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George Dance The Younger
George Dance the younger, RA (1 April 1741 – 14 January 1825) was an English architect and surveyor as well as a portraitist.[1] The fifth and youngest son of the architect George Dance (the elder), he came from a family of architects, artists and dramatists
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Coleman Street
Coleman Street
Coleman Street
is one of the 25 ancient wards of the City of London. It gives its name to a road linking Gresham Street
Gresham Street
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Chimneypiece
The fireplace mantel or mantelpiece, also known as a chimneypiece, originated in medieval times as a hood that projected over a fire grate to catch the smoke. The term has evolved to include the decorative framework around the fireplace, and can include elaborate designs extending to the ceiling. Mantelpiece is now the general term for the jambs, mantel shelf, and external accessories of a fireplace. For many centuries, the chimneypiece was the most ornamental and most artistic feature of a room, but as fireplaces have become smaller, and modern methods of heating have been introduced, its artistic as well as its practical significance has lessened.Contents1 History1.1 Today2 Styles 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit]Tudor overmantel at Madingley Hall, CambridgeshireUp to the twelfth century, fires were simply made in the middle of a home by a hypocaust, or with braziers, or by fires on the hearth with smoke vented out through the lantern in the roof
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City Of London
The City of London
London
is a city and county that contains the historic centre and the primary central business district (CBD) of London. It constituted most of London
London
from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages, but the agglomeration has since grown far beyond the City's borders.[3][4] The City is now only a tiny part of the metropolis of London, though it remains a notable part of central London. Administratively, it forms one of the 33 local authority districts of Greater London; however, the City of London
London
is not a London
London
borough, a status reserved for the other 32 districts (including London's only other city, the City of Westminster)
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Guarino Guarini
Camillo- Guarino Guarini
Guarino Guarini
(17 January 1624 – 6 March 1683) was an Italian architect of the Piedmontese Baroque, active in Turin
Turin
as well as Sicily, France, and Portugal. He was a Theatine priest, mathematician, and writer.[1][2]Interior Cupola of the Sindone Chapel, TurinContents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References in modern culture 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksBiography[edit] Guarini was born in Modena. He was accepted as a Theatine novice in 1639, spent his novitiate at the monastery of San Silvestro al Quirinale in Rome, and returned to Modena
Modena
in 1647, where he was ordained in 1648. He rose quickly in the Theatine hierarchy, becoming first auditor, then superintendent of works, treasurer, lecturer in philosophy, procuratore, and finally provost in 1654. Prince Alfonso supported another candidate and Guarini was soon replaced and had to leave Modena
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Robert Mylne (architect)
Robert Mylne (4 January 1733 – 5 May 1811) was a Scottish architect and civil engineer, particularly remembered for his design for Blackfriars Bridge
Blackfriars Bridge
in London. Born and raised in Edinburgh, he travelled to Europe as a young man, studying architecture in Rome under Piranesi. In 1758 he became the first Briton to win the triennial architecture competition at the Accademia di San Luca, which made his name known in London, and won him the rivalry of fellow Scot Robert Adam. On his return to Britain, Mylne won the competition to design the new Blackfriars Bridge
Blackfriars Bridge
over the Thames in London, his design being chosen over those of established engineers, such as John Smeaton. He was appointed surveyor to the New River Company, which supplied drinking water to London, and Surveyor of the Fabric of St Paul's Cathedral, where he was responsible for maintaining the building designed by Sir Christopher Wren
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Peter Grant (abbé)
Peter Grant (died 1 September 1784) was a Scottish Roman Catholic priest, agent and abbé, later in life an important liaison for British Catholic visitors in Rome. Life[edit] Grant was born in the diocese of Moray, a member of the Grant family of Blairfind in Glenlivat. He entered the Scotch College at Rome in 1726 and returned to Scotland as a priest in 1735. He was sent to the mission at Glengarry. There he remained till 1737, when, after the murder of the Roman agent Stuart, he was appointed to fill that office. He became acquainted with British travellers who went to Rome, and rendered them many services. For a long period hardly any British subject of distinction visited Rome without being provided with letters of introduction to the Abbé Grant
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Giovanni Battista Piranesi
Giovanni Battista (also Giambattista) Piranesi (Italian pronunciation: [dʒoˈvanni batˈtista piraˈneːzi]; 4 October 1720 – 9 November 1778) was an Italian artist famous for his etchings of Rome
Rome
and of fictitious and atmospheric "prisons" (Le Carceri d'Invenzione).Contents1 Biography 2 The Views (Vedute) 3 The Prisons (Carceri) 4 Archaeologist 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksBiography[edit] Piranesi was born in Mogliano Veneto, near Treviso, then part of the Republic of Venice. His father was a stonemason
