HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

George Devol
George Charles Devol Jr. (February 20, 1912 – August 11, 2011) was an American inventor known for developing Unimate, the first material handling robot employed in industrial production work.Contents1 Early life 2 United Cinephone 3 World War II 4 The first industrial robot: Unimate 5 Additional work 6 Death 7 ReferencesEarly life[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (March 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Born in Louisville, Kentucky
Louisville, Kentucky
in 1912, Devol was interested from boyhood in all things electrical and mechanical such as boats, airplanes, and engines. He got some practical experience at Riordan Prep, where, in addition to studying traditional subjects, he helped construct some buildings and run the school's electric light plant
[...More...]

"George Devol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Obituary
An obituary (obit for short) is a news article that reports the recent death of a person, typically along with an account of the person's life and information about the upcoming funeral.[1] In large cities and larger newspapers, obituaries are written only for people considered significant.[1] In local newspapers, an obituary may be published for any local resident upon death. A necrology is a register or list of records of the deaths of people related to a particular organization, group or field, which may only contain the sparsest details, or small obituaries. Historical necrologies can be important sources of information. Two types of paid advertisements are related to obituaries. One, known as a death notice, omits most biographical details and may be a legally required public notice under some circumstances
[...More...]

"Obituary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Programmable Universal Machine For Assembly
The PUMA (Programmable Universal Machine for Assembly, or Programmable Universal Manipulation Arm) is an industrial robotic arm developed by Victor Scheinman at pioneering robot company Unimation. Initially developed for General Motors, the PUMA was based on earlier designs Scheinman invented while at Stanford University. Unimation produced PUMAs for years until being purchased by Westinghouse (ca. 1980), and later by Swiss company Stäubli (1988). Nokia Robotics manufactured about 1500 PUMA robots during the 1980s, the Puma-650 being their most popular model with customers. Some own Nokia Robotics products were also designed, like Nokia NS-16 Industrial Robot or NRS-15[1] . Nokia sold their Robotics division in 1990. In 2002, General Motors Controls, Robotics and Welding (CRW) organization donated the original prototype PUMA robot to the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History
[...More...]

"Programmable Universal Machine For Assembly" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Drum Memory
Drum memory
Drum memory
was a magnetic data storage device invented by Gustav Tauschek in 1932 in Austria.[1][2] Drums were widely used in the 1950s and into the 1960s as computer memory. For many early computers, drum memory formed the main working memory of the computer. It was so common that these computers were often referred to as drum machines.[3] Some drum memories were also used as secondary storage.[4] Drums were displaced as primary computer memory by magnetic core memory which was a better balance of size, speed, cost, reliability and potential for further improvements.[5] Similarly, drums were replaced by hard disk drives for secondary storage, which were also less expensive and denser. The manufacture of drums ceased in the 1970s.Contents1 Design 2 Use and legacy 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksDesign[edit] A drum memory contained a large metal cylinder, coated on the outside surface with a ferromagnetic recording material
[...More...]

"Drum Memory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

General Motors
General Motors
General Motors
Company,[1] commonly abbreviated as GM, is an American multinational corporation headquartered in Detroit
Detroit
that designs, manufactures, markets, and distributes vehicles and vehicle parts, and sells financial services. With global headquarters in Detroit's Renaissance Center, GM manufactures cars and trucks in 35 countries. In 2008, 8.35 million[6] GM cars and trucks were sold globally under various brands. GM reached the milestone of selling 10 million vehicles in 2016.[7] Current auto brands are Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, and Wuling. Former GM automotive brands include Daewoo, McLaughlin, Oakland, Oldsmobile, Pontiac, Hummer, Saab, Saturn, as well as Vauxhall and Opel, which were bought by Groupe PSA
Groupe PSA
in 2017. The company was founded by William C. Durant
William C. Durant
on September 16, 1908 as a holding company
[...More...]

"General Motors" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Die Casting
Die casting
Die casting
is a metal casting process that is characterized by forcing molten metal under high pressure into a mold cavity. The mold cavity is created using two hardened tool steel dies which have been machined into shape and work similarly to an injection mold during the process. Most die castings are made from non-ferrous metals, specifically zinc, copper, aluminium, magnesium, lead, pewter and tin-based alloys
[...More...]

"Die Casting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Spot Welding
Resistance spot welding (RSW)[1] is a process in which contacting metal surface points are joined by the heat obtained from resistance to electric current. It is a subset of electric resistance welding. Work-pieces are held together under pressure exerted by electrodes. Typically the sheets are in the 0.5 to 3 mm (0.020 to 0.118 in) thickness range. The process uses two shaped copper alloy electrodes to concentrate welding current into a small "spot" and to simultaneously clamp the sheets together. Forcing a large current through the spot will melt the metal and form the weld
[...More...]

