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George W. Bush Presidential Campaign, 2000
The 2000 presidential campaign of George W. Bush, the 46th Governor of Texas, was formally launched on June 14, 1999 as Governor Bush, the eldest son of former President George H.W. Bush
George H.W. Bush
announced his intention to seek the Republican nomination for President of the United States. Platform[edit] Bush's original platform, before the September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attacks and the War on Terrorism:Compassionate Conservatism: The Bush campaign made extensive use of the "Compassionate conservatism" concept, based in large part on a book by Marvin Olasky of the same name, with a Foreword by then-governor Bush.Income Group (thousands of dollars) Average Savings (dollars)0-10 510-20 6320-30 20430-40 35140-50 50050-75 82075-100 1,776100-200 2,710200-500 5,527500-1,000 17,6051,000+ 88,873Foreign Affairs: Bush promised a humble foreign policy with no nation building
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Energy Policy Of The United States
The energy policy of the United States
United States
is determined by federal, state, and local entities in the United States, which address issues of energy production, distribution, and consumption, such as building codes and gas mileage standards
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Nation-building
Nation-building is constructing or structuring a national identity using the power of the state.[1] It is thus narrower than what Paul James calls "nation formation", the broad process through which nations come into being.[2] Nation-building aims at the unification of the people within the state so that it remains politically stable and viable in the long run. According to Harris Mylonas, "Legitimate authority in modern national states is connected to popular rule, to majorities
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United States Presidential Election, 1996
Bill Clinton DemocraticElected President Bill Clinton DemocraticThe United States
United States
presidential election of 1996 was the 53rd quadrennial presidential election. It was held on Tuesday, November 5, 1996.[2] Incumbent Democratic President Bill Clinton
Bill Clinton
defeated Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, the Republican nominee. Clinton and Vice President Al Gore
Al Gore
were re-nominated without incident by the Democratic Party. Numerous candidates entered the 1996 Republican primaries, with Dole considered the early front-runner. Dole clinched the nomination after defeating challenges by publisher Steve Forbes
Steve Forbes
and paleoconservative leader Pat Buchanan. Dole's running mate was Jack Kemp, a former Congressman and football player who had served as the Housing Secretary under President George H. W
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North Korea
Coordinates: 40°00′N 127°00′E / 40.000°N 127.000°E / 40.000; 127.000Democratic People's Republic of Korea 조선민주주의인민공화국 Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin KonghwagukFlagEmblemAnthem: "Aegukka" Korean: 애국가, The Patriotic SongArea controlled by the North Korean state are shown in dark green; North Korean-claimed but uncontrolled regions shown in light green.Status Sovereign stateCapital and largest city Pyongyang 39°2′N 125°45′E / 39.033°N 125.750°E / 39.033; 125.750Official languages Korean[1]Official script Chosŏn'gŭl[2]DemonymNorth Korean KoreanGovernment Unitary one-party Juche
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September 11, 2001, Terrorist Attacks
The September 11 attacks (also referred to as 9/11)[a] were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda on the United States
United States
on the morning of Tuesday, September 11, 2001. The attacks killed 2,996 people, injured over 6,000 others, and caused at least $10 billion in infrastructure and property damage.[2][3] Four passenger airliners operated by two major U.S. passenger air carriers ( United Airlines
United Airlines
and American Airlines) – all of which departed from airports in the northeastern United States
United States
bound for California – were hijacked by 19 al-Qaeda terrorists
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J. Steven Griles
James Steven "Steve" Griles (born December 13, 1947) was an American coal industry lobbyist and the United States Deputy Secretary of the Interior during the George W
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Petroleum
Petroleum
Petroleum
is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column. It consists of hydrocarbons of various molecular weights and other organic compounds.[1] The name petroleum covers both naturally occurring unprocessed crude oil and petroleum products that are made up of refined crude oil. A fossil fuel, petroleum is formed when large quantities of dead organisms, usually zooplankton and algae, are buried underneath sedimentary rock and subjected to both intense heat and pressure. Petroleum
Petroleum
has mostly been recovered by oil drilling (natural petroleum springs are rare)
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Oil Reserves
Oil reserves
Oil reserves
denote the amount of crude oil that can be technically recovered at a cost that is financially feasible at the present price of oil.[1] Hence reserves will change with the price, unlike oil resources, which include all oil that can be technically recovered at any price. Reserves may be for a well, for a reservoir, for a field, for a nation, or for the world. Different classifications of reserves are related to their degree of certainty. The total estimated amount of oil in an oil reservoir, including both producible and non-producible oil, is called oil in place. However, because of reservoir characteristics and limitations in petroleum extraction technologies, only a fraction of this oil can be brought to the surface, and it is only this producible fraction that is considered to be reserves
