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Germanic Given Name
Germanic given names are traditionally dithematic; that is, they are formed from two elements, by joining a prefix and a suffix. For example, King Æþelred's name was derived from æþele, for "noble", and ræd, for "counsel". However, there are also from an early time names which seem to be monothematic, consisting only of a single element
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Germanic Languages
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze Age Terramare Tumulus
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Elf
An elf (plural: elves) is a type of human-shaped supernatural being in Germanic mythology
Germanic mythology
and folklore. In medieval Germanic-speaking cultures, elves seem generally to have been thought of as beings with magical powers and supernatural beauty, ambivalent towards everyday people and capable of either helping or hindering them.[1] However, the details of these beliefs have varied considerably over time and space, and have flourished in both pre-Christian and Christian cultures. The word elf is found throughout the Germanic languages
Germanic languages
and seems originally to have meant 'white being'. Reconstructing the early concept of an elf depends largely on texts, written by Christians, in Old and Middle English, medieval German, and Old Norse
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Audrey
Audrey /ˈɔːdri/ is an English feminine given name. It is the Anglo-Norman form of the Anglo-Saxon name Æðelþryð, composed of the elements æðel "noble" and þryð "strength". The Anglo-Norman form of the name was applied to Saint Audrey (d. 679), also known by the historical form of her name as Saint Æthelthryth. The same name also survived into the modern period in its Anglo-Saxon form, as Etheldred,[1] e.g. Etheldred Benett (1776–1845). In the 17th century, the name of Saint Audrey gave rise to the adjective tawdry "cheap and pretentious; cheaply adorned" (after a fair of St. Audrey where cheap lace was sold).[citation needed] As a consequence, use of the name declined, but it was revived in the 19th century
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Æðelþryð
Æthelthryth
Æthelthryth
(or Æðelþryð or Æþelðryþe; c. 636 – 23 June 679 AD) is the name for the Anglo-Saxon saint known, particularly in a religious context, as Etheldreda or Audrey. She was an East Anglian princess, a Fenland and Northumbrian
Northumbrian
queen and Abbess
Abbess
of Ely.Contents1 Life 2 Legacy 3 Hagiography 4 See also 5 References 6 Footnotes 7 Further reading 8 External linksLife[edit] Æthelthryth
Æthelthryth
was probably born in Exning, near Newmarket in Suffolk. She was one of the four saintly daughters of Anna of East Anglia, all of whom eventually retired from secular life and founded abbeys. Æthelthryth
Æthelthryth
made an early first marriage in around 652 to Tondberct, chief or prince of the South Gyrwe. She managed to persuade her husband to respect her vow of perpetual virginity that she had made prior to their marriage
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Ohthere
Ohthere
Ohthere
(also Ohtere), Old Norse
Old Norse
Óttarr vendilkráka (Vendelcrow; in Modern Swedish Ottar Vendelkråka) is a semi-legendary king of Sweden of the house of Scylfings, who would have lived during the 6th century (fl. c. 515 – c. 530[1]). His name can be reconstructed as Proto-Norse
Proto-Norse
*Ōhta-harjaz or *Ōhtu-harjaz. The harjaz element is common in Germanic names and has a meaning of "warrior, army" (whence English harry); by contrast, the oht element is less frequent, and has been tentatively interpreted as "fearsome, feared".[2] A prince of the Swedes, Ohthere
Ohthere
and his brother Onela conducted successful raids against the Geats
Geats
after King Hrethel had died
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Ecgbald
Ecgbald was a medieval Bishop of Winchester. He was consecrated between 759 and 778. He died between 781 and 784.[1] Citations[edit]^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 223References[edit]Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-56350-X. External links[edit] Ecgbald 3 at Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon EnglandChristian titlesPreceded by Æthelheard Bishop of Winchester c. 768–c
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Ecgwine
Egwin of Evesham[a] (died 30 December 717) was a Benedictine monk and, later, the third Bishop of Worcester
Bishop of Worcester
in England.Contents1 Life 2 Notes 3 Citations 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife[edit] Egwin was born in Worcester
Worcester
of a noble family, and was a descendant of Mercian kings.[2] He may possibly have been a nephew of King Æthelred of Mercia. Having already become a monk, his biographers say that king, clergy, and commoners all united in demanding Egwin's elevation to bishop; but the popularity which led him to the episcopal office dissipated in response to his performance as bishop.[2] He was consecrated bishop after 693.[3] As a bishop he was known as a protector of orphans and the widowed and a fair judge. He struggled with the local population over the acceptance of Christian morality; especially Christian marriage and clerical celibacy
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Ekkehart