"Spot Welding" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Inland Fisher Guide Plant (New Jersey)
The Inland Fisher Guide Plant was a General Motors facility located in the West Trenton section of Ewing Township, New Jersey, that opened in 1938 as one of its most modern plants and was operated by the firm for 60 years. The facility was initially part of the Ternstedt division of GM's Fisher Body unit and was used to construct auto parts such as body moldings, door handles and other interior components. During World War II, the facility was converted to build torpedo bombers for the United States Navy as part of GM's Eastern Aircraft. In 1961, the plant was the site of the first industrial robot used in the United States. At the time of its closure in 1998, the plant made auto components for Delphi Automotive. The buildings on the site were demolished
[...More...]

"Inland Fisher Guide Plant (New Jersey)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chrysler
Fiat Chrysler Automobiles
Fiat Chrysler Automobiles
US LLC (commonly known as Chrysler) (/ˈkraɪslər/) is the American subsidiary of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles N.V., an Italian-American automobile manufacturer registered in the Netherlands with headquarters in London, U.K., for tax purposes.[4] FCA US is one of the "Big Three" American automobile manufacturers. FCA US has its headquarters in Auburn Hills, Michigan and sells vehicles worldwide under its flagship Chrysler
Chrysler
brand, as well as the Dodge, Jeep, and Ram Trucks
[...More...]

"Chrysler" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ford
Coordinates: 42°18′53″N 83°12′38″W / 42.31472°N 83.21056°W / 42.31472; -83.21056Ford Motor CompanyGo FurtherThe Ford World Headquarters
Ford World Headquarters
in Dearborn, Michigan, also known as the Glass HouseTypePublicTraded asNYSE: F S&P 100 Component S&P 500 ComponentIndustry AutomotiveFounded June 16, 1903; 114 years ago (1903-06-16)Founder Henry FordHeadquarters Dearborn, Michigan, U.S.Area servedWorldwideKey peopleWilliam C
[...More...]

"Ford" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fiat
Fiat
Fiat
Automobiles S.p.A. (English: /ˈfiːɑːt/; originally FIAT, Italian: Fabbrica Italiana Automobili Torino, lit. 'Italian Automobiles Factory, Turin') is the largest automobile manufacturer in Italy, a subsidiary of FCA Italy S.p.A., which is part of Fiat Chrysler
Chrysler
Automobiles. Fiat
Fiat
Automobiles S.p.A
[...More...]

"Fiat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Victor Scheinman
Victor David Scheinman (December 28, 1942 – September 20, 2016) was a pioneer in the field of robotics born in Augusta, Georgia. He was a graduate of the now-defunct New Lincoln High School in New York. In the late 1950s, and while in high school, Scheinman engineered a speech-to-text machine as a science fair project. In 1969, while at Stanford University, Scheinman invented the Stanford arm,[1] an all-electric, 6-axis articulated robot designed to permit an arm solution in closed form.[2][3] This allowed the robot to accurately follow arbitrary paths in space under computer control and widened the potential use of the robot to more sophisticated applications such as assembly and arc welding. In 1973, Scheinman started Vicarm Inc. to manufacture his robot arms. In 1977, Scheinman sold his design to Unimation, who further developed it, with support from General Motors, as the Programmable Universal Machine for Assembly (PUMA)
[...More...]

"Victor Scheinman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Joseph Engelberger
Joseph Frederick Engelberger (July 26, 1925 – December 1, 2015) was an American physicist, engineer and entrepreneur. Licensing the original patent awarded to inventor George Devol, Engelberger developed the first industrial robot in the United States, the Unimate, in the 1950s. Later, he worked as entrepreneur and vocal advocate of robotic technology beyond the manufacturing plant in a variety of fields, including service industries, health care, and space exploration
[...More...]

"Joseph Engelberger" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Popular Mechanics
Popular Mechanics
Popular Mechanics
is a classic magazine of popular science and technology. Popular Mechanics
Popular Mechanics
was first published by Henry Haven Windsor, January 11, 1902. It has been owned since 1958 by Hearst Communications. There are nine[3] international editions, including a now-defunct Latin American version that had been published for decades, and a newer South African edition. The Russian edition of Popular Mechanics has been issued since 2002
[...More...]

"Popular Mechanics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Society Of Manufacturing Engineers
SME (previously the Society of Manufacturing Engineers) is a non-profit student and professional association for educating and advancing the manufacturing industry in North America.[1][2][3]Contents1 History 2 Four Pillars of Manufacturing Engineering 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] SME was founded in January 1932 at the height of the Great Depression. Originally named the Society of Tool Engineers, and renamed the American Society of Tool Engineers one year later, it was formed by a group of 33 engineers and mechanics gathered at the Detroit College of Applied Science.[4] By April of that year, just four months after its beginning, membership increased from the original 33 members to 200 members and continued to grow rapidly with new chapters popping up across the country.[5] As the economic troubles of the 1930s pushed the world ever-closer to war, Society members responded by helping to convert America's industries into the primary military supplier f
[...More...]

"Society Of Manufacturing Engineers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.