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Gerold Späth
Gerold Späth
Gerold Späth
(* 16 October 1939 in Rapperswil) is a Swiss author, poet and writer.Contents1 Life and career 2 Work2.1 Books (excerpt)3 Poems (excerpt) 4 Filmographie 5 Awards 6 Literature 7 References 8 External linksLife and career[edit] Born 1939 in Rapperswil
Rapperswil
on the Obersee lakeshore in the canton of St. Gallen in Switzerland, the son of an organ builder made his studies in London and Fribourg, after a training as an export clerk. Later, he worked in his father's company Späth Orgelbau in Rapperswil. Thereafter, Gerold Späth
Gerold Späth
undertook several trips and a longer stay in Ireland
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Angelus Silesius
Angelus Silesius
Angelus Silesius
(c. 1624 – 9 July 1677), born Johann Scheffler and also known as Johann Angelus Silesius, was a German Catholic priest and physician, known as a mystic and religious poet. Born and raised a Lutheran, he adopted the name Angelus ( Latin
Latin
for "angel" or "heavenly messenger") and the epithet Silesius ("Silesian") on converting to Catholicism in 1653.[1] While studying in the Netherlands, he began to read the works of medieval mystics and became acquainted with the works of the German mystic
German mystic
Jacob Böhme
Jacob Böhme
through Böhme's friend, Abraham von Franckenberg.[2] Silesius's mystical beliefs caused tension between him and Lutheran
Lutheran
authorities and led to his eventual conversion to Catholicism. He took holy orders under the Franciscans and was ordained a priest in 1661
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Heinrich Von Morungen
Heinrich von Morungen
Heinrich von Morungen
or Henry of Morungen (died c. 1220 or 1222) was a German Minnesinger.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Editions 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Almost nothing about his life can be deduced from Heinrich's songs. Possibly he is identical with the Hendricus de Morungen who is documented in Thuringia. This Hendricus belonged to the class of minor knights and presumably originated from the castle of Morungen near Sangerhausen. As a "retired knight" (miles emeritus) he received from his patron, Dietrich IV, Margrave of Meissen, a pension for his "high personal merits" (alta suae vitae merita). He transferred this in 1213 to the monastery of St Thomas in Leipzig, which he entered himself in 1217. According to 16th century sources, he died there in 1222 after a journey to India
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Exilliteratur
German Exilliteratur (German pronunciation: [ɛˈksiːl.lɪtəʁaˌtuːɐ̯], exile literature) is the name for a category of books in the German language
German language
written by writers of anti-Nazi attitude who fled from Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
and its occupied territories between 1933 and 1945
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Austrian Literature
Austrian literature
Austrian literature
is the literature written in Austria, which is mostly, but not exclusively, written in the German language. Some scholars speak about Austrian literature
Austrian literature
in a strict sense from the year 1806 on when Francis II disbanded the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
and established the Austrian Empire. A more liberal definition incorporates all the literary works written on the territory of today's and historical Austria, especially when it comes to authors who wrote in German. Thus, the seven volume history of Austrian literature by the editors Herbert Zeman and Fritz Peter Knapp is titled History of the Literature
Literature
in Austria
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Swiss Literature
As there is no dominant national language, the four main languages of French, Italian, German and Romansch form the four branches which make up a literature of Switzerland. The original Swiss Confederation, from its foundation in 1291 up to 1798, gained only a few French-speaking districts in what is now the Canton of Fribourg, and so the German language dominated. During that period the Swiss vernacular literature was in German, although in the 18th century, French became fashionable in Bern and elsewhere. At that time, Geneva and Lausanne were not yet Swiss: Geneva was an ally and Vaud a subject land. The French branch does not really begin to qualify as Swiss writing until after 1815, when the French-speaking regions gained full status as Swiss cantons. The Italian and Romansch-Ladin branches are less prominent. Like the earlier charters of liberties, the original League of 1291 was drawn up in Latin
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German Studies
German studies is the field of humanities that researches, documents, and disseminates German language
German language
and literature in both its historic and present forms. Academic departments of German studies often include classes on German culture, German history, and German politics in addition to the language and literature component. Common German names for the field are Germanistik, Deutsche Philologie, and Deutsche Sprachwissenschaft und Literaturwissenschaft
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Dietmar Von Aist
Dietmar von Aist
Dietmar von Aist
(c. 1115 – c. 1171) was a Minnesinger
Minnesinger
from a baronial family in the Duchy of Austria, whose work is representative of the lyric poetry in the Danube
Danube
region.Dietmar von Aste: Alternative names used in the early literature for Dietmar von Aist
Dietmar von Aist
are Dietmar von Aste or von Ast, as depicted above in the "Konstanz-Weingartner Liederhandschrift" (written around 1310-1320 in the monastery St. Martin at Weingarten near Ravensburg). The unicorn served as heraldic animal for Dietmar.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Texts 4 Secondary literature 5 External linksLife[edit] One Dietmar von Aist
Dietmar von Aist
is mentioned by name from about 1139 onwards in contemporary records from Salzburg, Regensburg
Regensburg
and Vienna
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Reinmar Von Hagenau
Reinmar von Hagenau
Reinmar von Hagenau
(died before 1210) was a German minnesinger of the twelfth century, surnamed in the MSS. der Alte (the old) to distinguish him from later poets of that name. Reinmar is undoubtedly identical with the Reinmar referred to by Gottfried von Strassburg
Gottfried von Strassburg
