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George Middleton (1735–1815)
George Middleton (1735 – April 6, 1815) was an African-American Revolutionary War veteran, a Prince Hall
Prince Hall
Freemason, and a community civil rights activist in Massachusetts.Contents1 War service 2 Post-war 3 References 4 External linksWar service[edit] Middleton was one of 5,000 African Americans to serve in the military on the Patriot side of the Revolutionary War, although scant evidence survives about his military service. Colonel Middleton served as commander of the Bucks of America, a Boston-based unit of the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
militia. Few details have survived about the Bucks, one of only two all-black Patriot units in the war. After the war, Governor John Hancock
John Hancock
honored Colonel Middleton and his company by presenting him with a flag to commemorate their service
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George Middleton (other)
George Middleton may refer to: George Middleton (activist)
George Middleton (activist)
(1735–1815), African-American Revolutionary War veteran, activist, and Freemason George Middleton (American politician) (1800–1888), New Jersey congressman George H. Middleton (died 1892), Scottish engineer George "Bay" Middleton
George "Bay" Middleton
(1846–1892), British equestrian Sir George Middleton (British politician) (1876–1938), Labour Member of Parliament for Carlisle 1922–1924, 1929–1931 George Middleton (playwright) (1880–1967), American playwright, director, and producer George Middleton (trade unionist) (1898-1971), General Secretary of the Scottish Trades Union Congress Sir George Middleton (diplomat) (1910–1998), British diplomatThis disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name
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Boston Massacre
The Boston
Boston
Massacre, known as the Incident on King Street by the British,[2] was an incident on March 5, 1770, in which British Army soldiers shot and killed several people while under attack by a mob. The incident was heavily publicized by leading Patriots, such as Paul Revere and Samuel Adams, to encourage rebellion against the British authorities.[3][4][5] British troops had been stationed in Boston, capital of the Province of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay, since 1768 in order to protect and support crown-appointed colonial officials attempting to enforce unpopular Parliamentary legislation. Amid ongoing tense relations between the population and the soldiers, a mob formed around a British sentry, who was subjected to verbal abuse and harassment. He was eventually supported by eight additional soldiers, who were subjected to verbal threats and repeatedly hit by clubs, stones and snowballs
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African-American
Origins of the civil rights movement
Origins of the civil rights movement
· Civil rights movement
Civil rights movement
· Black Power movementPost–civil rights era
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Slavery In The Colonial United States
Slavery
Slavery
in the colonial United States (1600–1776) developed from complex factors, and several theories have been proposed to explain development of the trade and institution. Slavery
Slavery
was strongly associated with the European colonies' need for labor, especially for the labor-intensive plantation economies of the sugar colonies in the Caribbean, operated by Great Britain, France, Spain, and the Dutch Republic. Most slaves who were brought or kidnapped to the Thirteen British colonies, which later became the Eastern seaboard of the United States, were imported from the Caribbean, not directly from Africa. They were predominately transported to the Caribbean
Caribbean
islands as a result of the Atlantic slave trade. Indigenous people were also enslaved in the North American colonies, but on a much smaller scale, and Indian slavery ended in the eighteenth century
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John Brown Russwurm
John Brown Russwurm
John Brown Russwurm
(1799–?) was an American abolitionist born in Jamaica
Jamaica
to an English father and enslaved mother. As a child he traveled to the United States
United States
with his father and received a formal education, becoming the first African American to graduate from Bowdoin College. As a young man, Russwurm moved from Portland, Maine, to New York City, where he was a founder with Samuel Cornish of the abolitionist newspaper, Freedom's Journal, the first paper owned and operated by African Americans. Russwurm became supportive of the American Colonization Society's efforts to develop a colony for African Americans in Africa, and he moved in 1829 to what became Liberia. In 1836 Russwurm was selected as governor of Maryland in Africa, a small colony set up nearby by the Maryland State Colonization Society
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National Park Service
The National Park Service
National Park Service
(NPS) is an agency of the United States federal government that manages all national parks, many national monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations.[1] It was created on August 25, 1916, by Congress through the National Park Service
National Park Service
Organic Act[2] and is an agency of the United States Department of the Interior
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Coachman