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Accademia Di San Luca
The Accademia di San Luca, (the "Academy of Saint Luke") was founded in 1577 as an association of artists in Rome (under the directorship of Federico Zuccari
Federico Zuccari
from 1593[1]), with the purpose of elevating the work of "artists", which included painters, sculptors and architects, above that of mere craftsmen. Other founders included Girolamo Muziano and Pietro Olivieri. The Academy was named after Saint Luke
Saint Luke
the evangelist who, legend has it, made a portrait of the Virgin Mary, and thus became the patron saint of painters' guilds. From the late 16th century until it moved to its present location at the Palazzo Carpegna, it was based in an urban block by the Roman Forum and although these buildings no longer survive, the Academy church of Santi Luca e Martina, does
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Arch Of Constantine
The Arch of Constantine
Arch of Constantine
(Italian: Arco di Costantino) is a triumphal arch in Rome, situated between the Colosseum
Colosseum
and the Palatine Hill
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St. Peter's Basilica
The Papal Basilica
Basilica
of St. Peter
St. Peter
in the Vatican (Italian: Basilica Papale di San Pietro in Vaticano), or simply St. Peter's Basilica (Latin: Basilica
Basilica
Sancti Petri), is an Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance
church in Vatican City, the papal enclave within the city of Rome. Designed principally by Donato Bramante, Michelangelo, Carlo Maderno and Gian Lorenzo Bernini, St. Peter's is the most renowned work of Renaissance architecture[2] and the largest church in the world.[3] While it is neither the mother church of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
nor the cathedral of the Diocese
Diocese
of Rome, St. Peter's is regarded as one of the holiest Catholic shrines
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Temple Of Vesta, Tivoli
The "Temple of Vesta" is a Roman temple
Roman temple
in Tivoli, Italy, dating to the early 1st century BC. Its ruins sit on the acropolis of the city, overlooking the falls of the Aniene
Aniene
that are now included in the Villa Gregoriana. It is not known for certain to whom the temple was dedicated, whether to Hercules, the protecting god of Tibur, or to Albunea, the Tiburtine Sibyl, or to Tiburnus, the eponymous hero of the city, or to Vesta herself, whose more familiar circular peripteral Temple of Vesta
Temple of Vesta
is to be seen in the Roman Forum. A rectangular temple stands nearby, equally difficult to attribute, often called the Temple of the Sibyl".[1] The name of the builder or restorer of the "Temple of Vesta" is Lucius Gellius, memorialized in the inscription on the architrave
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Gravesend, Kent
Gravesend
Gravesend
/ˌɡreɪvzˈɛnd/ is an ancient town in northwest Kent, England, situated 21 miles (35 km) east-southeast of Charing Cross (central London) on the south bank of the Thames Estuary
Thames Estuary
and opposite Tilbury
Tilbury
in Essex. Located in the diocese of Rochester, it is the administrative centre of the Borough of Gravesham. Its geographical situation has given Gravesend
Gravesend
strategic importance throughout the maritime and communications history of South East England
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Parma
Parma
Parma
([ˈparma]  listen (help·info)) (Emilian: Pärma) is a city in the northern Italian region of Emilia-Romagna
Emilia-Romagna
famous for its prosciutto (ham), cheese, architecture, music and surrounding countryside. It is home to the University of Parma, one of the oldest universities in the world. Parma
Parma
is divided into two parts by the stream of the same name. The district on the far side of the river is Oltretorrente. Parma's Etruscan name was adapted by Romans to describe the round shield called Parma. The Italian poet Attilio Bertolucci (born in a hamlet in the countryside) wrote: "As a capital city it had to have a river
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Naples
Naples
Naples
(/ˈneɪpəlz/; Italian: Napoli [ˈnaːpoli] ( listen), Neapolitan: Napule [ˈnɑːpələ] or [ˈnɑːpulə]; Latin: Neapolis; Ancient Greek: Νεάπολις, meaning "new city") is the capital of the Italian region Campania
Campania
and the third-largest municipality in Italy
Italy
after Rome
Rome
and Milan. In 2017, around 967,069 people lived within the city's administrative limits. The Metropolitan City of Naples
Metropolitan City of Naples
had a population of 3,115,320
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David Garrick
David Garrick
David Garrick
(19 February 1717 – 20 January 1779) was an English actor, playwright, theatre manager and producer who influenced nearly all aspects of theatrical practice throughout the 18th century, and was a pupil and friend of Dr Samuel Johnson. He appeared in a number of amateur theatricals, and with his appearance in the title role of Shakespeare's Richard III, audiences and managers began to take notice. Impressed by his portrayals of Richard III and a number of other roles, Charles Fleetwood engaged Garrick for a season at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane. He remained with the Drury Lane
Drury Lane
company for the next five years and purchased a share of the theatre with James Lacy. This purchase inaugurated 29 years of Garrick's management of the Drury Lane, during which time it rose to prominence as one of the leading theatres in Europe
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