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Georgian Revival Architecture
Georgian architecture
Georgian architecture
is the name given in most English-speaking countries to the set of architectural styles current between 1714 and 1830. It is eponymous for the first four British monarchs of the House of Hanover—George I, George II, George III, and George IV—who reigned in continuous succession from August 1714 to June 1830. The style was revived in the late 19th century in the United States as Colonial Revival architecture
Colonial Revival architecture
and in the early 20th century in Great Britain as Neo-Georgian architecture; in both it is also called Georgian Revival architecture
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Architecture Of Georgia (country)
The Architecture of Georgia refers to the styles of architecture found in Georgia. Georgian architecture is influenced by a number of architectural styles, including several each for castles, towers, fortifications and churches. The Upper Svaneti
Svaneti
fortifications and the castle town of Shatili
Shatili
in Khevsureti
Khevsureti
are among the finest examples of medieval Georgian castles. Georgian medieval churches have a distinct character, though related to Armenian and Byzantine architecture, typically combining a conical dome raised high on a drum over a rectangular or cross-shaped lower structure. Often known as the "Georgian cross-dome style," this style of architecture developed in Georgia during the 9th century. Before that, most Georgian churches were basilicas
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Designer
A designer is a person who designs. More formally, a designer is an agent that "specifies the structural properties of a design object".[1] In practice, anyone who creates tangible or intangible objects, products, processes, laws, games, graphics, services, and experiences is referred to as a designer.Contents1 Overview 2 Design
Design
professions 3 See also 4 FootnotesOverview[edit] Classically, the main area of design was only architecture, which were understood as the major arts
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Edinburgh
Edinburgh
Edinburgh
(/ˈɛdɪnb(ə)rə/ ( listen);[6][7][8] Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Èideann [ˈt̪uːn ˈeːtʲən̪ˠ]; Scots: Edinburgh) is the capital city of Scotland
Scotland
and one of its 32 council areas. It is located in Lothian
Lothian
on the Firth of Forth's southern shore. Recognised as the capital of Scotland
Scotland
since at least the 15th century, Edinburgh
Edinburgh
is the seat of the Scottish Government, the Scottish Parliament and the supreme courts of Scotland. The city's Palace of Holyroodhouse is the official residence of the Monarchy in Scotland. Historically part of the county of Midlothian, the city has long been a centre of education, particularly in the fields of medicine, Scots law, literature, the sciences and engineering
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Georgian Dublin
Georgian Dublin
Dublin
is a phrase used in terms of the history of Dublin that has two interwoven meanings:to describe a historic period in the development of the city of Dublin, Ireland, from 1714 (the beginning of the reign of King George I of Great Britain and of Ireland) to the death in 1830 of King George IV. During this period, the reign of the four Georges, hence the word Georgian, covers a particular and unified style, derived from Palladian Architecture, which was used in erecting public and private buildings to describe the modern day surviving buildings in Dublin
Dublin
erected in that period and which share that architectural styleThough, strictly speaking, Georgian architecture could only exist during the reigns of the four Georges, it had its antecedents prior to 1714 and its style of building continued to be erected after 1830, until replaced by later styles named after the then monarch, Queen Victoria, i.e
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Newcastle Upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne
(RP: /ˌnjuːkɑːsəl əpɒn ˈtaɪn/ ( listen);[4] locally: /njuːˌkæsəl əpən ˈtaɪn/ ( listen)),[4] commonly known as Newcastle, is a city in Tyne and Wear, North East England, 103 miles (166 km) south of Edinburgh
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Bristol
Urban Chris Skidmore
Chris Skidmore
(Con) Jack Lopresti
Jack Lopresti
(Con)Area •&#
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Design
Design
Design
is the creation of a plan or convention for the construction of an object, system or measurable human interaction (as in architectural blueprints, engineering drawings, business processes, circuit diagrams, and sewing patterns).[1] Design
Design
has different connotations in different fields (see design disciplines below). In some cases, the direct construction of an object (as in pottery, engineering, management, coding, and graphic design) is also considered to use design thinking. Designing often necessitates considering the aesthetic, functional, economic, and sociopolitical dimensions of both the design object and design process. It may involve considerable research, thought, modeling, interactive adjustment, and re-design
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Pattern Book
Pattern in architecture is the idea of capturing architectural design ideas as archetypal and reusable descriptions. The term "pattern" in this context is usually attributed to Christopher Alexander,[1] an Austrian born American architect. The patterns serve as an aid to design cities and buildings. The concept of having collections of "patterns", or typical samples as such, is much older. One can think of these collections as forming a pattern language, whereas the elements of this language may be combined, governed by certain rules.Contents1 Alexander's idea of patterns 2 Pattern language 3 See also3.1 Architecture 3.2 Computer science4 References 5 Further readingAlexander's idea of patterns[edit] Alexander's patterns seek to provide a source of proven ideas for individuals and communities to use in constructing their living and working environment
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Engraving
Engraving
Engraving
is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, usually flat surface by cutting grooves into it. The result may be a decorated object in itself, as when silver, gold, steel, or glass are engraved, or may provide an intaglio printing plate, of copper or another metal, for printing images on paper as prints or illustrations; these images are also called engravings. Wood engraving
Wood engraving
is a form of relief printing and is not covered in this article. Engraving
Engraving
was a historically important method of producing images on paper in artistic printmaking, in mapmaking, and also for commercial reproductions and illustrations for books and magazines
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William Halfpenny
William Halfpenny
William Halfpenny
(active 1723–1755) was an English architect and builder in the first half of the 18th century, and prolific author of builder's pattern books. In some of his publications he described himself as "architect and carpenter", and his books concentrate on the practical information a builder would need, as well as addressing "gentleman draughtsmen" designing their own houses
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Architect
An architect is a person who plans, designs, and reviews the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to provide services in connection with the design of buildings and the space within the site surrounding the buildings, that have as their principal purpose human occupancy or use.[1] Etymologically, architect derives from the Latin architectus, which derives from the Greek (arkhi-, chief + tekton, builder), i.e., chief builder.[2] Professionally, an architect's decisions affect public safety, and thus an architect must undergo specialized training consisting of advanced education and a practicum (or internship) for practical experience to earn a license to practice architecture
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Construction Worker
A construction worker is a tradesperson, laborer, or professional employed in the physical construction of the built environment and its infrastructure. Description[edit] The term construction worker is a generic term and most construction workers are primarily described by the type of work they perform (their trade)
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Terraced House
In architecture and city planning, a terraced or terrace house (UK) or townhouse (US)[1] exhibits a style of medium-density housing that originated in Europe in the 16th century, where a row of identical or mirror-image houses share side walls. They are also known in some areas as row houses (specifically Philadelphia, Washington and Baltimore) or linked houses. Terrace housing can be found throughout the world, though it is in abundance in Europe and Latin America, and extensive examples can be found in Northern America and Australia. The Place des Vosges
Place des Vosges
in Paris (1605–1612) is one of the early examples of the style
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Carpenter
Carpentry
Carpentry
is a skilled trade in which the primary work performed is the cutting, shaping and installation of building materials during the construction of buildings, ships, timber bridges, concrete formwork, etc. Carpenters traditionally worked with natural wood and did the rougher work such as framing, but today many other materials are also used[1] and sometimes the finer trades of cabinetmaking and furniture building are considered carpentry. Carpentry
Carpentry
in the United States
United States
is almost always done by men
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