HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Germanic Mythology
Germanic mythology
Germanic mythology
consists of the body of myths native to the Germanic peoples. Commonly featuring narratives focused on Germanic deities and a large variety of other entities, Germanic mythology dates from the Proto-Germanic
Proto-Germanic
period and reaches beyond the Christianization of the Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
and into modern Germanic folklore. Germanic mythology
Germanic mythology
includes Norse mythology, Anglo-Saxon mythology, and Continental Germanic mythology. As the Germanic languages
Germanic languages
developed from Proto-Indo-European language, Germanic mythology
Germanic mythology
is ultimately a development of Proto-Indo-European religion
[...More...]

"Germanic Mythology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

East Germanic Languages
Germanic peoplesEast Germanic peoplesGeographic distribution Varying depending on time (4th-18th centuries), currently none (all languages are extinct)Until late 4th century:[1] Central and eastern Europe (as far as Crimea) late 4th—early 10th centuries:[2] Much of southern, western, southeastern, and eastern Europe (as far as Crimea) and North Africa early 10th-late 18th centuries:[3] Isolated areas in eastern Europe (as far as Crimea)Linguistic classification Indo-EuropeanGermanicEast GermanicSubdivisionsBurgundian dialects Gothic dialects Vandalic
Vandalic
dialectsI
[...More...]

"East Germanic Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Przeworsk Culture
The Przeworsk[1] culture is part of an Iron Age
Iron Age
archaeological complex that dates from the 3rd century BC to the 5th century AD.[2] It was located in what is now central and southern Poland - the upper Oder
Oder
to the Vistula
Vistula
basin, later spreading to parts of eastern Slovakia and Subcarpathia
Subcarpathia
ranging between the Oder
Oder
and the middle and upper Vistula
Vistula
Rivers and extending south towards the middle Danube into the headwaters of the Dniester
Dniester
and Tisza
Tisza
Rivers
[...More...]

"Przeworsk Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pre-Roman Iron Age In Northern Europe
The archaeology of Northern Europe
Northern Europe
studies the prehistory of Scandinavia
Scandinavia
and the adjacent North European Plain, roughly corresponding to the territories of modern Sweden, Norway, Denmark, northern Germany, Poland
Poland
and the Netherlands. The region entered the Mesolithic
Mesolithic
around the 7th millennium BCE. The transition to the Neolithic
Neolithic
is characterized by the Funnelbeaker culture in the 4th millennium BCE. The Chalcolithic
Chalcolithic
is marked by the arrival of the Corded Ware culture, possibly the first influence in the region of Indo-European expansion. The Nordic Bronze Age
Nordic Bronze Age
proper begins roughly one millennium later, around 1500 BCE
[...More...]

"Pre-Roman Iron Age In Northern Europe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oksywie Culture
The Oksywie
Oksywie
culture (ger. Oxhöft-Kultur) was an archaeological culture that existed in the area of modern-day Eastern Pomerania around the lower Vistula
Vistula
river from the 2nd century BC to the early 1st century AD. It is named after the village of Oksywie, now part of the city of Gdynia
Gdynia
in northern Poland, where the first archaeological finds typical of this culture were discovered. Archaeological research during the past recent decades near Pomerania in Poland
Poland
suggests that the transition of the local component of the Pomeranian culture
Pomeranian culture
into the Oksywie
Oksywie
culture occurred in the 2nd century BC
[...More...]

"Oksywie Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Njörðr
In Norse mythology, Njörðr is a god among the Vanir. Njörðr, father of the deities Freyr and Freyja by his unnamed sister, was in an ill-fated marriage with the goddess Skaði, lives in Nóatún and is associated with the sea, seafaring, wind, fishing, wealth, and crop fertility. Njörðr is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson, in euhemerized form as a beloved mythological early king of Sweden in Heimskringla, also written by Snorri Sturluson in the 13th century, as one of three gods invoked in the 14th century Hauksbók ring oath, and in numerous Scandinavian place names
[...More...]