Ekkehard (and Eckardt, Eckard, Eckhardt, Ekkehart) is a German given name. It is composed of the elements ekke "edge, blade; sword" and hart "brave; hardy". Variant forms include Eckard, Eckhard, Eckhart, Eckart. The Anglo-Saxon form of the name was Ecgheard, possibly attested in the toponym Eggerton. Middle Ages[edit] It was the name of five monks of the Abbey of Saint Gall
Abbey of Saint Gall
from the tenth to the thirteenth century: Ekkehard I (died 973) Ekkehard II (died 990) Ekkehard III Ekkehard IV (died c. 1056) Ekkehard V (died c
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Ecgwynn
Ecgwynn or Ecgwynna (fl. 890s), was the first consort of Edward the Elder, later King of the English (r. 899–924), by whom she bore the future King Æthelstan (r. 924–939), and a daughter who married Sihtric Cáech, Norse king of Dublin, Ireland and Northumbria. Extremely little is known about her background and life. Not even her name is given in any sources until after the Norman Conquest
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Alruna
Alruna
Alruna
( Old Norse
Old Norse
Ölrún, Old High German
Old High German
Ailrun, Modern German Alruna, Alraune) is a Germanic female personal name, from Proto Germanic *aliruna (or possibly *agilruna), which is formed from runa "secret, rune" and a debated prefix that may be ali-, agil-, or alu-. In German, Alruna
Alruna
was also used as a short form of Adelruna, a different name with a first element *athal- "noble". In Germanic mythology, Ailrun is the wife of Agilaz, the legendary archer. In the poem Völundarkviða, Ölrun (possibly Old Norse
Old Norse
"ale rune"[1]) is identified as a valkyrie, and as a daughter of Kiár
Kiár
of Valland. Alruna
Alruna
of Cham was an 11th-century Bavarian recluse, the Roman Catholic patroness of pregnancy
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Agilaz
Egil is a legendary hero of the Völundarkviða
Völundarkviða
and the Thidreks saga. The name is from Proto-Germanic
Proto-Germanic
*Agilaz[1] and the same legend is reflected in Old English
Old English
Ægil [æɡiɫ] of the Franks Casket
Franks Casket
and Alamannic Aigil of the Pforzen buckle. The Proto-Germanic
Proto-Germanic
form of the legend may only be guessed at, but it appears likely that Egil was a renowned archer who defended a keep together with his wife Aliruna, against numerous attackers
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Alaric (name)
Alaric is a masculine Germanic given name that, broken into its parts means Ala "everyone's" and ric "ruler". This has various forms in the several Germanic languages, such as Alareiks in the original Gothic and Alrekr in Old Norse. Most modern Germanic languages render it as Alarich or Alarik but Alaric is the form used in modern English, an adaptation of the Latinization (Alaricus) of the Gothic one—there is also the alternative Latinization Alarichus from Greek Ἀλάριχος --
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Ælfwine
Ælfwine (also Aelfwine, Elfwine) is an Old English personal name. It is composed of the elements ælf "elf" and wine "friend", continuing a hypothetical Common Germanic given name *albi-winiz which is also continued in Old High German and Lombardic as Albewin, Alpwin, Albuin, Alboin. Old Norse forms of the name are Alfvin and Ǫlfun. The name is often interpreted as "elf-friend", a translation notably made use of by J.R.R. Tolkien in his legendarium, where an Ælfwine is a character who "befriended the elves", but both the ælf and the wine element are frequent elements in Germanic anthroponymy, and these elements have in historical practice been combined without a compound meaning. The modern names Alwin, Alvin may be a reduction of this name, or alternatively of Adalwin, the Old High German cognate of the Anglo-Saxon Æthelwine.Contents1 Middle Ages 2 Modern 3 J.R.R. Tolkien 4 See also 5 ReferencesMiddle Ages[edit] The name of the elves is clearly of Common Germanic age
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Alfred (name)
Alfred is an English given name, one of the few Anglo-Saxon names which saw continued use until modern times. Its Old English form is Ælfræd (Old English pronunciation: [ˈælfˌræːd]), composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". It is also related to the name Alf of Old Norse. Its most famous bearer was Alfred the Great, the 9th-century English king. Due to the lasting fame of King Alfred, the name remained in use throughout the medieval period
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Ælfric
Ælfric ( Old English
Old English
Ælfrīc, Aelfric; Middle English
Middle English
Elfric) is an Anglo-Saxon given name. Churchmen[edit] Ælfric of Eynsham
Ælfric of Eynsham
(c. 955–c. 1010), late 10th century Anglo-Saxon abbot and writer Ælfric of Abingdon (died 1005), late 10th century Anglo-Saxon Archbishop of Canterbury Ælfric Bata (or "the bat") (fl. 1005) Ælfric Puttoc (died 1051), 11th century Anglo-Saxon Archbishop of York Ælfric of Crediton, late 10th century Anglo-Saxon Bishop of Crediton Ælfric (Bishop of Hereford), mid 10th century Anglo-Saxon Bishop of Hereford Ælfric of Ramsbury (fl. 940s), Bishop of Ramsbury Ælfric (archbishop-elect of Canterbury) (fl. 1050), Benedictine monk elected to but denied the see of Canterbury Ælfric I (died c
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