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George Somes Layard
George Somes Layard (1857–1925) was an English barrister and man of letters.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Family 4 NotesLife[edit] He was the third son of Charles Clement Layard, rector of Combe Hay
Combe Hay
in Somerset, born at Clifton, Bristol; Nina Frances Layard was his sister. He was educated at Monkton Combe
Monkton Combe
school and Harrow School. Matriculating at Trinity College, Cambridge
Trinity College, Cambridge
in 1876, he graduated B.A. in 1881, and was called to the bar that year at the Inner Temple, which he had joined in 1877.[1][2] Layard became an author, journalist and bibliophile.[3] Works[edit]The Life and Letters of Charles Samuel Keene (1892) [1] Tennyson and his pre-Raphaelite illustrators. A book about a book (1894) [2] Portraits of Cruikshank by Himself (1897) Mrs
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Combe Hay
Combe Hay
Combe Hay
is a village and civil parish in the English county of Somerset. It falls within the Cotswolds
Cotswolds
Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The parish has a population of 147.[1]Contents1 History 2 Governance 3 Religious sites 4 See also 5 References 6 Gallery 7 External linksHistory[edit]The Fuller's Earth Works at Combe Hay
Combe Hay
in 2015 Combe Hay
Combe Hay
was known in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
as Cumb
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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National Library Of Australia
The National Library of Australia
Australia
is the largest reference library in Australia, responsible under the terms of the National Library Act for "maintaining and developing a national collection of library material, including a comprehensive collection of library material relating to Australia
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Union List Of Artist Names
The Union List of Artist Names (ULAN) is an online database using a controlled vocabulary currently containing around 293,000 names and other information about artists. Names in ULAN may include given names, pseudonyms, variant spellings, names in multiple languages, and names that have changed over time (e.g., married names). Among these names, one is flagged as the preferred name. Although it is displayed as a list, ULAN is structured as a thesaurus, compliant with ISO and NISO standards for thesaurus construction; it contains hierarchical, equivalence, and associative relationships. The focus of each ULAN record is an artist. Currently there are around 120,000 artists in the ULAN. In the database, each artist record (also called a subject in this manual) is identified by a unique numeric ID. Linked to each artist record are names, related artists, sources for the data, and notes
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Marion Harry Spielmann
Marion Harry Alexander Spielmann (London 22 May 1858 – 1948) was a prolific Victorian art critic and scholar who was the editor of The Connoisseur and Magazine of Art. Among his voluminous output, he wrote a history of Punch magazine, the first biography of John Everett Millais and a detailed investigation into the evidence for portraits of William Shakespeare. Biography[edit] Spielmann was born in London, the son of a Polish Jew who settled in England. He was educated at University College School and University College, London. He soon established himself as an art journalist, writing for the Pall Mall Gazette from 1883 to 1890, most notably discussing the work of G. F. Watts.[1] By the 1880s, Spielmann had become "one of the most powerful figures in the late Victorian art world".[2] From 1887 to 1904 Spielmann edited the Magazine of Art
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Somerset
Somerset
Somerset
(/ˈsʌmərsɛt/ ( listen)) (or archaically, Somersetshire) is a county in South West England
England
which borders Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
and Bristol
Bristol
to the north, Wiltshire
Wiltshire
to the east, Dorset
Dorset
to the south-east and Devon
Devon
to the south-west. It is bounded to the north and west by the Severn Estuary
Severn Estuary
and the Bristol
Bristol
Channel, its coastline facing southeastern Wales
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Inner Temple
The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, commonly known as Inner Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court
Inns of Court
(professional associations for barristers and judges) in London. To be called to the Bar and practise as a barrister in England and Wales, an individual must belong to one of these Inns. It is located in the wider Temple area of the capital, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London. The Inn is a professional body that provides legal training, selection, and regulation for members. It is ruled by a governing council called "Parliament", made up of the Masters of the Bench (or "Benchers"), and led by the Treasurer, who is elected to serve a one-year term. The Temple takes its name from the Knights Templar, who originally leased the land to the Temple's inhabitants (Templars) until their abolition in 1312
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Called To The Bar
The call to the bar is a legal term of art in most common law jurisdictions where persons must be qualified to be allowed to argue in court on behalf of another party and are then said to have been "called to the bar" or to have received a "call to the bar". "The bar" is now used as collective noun for barristers, but literally referred to the wooden barrier in old courtrooms, which separated the often crowded public area at the rear from the space near the judges reserved for those having business with the Court. Barristers
Barristers
would sit or stand immediately behind it, facing the judge, and could use it as a table for their briefs. Like many other common law terms, the term originated in England in the Middle Ages, and the call to the bar refers to the summons issued to one found fit to speak at the 'bar' of the royal courts
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Trinity College, Cambridge
Trinity
Trinity
College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge in England. With around 700 undergraduates, 350 graduates, and over 180 fellows, it is the largest college in either of the Oxbridge
Oxbridge
universities by number of undergraduates. By combined student numbers, it is second to Homerton College, Cambridge.[2] Members of Trinity
Trinity
have won 32 Nobel Prizes[3] out of the 98 won by members of Cambridge University, the highest number of any college at either Oxford
Oxford
or Cambridge
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Harrow School
Harrow
Harrow
School /ˈhæroʊ/[2] is an independent boarding school for boys in Harrow, London, England.[3] The School was founded in 1572 by John Lyon under a Royal Charter
Royal Charter
of Elizabeth I, and is one of the original seven public schools that were regulated by the Public Schools Act 1868. Harrow
Harrow
charges up to £12,850 per term, with three terms per academic year (2017/18).[4] Harrow
Harrow
is the fourth most expensive boarding school in the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference.[5] The school has an enrolment of 821 boys[6] all of whom board full-time, in twelve boarding houses.[7] It remains one of four all-boys, full-boarding schools in Britain, the others being Eton College, Radley College
Radley College
and Winchester College.[citation needed] Harrow's uniform includes straw hats, morning suits, top hats and canes
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Monkton Combe
Monkton Combe
Monkton Combe
is a village and civil parish in north Somerset, England, 3 miles (4.8 km) south of Bath. The parish, which includes the hamlet of Tucking Mill, has a population of 554.[1]Contents1 History 2 Governance 3 Religious sites 4 Landmarks 5 School 6 Gallery 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Monkton Combe
Monkton Combe
was part of the hundred of Bath Forum.[2][3] According to Rev. John Collinson in his History of Somerset
Somerset
(1791), the town's proper name is Combe Monkton, or really just Combe with the Monkton being attached as an adjective to differentiate it from neighbouring Combe Down
Combe Down
and Combe Grove
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