A coachman is a man whose business it is to drive a coach, a horse-drawn vehicle designed for the conveyance of more than one passenger — and of mail — and covered for protection from the elements. He has also been called a coachee, coachy or whip.Contents1 Historical 2 Hungarian folklore 3 Other uses 4 References 5 External linksHistorical[edit] The term "coachman" is correctly applied to the driver of any type of coach, but it had a specialized meaning before the advent of motor vehicles, as the servant who preceded the chauffeur in domestic service. In a great house, this would have been a specialty, but in more modest households, the coachman would have doubled as the stablehand or groom. In early coaches he sat on a built-in compartment called a boot, bracing his feet on a footrest called a footboard
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Horse Breaking
Horse
Horse
training refers to a variety of practices that teach horses to perform certain behaviors when asked to do so by humans. Horses are trained to be manageable by humans for everyday care as well as for equestrian activities from horse racing to therapeutic horseback riding for people with disabilities. Historically, horses were trained for warfare, farm work, sport and transport. Today, most horse training is geared toward making horses useful for a variety of recreational and sporting equestrian pursuits. Horses are also trained for specialized jobs from movie stunt work to police and crowd control activities, circus entertainment, and equine-assisted psychotherapy. There is tremendous controversy over various methods of horse training and even some of the words used to describe these methods. Some techniques are considered cruel, other methods are considered gentler and more humane
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Violin
The violin, also known informally as a fiddle, is a wooden string instrument in the violin family. Most violins have a hollow wooden body. It is the smallest and highest-pitched instrument in the family in regular use. Smaller violin-type instruments are known, including the violino piccolo and the kit violin, but these are virtually unused. The violin typically has four strings tuned in perfect fifths, and is most commonly played by drawing a bow across its strings, though it can also be played by plucking the strings with the fingers (pizzicato) and by striking the strings with the wooden side of the bow (col legno). Violins are important instruments in a wide variety of musical genres. They are most prominent in the Western classical tradition, both in ensembles (from chamber music to orchestras) and as solo instruments and in many varieties of folk music, including country music, bluegrass music and in jazz
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Boston, Massachusetts
Boston
Boston
(/ˈbɒstən/ ( listen) BOS-tən) is the capital city and most populous municipality[9] of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States
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Massachusetts Historical Society
66000770 [1]Significant datesAdded to NRHP October 15, 1966Designated NHL December 21, 1965The Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Historical Society is a major historical archive specializing in early American, Massachusetts, and New England history
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John Hancock
John Hancock
John Hancock
(January 23, 1737 [O.S. January 12, 1736] – October 8, 1793) was an American merchant, statesman, and prominent Patriot of the American Revolution. He served as president of the Second Continental Congress
Second Continental Congress
and was the first and third Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He is remembered for his large and stylish signature on the United States
United States
Declaration of Independence, so much so that the term John Hancock
John Hancock
has become a synonym in the United States
United States
for one's signature.[2] Before the American Revolution, Hancock was one of the wealthiest men in the Thirteen Colonies, having inherited a profitable mercantile business from his uncle
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Massachusetts Militia
This is a list of militia units of the Colony and later Commonwealth of Massachusetts.Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
(1638) Cogswell's Regiment of Militia (April 19, 1775)
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Moses Grandy
Moses Grandy
Moses Grandy
(c. 1786[nb 1] - unknown), was an African-American author, abolitionist, and, for more than the first four decades of his life, an enslaved person. At eight years of age he became the property of his playmate, James Grandy and two years later he was hired out for work. The monies Moses earned were collected and held until James Grandy turned 21. Grandy helped build the Great Dismal Swamp
Great Dismal Swamp
Canal and learned how to navigate boats. It was that skill that led him to be made commander of several boats that traveled the canal and Pasquotank River, transporting merchandise from Elizabeth City, North Carolina
Elizabeth City, North Carolina
to Norfolk, Virginia. The position allowed him to be better fed, shod and dressed. Able to keep a portion of his earnings, Grandy arranged to buy his freedom twice and twice his owners kept the money and held him in slavery
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Patriot (American Revolution)
Patriots (also known as Revolutionaries, Continentals, Rebels, or American Whigs) were those colonists of the Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
who rebelled against British control during the American Revolution
American Revolution
and in July 1776 declared the United States of America an independent nation. Their rebellion was based on the political philosophy of republicanism, as expressed by spokesmen such as Thomas Jefferson, John Adams
John Adams
and Thomas Paine. They were opposed by the Loyalists who instead supported continued British rule. As a group, Patriots represented a wide array of social, economic and ethnic backgrounds
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