen, "virtuous friend"; translation of Skt. kalyāņamitra) or geshema is a Tibetan Buddhist academic degree for monks and nuns
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Dharma (Buddhism)
Dharma
Dharma
(/ˈdɑːrmə/;[8] Sanskrit: धर्म, translit. dharma, pronounced [dʱəɾmə] ( listen); Pali: धम्म, translit. dhamma, translit
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Svatantrika-Prasaṅgika Distinction
Distinction, distinct or distinctive may refer to: Distinction (philosophy), the recognition of difference Distinction (law), a principle in international law governing the legal use of force in an armed conflict Distinction (sociology), a social force that places different values on different individuals Distinct (mathematics) Distinctive feature, a concept in linguistics Distinción, in Spanish, separating consonantal sounds, see Phonological history of Spanish coronal fricatives The Hua–Yi distinction, the difference between China (Hua) and barbarian outsiders (Yi),
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Gorampa
Gorampa
Gorampa
Sonam Senge (Wylie: go rams pa bsod nams seng ge, 1429-1489[1]) was an important philosopher in the Sakya
Sakya
school of Tibetan Buddhism. He was the author of a vast collection of commentaries on sutra and tantra whose work was influential throughout Tibetan Buddhism. He established one of the definitive Tibetan understandings of the Prasaṅgika
Prasaṅgika
model of the Madhyamaka
Madhyamaka
school of philosophy
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Tantra Techniques (Vajrayana)
New branches:Blue Lotus AssemblyGateway of the Hidden FlowerNew Kadampa BuddhismShambhala BuddhismTrue Awakening TraditionHistoryTantrismMahasiddhaSahajaPursuitBuddhahood BodhisattvaKalachakraPracticesGeneration stage Completion stagePhowaTantric techniques: Fourfold division:KriyayogaCharyayogaYogatantraAnuttarayogatantraTwofold division:Inner TantrasOuter TantrasThought forms and visualisation:MandalaMantraMudraThangkaYantraYoga:Deity yogaDream yoga Death
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Tilopa
Tilopa (Prakrit; Sanskrit: Talika or Tilopada) (988–1069) was born in either Chativavo (Chittagong), Bengal
Bengal
or Jagora, Bengal
Bengal
in India. He was a tantric practitioner and mahasiddha. He practiced Anuttarayoga Tantra, a set of spiritual practices intended to accelerate the process of attaining Buddhahood. Naropa
Naropa
is considered his main student
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Pāramitā
Pāramitā
Pāramitā
(Sanskrit, Pali) or pāramī (Pāli) is "perfection" or "completeness". While, technically, pāramī and pāramitā are both Pāli terms, Pali
Pali
literature makes far greater reference to pāramī.Contents1 Etymology 2 Theravāda Buddhism2.1 Canonical sources 2.2 Historicity 2.3 Traditional practice3 Mahāyāna Buddhism 4 Tibetan Buddhism 5 See also 6 References6.1 Citations 6.2 Works cited7 External linksEtymology[edit] Donald S. Lopez, Jr. describes the etymology of the term:The term pāramitā, commonly translated as "perfection," has two etymologies. The first derives it from the word parama, meaning "highest", "most distant", and hence "chief", "primary", "most excellent". Hence, the substantive can be rendered "excellence" or "perfection"
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Avalokiteśvara
Avalokiteśvara
Avalokiteśvara
(/ˌʌvloʊkɪˈteɪʃvərə, ˌʌvə-/ UV-loh-kih-TAY-shvər-ə, UV-ə-;[1] Sanskrit: अवलोकितेश्वर) is a bodhisattva who embodies the compassion of all Buddhas. This bodhisattva is variably depicted, described and is portrayed in different cultures as either female or male.[2] In Chinese Buddhism, Avalokiteśvara
Avalokiteśvara
has become the somewhat different female figure Guanyin
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Pointing-out Instruction
New branches:Blue Lotus AssemblyGateway of the Hidden FlowerNew Kadampa BuddhismShambhala BuddhismTrue Awakening TraditionHistoryTantrismMahasiddhaSahajaPursuitBuddhahood BodhisattvaKalachakraPracticesGeneration stage Completion stagePhowaTantric techniques: Fourfold division:KriyayogaCharyayogaYogatantraAnuttarayogatantraTwofold division:Inner TantrasOuter TantrasThought forms and visualisation:MandalaMantraMudraThangkaYantraYoga:Deity yogaDream yogaDeath yogaNgöndro Guru
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Buddhist Meditation
Buddhist meditation
Buddhist meditation
is the practice of meditation in Buddhism
Buddhism