"Njörðr" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Northwest Germanic
Northwest Germanic is a proposed grouping of the Germanic languages, representing the current consensus among Germanic historical linguists. It does not challenge the late 19th-century tri-partite division of the Germanic dialects into North Germanic, West Germanic and East Germanic, but proposes additionally that North and West Germanic (i.e. all surviving Germanic languages
Germanic languages
today) remained as a subgroup after the southward migration of the East Germanic tribes, only splitting into North and West Germanic later. Whether this subgroup constituted a unified proto-language, or simply represents a group of dialects that remained in contact and close geographical proximity, is a matter of debate, but the formulation of Ringe and Taylor probably enjoys widespread support:There is some evidence that North and West Germanic developed as a single language, Proto-Northwest Germanic, after East Germanic had begun to diverge
[...More...]

"Northwest Germanic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ingvaeonic Languages
North Sea
North Sea
Germanic, also known as Ingvaeonic /ˌɪŋviːˈɒnɪk/, is a postulated grouping of the northern West Germanic languages, consisting of Old Frisian, Old English
Old English
and Old Saxon
Old Saxon
and their descendants. Ingvaeonic is named after the Ingaevones, a West Germanic cultural group or proto-tribe along the North Sea
North Sea
coast, mentioned by both Tacitus
Tacitus
and Pliny the Elder
Pliny the Elder
(the latter mentioning that tribes in the group included the Cimbri, the Teutoni, and the Chauci)
[...More...]

"Ingvaeonic Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

West Germanic Languages
The West Germanic languages
Germanic languages
constitute the largest of the three branches of the Germanic family of languages (the others being the North Germanic and the extinct East Germanic languages). The four most prevalent West Germanic languages
Germanic languages
are Afrikaans, English, German, and Dutch. The family also includes other High and Low German
Low German
languages including Yiddish, in addition to other Franconian languages, like Luxembourgish
Luxembourgish
and Ingvaeonic languages
Ingvaeonic languages
next to English, such as the Frisian languages
Frisian languages
and Scots
[...More...]

"West Germanic Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Old Norse
Old Norse
Old Norse
was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia
Scandinavia
and inhabitants of their overseas settlements during about the 9th to 13th centuries. The Proto-Norse language
Proto-Norse language
developed into Old Norse
Old Norse
by the 8th century, and Old Norse
Old Norse
began to develop into the modern North Germanic languages in the mid- to late 14th century, ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute, since written Old Norse
Old Norse
is found well into the 15th century.[2] Old Norse
Old Norse
was divided into three dialects: Old West Norse, Old East Norse, and Old Gutnish. Old West and East Norse formed a dialect continuum, with no clear geographical boundary between them
[...More...]

"Old Norse" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

North Germanic Languages
Insular Scandinavian languages:   Faroese   Icelandic   Norn (†)    Greenlandic Norse
Greenlandic Norse
(†)Extinct Norn was spoken in Orkney, Shetland
Shetland
and Caithness
Caithness
in what is now Scotland
Scotland
until the 19th century. Extinct Greenlandic Norse
Greenlandic Norse
was spoken in the Norse settlements of Greenland
Greenland
until their demise in the late 15th century.The North Germanic languages
Germanic languages
make up one of the three branches of the Germanic languages, a sub-family of the Indo-European languages, along with the West Germanic languages
Germanic languages
and the extinct East Germanic languages
[...More...]

"North Germanic Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Proto-Germanic Language
Proto-Germanic (abbreviated PGmc; German Urgermanisch; also called Common Germanic, German Gemeingermanisch) is the reconstructed proto-language of the Germanic branch of the Indo-European languages. Proto-Germanic developed from pre-Proto-Germanic into three branches during the first half of the first millennium of the Common Era: West Germanic, East Germanic
East Germanic
and North Germanic, which however remained in contact over a considerable time, especially the Ingvaeonic languages (including English), which arose from West Germanic dialects and remained in continued contact with North Germanic. A defining feature of Proto-Germanic is the completion of Grimm's law, a set of sound changes that occurred between its status as a dialect of Proto-Indo-European
Proto-Indo-European
and its gradual divergence into a separate language
[...More...]