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Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
National Wildlife Refuge
(ANWR or Arctic Refuge) is a national wildlife refuge in northeastern Alaska, United States. It consists of 19,286,722 acres (78,050.59 km2) in the Alaska
Alaska
North Slope region.[1] It is the largest National Wildlife Refuge
National Wildlife Refuge
in the country, slightly larger than the Yukon
Yukon
Delta National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge is administered from offices in Fairbanks. Just across the border in Yukon, Canada, are two Canadian National Parks, Ivvavik and Vuntut.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Drilling3.1 Porcupine caribou
Porcupine caribou
herd4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The move to protect this corner of Alaska
Alaska
began in the middle of the twentieth century
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Energy
In physics, energy is the quantitative property that must be transferred to an object in order to perform work on, or to heat, the object.[note 1] Energy
Energy
is a conserved quantity; the law of conservation of energy states that energy can be converted in form, but not created or destroyed. The SI unit of energy is the joule, which is the energy transferred to an object by the work of moving it a distance of 1 metre against a force of 1 newton. Common forms of energy include the kinetic energy of a moving object, the potential energy stored by an object's position in a force field (gravitational, electric or magnetic), the elastic energy stored by stretching solid objects, the chemical energy released when a fuel burns, the radiant energy carried by light, and the thermal energy due to an object's temperature. Mass
Mass
and energy are closely related
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Education
Education
Education
is the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowledge, skills, values, beliefs, and habits. Educational methods include storytelling, discussion, teaching, training, and directed research. Education
Education
frequently takes place under the guidance of educators, but learners may also educate themselves.[1] Education
Education
can take place in formal or informal settings and any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts may be considered educational
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Public Broadcasting Service
The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) is an American public broadcaster and television program distributor.[2] It is a non-profit organization and is the most prominent provider of government-funded educational television programming to public television stations in the United States, distributing series such as Keeping Up Appearances, BBC World News
BBC World News
(as BBC World News
BBC World News
America since 2012), Nova ScienceNow, Nova, Arthur, Sesame Street, PBS
PBS
NewsHour, Walking with Dinosaurs, Masterpiece, Nature, Rick Steves' Europe, American Masters, Frontline, and Antiques Roadshow. PBS
PBS
is funded by member station dues, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, government agencies, corporations, foundations and individual citizens
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Small Business
Small businesses are privately owned corporations, partnerships, or sole proprietorships that have fewer employees and/or less annual revenue than a regular-sized business or corporation. Businesses are defined as "small" in terms of being able to apply for government support and qualify for preferential tax policy varies depending on the country and industry. Small businesses range from fifteen employees under the Australian Fair Work Act 2009, fifty employees according to the definition used by the European Union, and fewer than five thousand employees, to qualify for many U.S. Small Business Administration programs
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UBS
Union Bank of Switzerland
Union Bank of Switzerland
and Swiss Bank Corporation
Swiss Bank Corporation
merged in 1998; PaineWebber
PaineWebber
merged in 2000Founded April 1862; 156 years ago (1862-04) As Bank
Bank
in WinterthurHeadquarters Bahnhofstrasse
Bahnhofstrasse
45 Zürich[1]Area servedInternational serviceKey people Axel A. Weber
Axel A

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Economics
Economics
Economics
(/ɛkəˈnɒmɪks, iːkə-/)[1][2][3] is the social science that studies the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.[4] Economics
Economics
focuses on the behaviour and interactions of economic agents and how economies work. Microeconomics
Microeconomics
analyzes basic elements in the economy, including individual agents and markets, their interactions, and the outcomes of interactions. Individual agents may include, for example, households, firms, buyers, and sellers. Macroeconomics analyzes the entire economy (meaning aggregated production, consumption, savings, and investment) and issues affecting it, including unemployment of resources (labour, capital, and land), inflation, economic growth, and the public policies that address these issues (monetary, fiscal, and other policies)
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