and Buddhist philosophy. It includes a variety of types of meditation. Core meditation techniques have been preserved in ancient Buddhist texts and have proliferated and diversified through teacher-student transmissions
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Householder (Buddhism)
In English translations of Buddhist texts, householder denotes a variety of terms. Most broadly, it refers to any layperson, and most narrowly, to a wealthy and prestigious familial patriarch.[1] In contemporary Buddhist communities, householder is often used synonymously with laity, or non-monastics. The Buddhist notion of householder is often contrasted with that of wandering ascetics (Pali: Pāḷi: samaṇa; Sanskrit: śramaṇa) and monastics (bhikkhu and bhikkhuni), who would not live (for extended periods) in a normal house and who would pursue freedom from attachments to houses and families. Upāsakas and upāsikās, also called śrāvakas and śrāvikās - are householders and other laypersons who take refuge in the Three Jewels (the Buddha, the teachings and the community) and practice the Five Precepts. In southeast Asian communities, lay disciples also give alms to monks on their daily rounds and observe weekly uposatha days
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Schools Of Buddhism
Schools of Buddhism
Buddhism
are the various institutional and doctrinal divisions of Buddhism
Buddhism
that have existed from ancient times up to the present. The classification and nature of various doctrinal, philosophical or cultural facets or schools of Buddhism
Buddhism
is vague and has been interpreted in many different ways, often due to the sheer number (perhaps thousands) of different sects, subsects, movements, etc. that have made up or currently make up the whole of Buddhist traditions
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Three Marks Of Existence
In Buddhism, the three marks of existence are three characteristics (Pali: tilakkhaṇa; Sanskrit: trilakṣaṇa) of all existence and beings, namely impermanence (anicca), unsatisfactoriness or suffering (dukkha),[1] and non-self (anattā).[2][3][4] These three characteristics are mentioned in verses 277, 278 and 279 of the Dhammapada.[5] That humans are subject to delusion about the three marks, that this delusion results in suffering, and that removal of that delusion results in the end of suffering, is a central theme in the Buddhist Four Noble Truths
Four Noble Truths
and Noble Eightfold Path.Contents1 Descri
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Skandha
Skandhas (Sanskrit) or khandhas (Pāḷi) means "heaps, aggregates, collections, groupings".[1] In Buddhism, it refers to the five aggregates concept that asserts five factors constitute and completely explain a sentient being’s mental and physical existence[2][3][4]. The five aggregates or heaps are: form (or matter or body) (rupa), sensations (or feelings, received from form) (vedana), perceptions (samjna), mental activity or formations (sankhara), and consciousness (vijnana).[5][6][7] The skandhas refute the idea of a "being or individual", and complements the anatta doctrine of Buddhism
Buddhism
which asserts that all thi
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Buddhist Cosmology
Buddhist
Buddhist
cosmology is the description of the shape and evolution of the Universe
Universe
according to the Buddhist
Buddhist
scriptures and commentaries. It consists of temporal and spatial cosmology, the temporal cosmology being the division of the existence of a 'world' into four discrete moments (the creation, duration, dissolution, and state of being dissolved, this does not seem to be a canonical division however). The spatial cosmology consists of a vertical cosmology, the various planes of beings, their bodies, characteristics, food, lifespan, beauty and a horizontal cosmology, the distribution of these world-systems into an "apparently" infinite sheet of universes
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Saṃsāra (Buddhism)
ᠣᠷᠴᠢᠯᠠᠩ, орчлон (orchilang, orchlon)Sinhalese සංසාරය (sansāra)Tibetan འཁོར་བ་ (khor ba)Thai วัฏสงสารVietnamese Luân hồiGlossary of BuddhismPart of a series onBuddhismHistoryTimeline Gautama BuddhaCouncils Later BuddhistsDharma ConceptsFour Noble TruthsFive Aggregates ImpermanenceSuffering Non-selfDependent OriginationMiddle Way Emptiness KarmaRebirth Saṃsāra CosmologyBuddhist textsBuddhavacana Tripiṭaka Mahayana
Mahayana
Sutras Pāli Canon T
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