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George Mifflin Dallas
George Mifflin Dallas
Dallas
(July 10, 1792 – December 31, 1864) was an American politician and diplomat who served as Mayor of Philadelphia
Philadelphia
from 1828 to 1829 and as the 11th Vice President of the United States from 1845 to 1849. The son of Secretary of the Treasury Alexander J. Dallas, George Dallas
Dallas
attended elite preparatory schools before embarking on a legal career. He served as the private secretary to Albert Gallatin
Albert Gallatin
and worked for the Treasury Department and the Second Bank of the United States. He emerged as a leader of the "Family party" faction of the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Democratic Party, and Dallas
Dallas
developed a rivalry with James Buchanan, the leader of the "Amalgamator" faction
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Edinburgh
Edinburgh
Edinburgh
(/ˈɛdɪnb(ə)rə/ ( listen);[6][7][8] Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Èideann [ˈt̪uːn ˈeːtʲən̪ˠ]; Scots: Edinburgh) is the capital city of Scotland
Scotland
and one of its 32 council areas. It is located in Lothian
Lothian
on the Firth of Forth's southern shore. Recognised as the capital of Scotland
Scotland
since at least the 15th century, Edinburgh
Edinburgh
is the seat of the Scottish Government, the Scottish Parliament and the supreme courts of Scotland. The city's Palace of Holyroodhouse is the official residence of the Monarchy in Scotland. Historically part of the county of Midlothian, the city has long been a centre of education, particularly in the fields of medicine, Scots law, literature, the sciences and engineering
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Second Bank Of The United States
The Second Bank of the United States, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was the second federally authorized Hamiltonian national bank[3] in the United States during its 20-year charter from February 1816[4] to January 1836.[5] The bank's formal name, according to section 9 of its charter as passed by Congress, was "The President, Directors, and Company, of the Bank of the United States."[6] A private corporation with public duties, the bank handled all fiscal transactions for the U.S. Government, and was accountable to Congress and the U.S. Treasury. Twenty percent of its capital was owned by the federal government, the bank's single largest stockholder.[7][8] Four thousand private investors held 80% of the bank's capital, including one thousand Europeans
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Charles Jared Ingersoll
Charles Jared Ingersoll
Jared Ingersoll
(October 3, 1782 – May 14, 1862) was an American lawyer and Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Bibliography 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he was the son of Jared Ingersoll who served in the Continental Congress, and brother of Joseph Reed Ingersoll. Charles Ingersoll dropped out of the College of New Jersey, later Princeton University, in 1799.[1] He then studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1802 and commenced practice in Philadelphia. He traveled in Europe for a time, and was attached to the U. S. embassy in France. He was elected as a Democratic-Republican
Democratic-Republican
to the Thirteenth Congress, where he served as chairman of the United States
United States
House Committee on the Judiciary
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Henry D. Gilpin
Henry Dilworth Gilpin (April 14, 1801 – January 29, 1860) was an American lawyer and statesman of Quaker
Quaker
extraction who served as Attorney General of the United States
Attorney General of the United States
under President Martin Van Buren. He was the son of Joshua Gilpin and Mary Dilworth, and was born in Lancaster, England, just before his parents returned to America. His father had been on extended tour of Britain and Europe, lasting from 1795 to 1801, during which he obtained information about the new manufacturing methods used in paper-making for his family paper mills on Brandywine Creek in Delaware. His mother was from the Quaker Dilworths of Lancaster, England. The family returned to England for another tour in 1812, and returned to the United States in about 1816, during which time Henry attended school near London. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania, he studied law with Joseph R
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Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
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Democratic Party (United States)
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (GOP). Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest political party.[16] The Democrats' dominant worldview was once social conservatism and economic liberalism while populism was its leading characteristic in the rural South. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, leading to a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party and Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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Princeton University
Princeton University
Princeton University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Princeton, New Jersey
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Mayor Of Philadelphia