in his Tristan
Tristan
as the nightingale of Hagenau, the leader of the choir of nightingales, whose voice had just been hushed by death and who was to be succeeded by Walther von der Vogelweide. From this it may be inferred that the poet or his family came from Hagenau (Haguenau) in Alsace
Alsace
(though there is also a place of that name in Austria), and that he died shortly before 1210, when Gottfried's "Tristan" was written. Otherwise nothing is known of Reinmar's life except what may be gathered from his verses
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Hartmann Von Aue
Hartmann von Aue, also known as Hartmann von Ouwe, (born c. 1160-70, died c. 1210-20) was a Middle High German
Middle High German
knight and poet. He introduced the courtly romance into German literature
German literature
and, with Wolfram von Eschenbach
Wolfram von Eschenbach
(c. 1170–c. 1220) and Gottfried von Strassburg (died c. 1210), was one of the three great epic poets of Middle High German
Middle High German
literature. He was also a Minnesänger, and 18 of his songs survive.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Editions and translations 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] He belonged to the lower nobility of Swabia, where he was born. After receiving a monastic education, he became retainer (Dienstmann) of a nobleman whose domain, Aue, has been identified with Obernau on the River Neckar. He also took part in the Crusade
Crusade
of 1196-97
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Walther Von Der Vogelweide
Walther von der Vogelweide
Walther von der Vogelweide
(c. 1170 – c. 1230) was a Minnesänger, who composed and performed love-songs and political songs ("Sprüche") in Middle High German. Walther has been described as greatest German lyrical poet before Goethe;[1] his hundred or so love-songs are widely regarded as the pinnacle of Minnesang, the medieval German love lyric, and his innovations breathed new life into the tradition of courtly love. He is also the first political poet writing in German, with a considerable body of encomium, satire, invective, and moralising. Little is known about his life, but he was a travelling singer who performed for patrons at various princely courts in Germany. He is particularly associated with the Babenberg
Babenberg
court in Vienna
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Wolfram Von Eschenbach
Wolfram von Eschenbach
Wolfram von Eschenbach
(c. 1160/80 – c. 1220) was a German knight and poet, regarded as one of the greatest epic poets of medieval German literature. As a Minnesinger, he also wrote lyric poetry.Contents1 Life 2 Works2.1 Parzival 2.2 Titurel and Willehalm 2.3 Lyric poetry3 Reception 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Little is known of Wolfram's life. There are no historical documents which mention him, and his works are the sole source of evidence. In Parzival
Parzival
he talks of wir Beier ("we Bavarians"); the dialect of his works is East Franconian. This and a number of geographical references have resulted in the present-day Wolframs-Eschenbach, until 1917 Obereschenbach, near Ansbach
Ansbach
in present-day Bavaria, being officially designated as his birthplace
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Albrecht Von Johansdorf
Albrecht von Johansdorf (c. 1180 – c. 1209) was a Minnesänger and a minor noble in the service of Wolfger of Erla. Documents indicate that his life included the years 1185 to 1209. He may have known Walther von der Vogelweide and is believed to have participated in a crusade. He is known to have written at least five "recruitment" songs in Middle High German, most likely for the Third Crusade. His "Song 2" owes a debt to the structure and melody from a song in Old French by trouvère poet Conon de Béthune. His "Song 5", which mentions the capture of Jerusalem, may suggest that he wrote around 1190.[1] Von Johansdorf's Minnelieder conform outwardly to the standard pattern of man subordinating himself to the woman above him and is responsible for the classical formulation of "the educative value of Minnedienst" (daz ir deste werde sit und da bi hochgemuot)
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Nibelungenlied
The Nibelungenlied, translated as The Song of the Nibelungs, is an epic poem in Middle High German. The story tells of dragon-slayer Siegfried at the court of the Burgundians, how he was murdered, and of his wife Kriemhild's revenge. The Nibelungenlied
Nibelungenlied
is based on pre-Christian Germanic heroic motifs (the "Nibelungensaga"), which include oral traditions and reports based on historic events and individuals of the 5th and 6th centuries. Old Norse
Old Norse
parallels of the legend survive in the Völsunga saga, the Prose Edda, the Poetic Edda, the Legend of Norna-Gest, and the Þiðrekssaga. In 2009, the three main manuscripts of the Nibelungenlied
Nibelungenlied
were inscribed in UNESCO's Memory of the World Register
Memory of the World Register
in recognition of their historical significance.[1]First page from Manuscript
Manuscript
C (ca
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Literary Realism
Literary realism
Literary realism
is part of the realist art movement beginning with mid nineteenth-century French literature (Stendhal), and Russian literature (Alexander Pushkin) and extending to the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.[1] Literary realism
Literary realism
attempts to represent familiar things as they are
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Gottfried Von Strassburg
Gottfried von Strassburg
Gottfried von Strassburg
(died c. 1210) is the author of the Middle High German courtly romance Tristan, an adaptation of the 12th-century Tristan and Iseult
Tristan and Iseult
legend. Gottfried's work is regarded, alongside Wolfram von Eschenbach's Parzival
Parzival
and the Nibelungenlied, as one of the great narrative masterpieces of the German Middle Ages. He is probably also the composer of a small number of surviving lyrics. His work became a source of inspiration for Richard Wagner's opera Tristan und Isolde (1865).Contents1 Life 2 Style 3 Sources 4 Text 5 Story 6 Interpretation 7 Gottfried and his contemporaries 8 Reception 9 Editions 10 Translations 11 Notes 12 References 13 External linksLife[edit] Other than an origin in or close association with Strasbourg, nothing is known of his life
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