"Proto-Germanic Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Germanic Parent Language
In historical linguistics, the Germanic parent language (GPL) includes the reconstructed languages in the Germanic group referred to as Pre-Germanic Indo-European (PreGmc), Early Proto-Germanic (EPGmc), and Late Proto-Germanic (LPGmc), spoken in the 2nd and 1st millennia BC. The less precise term Germanic, that appears in etymologies, dictionaries etcetera, loosely refers to a language spoken in the 1st millennium AD,[citation needed] proposedly at that time developing into the group of Germanic languages—a stricter term for that same proposition, but with an alternative chronography, is Proto-Germanic language. As an identifiable neologism, Germanic parent language appears to have been first used by Frans Van Coetsem
Frans Van Coetsem
in 1994. It also makes appearances in the works of Elzbieta Adamczyk, Jonathan Slocum, and Winfred P
[...More...]

"Germanic Parent Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Iron Age In Northern Europe
The archaeology of Northern Europe
Northern Europe
studies the prehistory of Scandinavia
Scandinavia
and the adjacent North European Plain, roughly corresponding to the territories of modern Sweden, Norway, Denmark, northern Germany, Poland
Poland
and the Netherlands. The region entered the Mesolithic
Mesolithic
around the 7th millennium BCE. The transition to the Neolithic
Neolithic
is characterized by the Funnelbeaker culture in the 4th millennium BCE. The Chalcolithic
Chalcolithic
is marked by the arrival of the Corded Ware culture, possibly the first influence in the region of Indo-European expansion. The Nordic Bronze Age
Nordic Bronze Age
proper begins roughly one millennium later, around 1500 BCE
[...More...]

"Roman Iron Age In Northern Europe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Germanic Wars
Gallic WarsVosges SabisEarly Imperial campaigns in GermaniaClades Lolliana Arbalo Lupia River Teutoburg Forest Idistaviso Marcomannic Wars
Marcomannic Wars
(participating Roman units) Roman–Alemannic WarsMediolanum Lake Benacus Placentia Fano Pavia Lingones Vindonissa Durocortorum Argentoratum SoliciniumGothic WarAd Salices Adrianople ThessalonicaVisigothic WarsPollentia Verona Faesulae Rome Narbonne Châlons Arelate VouilléVandalic WarsRome Cartagena Ad Decimum TricamarumAnglo-Saxon WarsGroans of the Britons Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain Treachery of the Long Knives Wippedesfleot Mercredesburne Mons Badonicus Dyrham Woden's Burg RaithOstrogothic WarsRome Faventia Rome Rome Sena Gallica Taginae Mons Lactarius"Germanic Wars" is a name given to a series of wars between the Romans and various Germanic tribes between 113 BC and 596 AD
[...More...]

"Germanic Wars" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Germanic Iron Age
The archaeology of Northern Europe
Northern Europe
studies the prehistory of Scandinavia
Scandinavia
and the adjacent North European Plain, roughly corresponding to the territories of modern Sweden, Norway, Denmark, northern Germany, Poland
Poland
and the Netherlands. The region entered the Mesolithic
Mesolithic
around the 7th millennium BCE. The transition to the Neolithic
Neolithic
is characterized by the Funnelbeaker culture in the 4th millennium BCE. The Chalcolithic
Chalcolithic
is marked by the arrival of the Corded Ware culture, possibly the first influence in the region of Indo-European expansion. The Nordic Bronze Age
Nordic Bronze Age
proper begins roughly one millennium later, around 1500 BCE
[...More...]

"Germanic Iron Age" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.