The Mayor
Mayor
of Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the chief executive of the government of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,[1] as stipulated by the Charter of the City of Philadelphia. The current Mayor
Mayor
of Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is Jim Kenney.Contents1 History 2 Mayors 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksHistory[edit] The first mayor of Philadelphia, Humphrey Morrey, was appointed by city founder William Penn. Edward Shippen was appointed by Penn as first mayor under the charter of 1701, then was elected to a second term by the City Council. Subsequent mayors, who held office for one year, were elected by the city council from among their number. No compensation was paid to the earliest office-holders, and candidates often objected strongly to their being selected, sometimes choosing even to pay a fine rather than serve
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Albert Gallatin
Abraham Alfonse Albert Gallatin
Albert Gallatin
(January 29, 1761 – August 12, 1849) was a Swiss-American politician, diplomat, ethnologist and linguist. He was an important leader of the Democratic-Republican Party, serving in various federal elective and appointed positions across four decades. He represented Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
in the Senate and the House of Representatives before becoming the longest-tenured United States Secretary of the Treasury and serving as a high-ranking diplomat. Born in Geneva
Geneva
in present-day Switzerland, Gallatin immigrated to the United States
United States
in the 1780s, settling in western Pennsylvania. He served as a delegate to the 1789 Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
constitutional convention and won election to the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
General Assembly
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United States Senate
Majority (50)     Republican (50)Minority (49)     Democratic (47)      Independents (2) caucusing with the DemocratsVacant (1)     Vacant (1)Length of term6 yearsElectionsVoting systemFirst-past-the-post; nonpartisan blanket primary with a majoritarian second round in 3 states.Last electionNovember 8, 2016 (34 seats)Next electionNovember 6, 2018 (33 seats)Meeting placeSenate chamber United States
Unite

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United States Attorney
United States Attorneys (also known as chief federal prosecutors and, historically, as United States District Attorneys)[1][2][3] represent the United States federal government in United States district courts and United States courts of appeals. The prosecution is the legal party responsible for presenting the case against an individual suspected of breaking the law, initiating and directing further criminal investigations, guiding and recommending the sentencing of offenders, and are the only attorneys allowed to participate in grand jury proceedings.[4][not in citation given] There are 93 U.S. Attorney offices located throughout the United States, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands. One U.S. Attorney is assigned to each of the judicial districts, with the exception of Guam
Guam
and the Northern Mariana Islands where a single U.S. Attorney serves both districts. Each U.S
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Russia
Coordinates: 60°N 90°E / 60°N 90°E / 60; 90Russian Federation Росси́йская Федерaция (Russian) Rossiyskaya FederatsiyaFlagCoat of armsAnthem:  "Gosudarstvenny gimn Rossiyskoy Federatsii"  (transliteration) "State Anthem of the Russian Federation"Location of Russia
Russia
(green) Russian-administered Crimea
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Whig Party (United States)
The Whig Party was a political party active in the middle of the 19th century in the United States. Four United States
United States
Presidents belonged to the party while in office.[5] It emerged in the 1830s as the leading opponent of Jacksonians, pulling together former members of the National Republican (one of the successors of the Democratic-Republican Party) and the Anti-Masonic Party. It had links to the upscale traditions of the Federalist Party. Along with the rival Democratic Party, it was central to the Second Party System
Second Party System
from the early 1840s to the mid-1860s.[6] It originally formed in opposition to the policies of President Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson
(in office 1829–1837) and his Democratic Party
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Popular Sovereignty
Popular sovereignty, or the sovereignty of the peoples' rule, is part of the seven principles, that the authority of a state and its government is created and sustained by the consent of its people, through their elected representatives (Rule by the People), who are the source of all political power. It is closely associated with social contract philosophers such as Thomas Hobbes, John Locke
John Locke
and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Popular sovereignty expresses a concept and does not necessarily reflect or describe a political reality.[a] The people have the final say in government decisions
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