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George Eliot
Mary Anne Evans (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880; alternatively "Mary Ann" or "Marian"), known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist, poet, journalist, translator and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. She is the author of seven novels, including Adam Bede
Adam Bede
(1859), The Mill on the Floss
The Mill on the Floss
(1860), Silas Marner (1861), Middlemarch
Middlemarch
(1871–72), and Daniel Deronda
Daniel Deronda
(1876), most of which are set in provincial England and known for their realism and psychological insight. She used a male pen name, she said, to ensure that her works would be taken seriously. Female authors were published under their own names during Eliot's lifetime, but she wanted to escape the stereotype of women's writing being limited to lighthearted romances
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George Elliot (other)
Disambiguation usually refers to word-sense disambiguation, the process of identifying which meaning of a word is used in context. Disambiguation may also refer to:Sentence boundary disambiguation, the problem in natural language processing of deciding where sentences begin and end Syntactic disambiguation, the problem of resolving syntactic ambiguity Memory disambiguation, a set of microprocessor execution techniquesMusic[edit]Ø (Disambiguation), a 2010 album by Underoath Disambiguation (Pandelis Karayorgis album), a 2002 album by Pandelis Karayorgis and Mat ManeriSee also[edit]Ambiguity, an attribute of any concept, idea, statement or claim whose meaning, intention or interpretation cannot be definitively resolvedThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Disambiguation. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
(May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, philosopher and poet who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States. Emerson gradually moved away from the religious and social beliefs of his contemporaries, formulating and expressing the philosophy of transcendentalism in his 1836 essay "Nature". Following this work, he gave a speech entitled "The American Scholar" in 1837, which Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. considered to be America's "intellectual Declaration of Independence".[3] Emerson wrote most of his important essays as lectures first and then revised them for print
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Attleborough, Warwickshire
Attleborough is an ancient village that dates to before 1150. Owned by Robert, Earl of Leicester and given by him to the Nuns of Chaies-Dieu. Confirirmed by his Son in 1168. Sold by Chaise-Dieu in about 1293 to Nuneaton. On the 'Dissolution' the Manor passed to Sir Marmaduke Constable retaining its separate constitution. (For more history see Dugdale & ex.inf. The Rev. M Knight Nuneaton in Warwickshire in central England. It should not be confused with the larger town of Attleborough in Norfolk. It is about a mile south-east of the town centre. The centre of Attleborough has a village feel to it and contains a number of shops, restaurants, takeaways and pubs the Bull, Fox Inn and Royal Oak a 17-18 C. Coaching Inn. The Holy Trinity Church of England was built in 1842, as a Chapel of Ease of Nuneaton St. Nicholas. Nonconformist Bapist church dates from 1821, Stirct Baptist 1880 and Methodist Church in Hall End
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Low Church
The term "low church" refers to churches which give relatively little emphasis to ritual, sacraments and the authority of clergy. The term is most often used in a liturgical context. The term was initially designed to be pejorative. During the series of doctrinal and ecclesiastic challenges to the established church in the 17th century, commentators and others — who favoured the theology, worship, and hierarchical structure of Anglicanism
Anglicanism
(such as the episcopate) as the true form of Christianity
Christianity
— began referring to that outlook (and the related practices) as "high church"
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Anglican
Anglicanism
Anglicanism
is a Western Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England
Church of England
following the Protestant Reformation.[1] Adherents of Anglicanism
Anglicanism
are called "Anglicans". The majority of Anglicans are members of national or regional ecclesiastical provinces of the international Anglican Communion,[2] which forms the third-largest Christian communion in the world, after the Roman Catholic
Catholic
Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church.[3] They are in full communion with the See of Canterbury, and thus the Archbishop of Canterbury, whom the communion refers to as its primus inter pares (Latin, "first among equals")
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English Midlands
The Midlands
The Midlands
is a cultural and geographic area roughly spanning central England
England
that broadly corresponds to the early medieval Kingdom of Mercia. It borders South East England, South West England, North West England, Yorkshire and Humber, East of England
England
and Wales. Its largest city is Birmingham, and the region was important in the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
of the 18th and 19th centuries. In modern terms the Midlands comprises the English statistical regions of the East Midlands and West Midlands
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English Dissenters
English Dissenters
English Dissenters
or English Separatists
Separatists
were Protestant
Protestant
Christians who separated from the Church of England
Church of England
in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries.[1] A dissenter (from the Latin dissentire, "to disagree") is one who disagrees in opinion, belief and other matters. English Dissenters opposed state interference in religious matters, founded their own churches, educational establishments,[2] and communities. Some emigrated to the New World, especially to the Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
and Canada. Brownists founded the Plymouth colony. English dissenters played a pivotal role in spiritual development of the United States and greatly diversified the religious landscape
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Robert Owen
Robert Owen
Robert Owen
(/ˈoʊən/; 14 May 1771 – 17 November 1858) was a Welsh textile manufacturer, philanthropic social reformer, and one of the founders of utopian socialism and the cooperative movement. Owen is best known for his efforts to improve the working conditions of his factory workers and his promotion of experimental socialistic communities. In the early 1800s Owen became wealthy as an investor and eventual manager of a large textile mill at New Lanark, Scotland. (He initially trained as a draper in Stamford, Lincolnshire, and worked in London, England, before relocating to Manchester
Manchester
in the 1780s and going into business as a textile manufacturer.) In 1824 Owen travelled to America, where he invested the bulk of his fortune in an experimental socialistic community at New Harmony, Indiana, the preliminary model for Owen's utopian society. The experiment was short-lived, lasting about two years
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David Strauss
Strauss, Strau ß
ß
or Straus is a common Germanic surname. Outside Germany and Austria Strau ß
ß
is always spelled Strauss
Strauss
(the letter "ß" is not used in the German-speaking part of Switzerland). In classical music, "Strauss" usually refers to Richard Strauss
Richard Strauss
or Johann Strauss II. The name has been used by families in the Germanic area for at least a thousand years. The overlord of Gröna, for example, went by the name of Struz and used the image of an ostrich as his symbol
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Julian Barnes
Julian Patrick Barnes (born 19 January 1946) is an English writer. Barnes won the Man Booker Prize
Man Booker Prize
for his book The Sense of an Ending (2011), and three of his earlier books had been shortlisted for the Booker Prize: Flaubert's Parrot
Flaubert's Parrot
(1984), England, England
England, England
(1998), and Arthur & George (2005). He has also written crime fiction under the pseudonym Dan Kavanagh. In addition to novels, Barnes has published collections of essays and short stories. In 2004 he became a Commandeur of L'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres
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Geneva
Geneva
Geneva
(/dʒɪˈniːvə/, French: Genève [ʒənɛv], Arpitan: Genèva [dzəˈnɛva], German: Genf [ɡɛnf], Italian: Ginevra [dʒiˈneːvra], Romansh: Genevra) is the second-most populous city in Switzerland
Switzerland
(after Zürich) and is the most populous city of the Romandy, the French-speaking part of Switzerland
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John Chapman (publisher)
Chapman
Chapman
may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Geographical names2.1 Canada 2.2 Australia 2.3 South Africa 2.4 United States 2.5 Space3 GeneralPeople[edit] Chapman
Chapman
(surname) Chapmen, itinerant dealers or ha
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Open Marriage
Open marriage typically refers to a marriage in which the partners agree that each may engage in extramarital sexual relationships, without this being regarded as infidelity. There are many different styles of open marriage (such as swinging and polyamory), each with the partners having varying levels of input on their spouse's activities.Contents1 History of the term 2 Relationship maintenance2.1 Ground rules 2.2 Styles 2.3 Jealousy issues3 Acceptance3.1 Legal issues4 Incidence4.1 Notable people5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory of the term[edit] The origins of the term remain obscure
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Thornton Leigh Hunt
Thornton Leigh Hunt (10 September 1810 – 25 June 1873) was the first editor of the British daily broadsheet newspaper The Daily Telegraph. Life[edit] Hunt was the son of the writer Leigh Hunt and his wife Marianne, née Kent. As a child he lived in Hampstead until the age of twelve, when his father moved the family to Italy for three years in order to edit The Liberal. Though he aspired to become a painter, an allergy to the pigments he was using thwarted Hunt's ambitions, though he did provide eight woodcuts to illustrate his father's poem 'Captain Sword and Captain Pen'.[1] Lacking the ability to become an artist, Hunt instead took up a career in journalism. He was employed as a sub-editor for the Radical publication The Constitutional from 1837 until 1838, where he worked alongside William Makepeace Thackeray and Douglas Jerrold. In 1838 he went north where he worked as an editor for first the Cheshire Reformer, then the Glasgow Argus
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Weimar
Weimar
Weimar
(German pronunciation: [ˈvaɪmaɐ̯]; Latin: Vimaria or Vinaria) is a city in the federal state of Thuringia, Germany. It is located between Erfurt
Erfurt
in the west and Jena
Jena
in the east, approximately 80 kilometres (50 miles) southwest of Leipzig, 170 kilometres (106 miles) north of Nuremberg
Nuremberg
and 170 kilometres (106 miles) west of Dresden
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