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George Braziller
George Braziller (February 12, 1916[1] – March 16, 2017)[2] was an American book publisher and the founder of George Braziller, Inc., a firm known for its literary and artistic books and its publication of foreign authors.[3] Life and career[edit] Braziller became interested in publishing while he was working as a shipping clerk,[4] his first job,[5] during the Great Depression. In the 1940s, he founded the Book Find Club, which was smaller than the Book of the Month Club but exceedingly successful, “with a reputation for seriousness of purpose.”[3] After the end of World War II, he sold the Book Find Club to Time–Life
Time–Life
Publishing and put half of the proceeds into the publishing firm he founded in the mid-1950s
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Lat
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Great Depression
The Great Depression
Great Depression
was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s.[1] It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century.[2] In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.[3] The Great Depression
Great Depression
started in the United States
United States
after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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SNAC
SNAC, or Social Networks and Archival Context, is an online effort for discovering, locating, and using distributed historical records started by a collaboration of United States-based organizations. It was established in 2010, with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA),[1] California Digital Library (CDL), Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) at the University of Virginia and the University of California, Berkeley School of Information.[2][3] See also[edit] Archival Resource Key (ARK)References[edit]^ Ferriero, David (2015-08-18). "Introducing SNAC". National Archives - AOTUS blog. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ "SNAC: Social Networks and Archival Context". socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ Larson, Ray R.; Pitti, Daniel; Turner, Adrian (2014)
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Salmagundi Club
The Salmagundi Club, sometimes referred to as the Salmagundi Art Club, is a fine arts center located in New York City. It was founded in 1871 in the Greenwich Village
Greenwich Village
section of Manhattan, New York City. Since 1917, it has been located at 47 Fifth Avenue. As of 2014[update], its membership roster totals roughly 900 members.[2] The Salmagundi Club has served as a center for fine arts, artists and collectors, with art exhibitions, art classes, artist demonstrations, art auctions and many other types of events. It is also a sponsor of the United States Coast Guard
United States Coast Guard
Art Program (COGAP).[3]Contents1 History 2 Membership 3 Club presidents 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] It was founded in 1871
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The New York Sun
The New York Sun
The New York Sun
was an American[1][2] daily newspaper published in Manhattan
Manhattan
from 2002 to 2008. It debuted on April 16, 2002, adopting the name, motto, and masthead of the earlier New York paper, The Sun (1833–1950). It became the first general-interest broadsheet newspaper to be started in New York City in several decades. Its op-ed page became a prominent platform in the country for conservative viewpoints. Since 2009 The Sun has operated as an online-only publisher of political and economic opinion pieces, as well as occasional arts content.Contents1 History 2 Editorial
Editorial
perspective and reception 3 Features 4 Financial problems, circulation, and end of print run 5 Online version 2009–present 6 Related publication 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The Sun was founded by a group of investors including publishing magnate Conrad Black
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Nouveau Roman
The Nouveau Roman (French pronunciation: ​[nuvo ʁɔmɑ̃], new novel) is a type of 1950s French novel that diverged from classical literary genres. Émile Henriot coined the term in an article in the popular French newspaper Le Monde
Le Monde
on May 22, 1957[1] to describe certain writers who experimented with style in each novel, creating an essentially new style each time
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Princeton University
Princeton University
Princeton University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Princeton, New Jersey
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Friedrich Dürrenmatt
Friedrich Dürrenmatt
Friedrich Dürrenmatt
(German: [ˈfriːdrɪç ˈdʏrənˌmat]; 5 January 1921 – 14 December 1990) was a Swiss author and dramatist. He was a proponent of epic theatre whose plays reflected the recent experiences of World War II. The politically active author's work included avant-garde dramas, philosophical crime novels, and macabre satire. Dürrenmatt was a member of the Gruppe Olten. Contents1 Early life 2 Dramatic works 3 Later life 4 Selected bibliography 5 Dürrenmatt's stories in film 6 Adaptations 7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Dürrenmatt was born in Konolfingen, canton of Bern, the son of a Protestant pastor. His grandfather, Ulrich Dürrenmatt, was a conservative politician. The family moved to Bern
Bern
in 1935
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Eugène Ionesco
Eugène Ionesco
Eugène Ionesco
(born Eugen Ionescu, Romanian: [e.uˈd͡ʒen i.oˈnesku] ( listen); 26 November 1909 – 28 March 1994) was a Romanian-French playwright who wrote mostly in French, and one of the foremost figures of the French Avant-garde theatre
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Henri Michaux
Henri Michaux (French: [miʃo]; 24 May 1899 – 19 October 1984) was a highly idiosyncratic Belgian-born poet, writer, and painter who wrote in French. He later took French citizenship. Michaux is best known for his esoteric books written in a highly accessible style. His body of work includes poetry, travelogues, and art criticism. Michaux travelled widely, tried his hand at several careers, and experimented with psychedelic drugs, especially LSD
LSD
and mescaline,[1] which resulted in two of his most intriguing works, Miserable Miracle and The Major Ordeals of the Mind and the Countless Minor Ones.Contents1 Travels and work 2 Bibliography 3 References 4 External linksTravels and work[edit] In 1930–1931, Henri Michaux visited Japan, China and India. The result of this trip is the book A Barbarian in Asia. Oriental culture became one of his biggest influences
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Albert Camus
Albert Camus
Albert Camus
(/kæˈmuː/;[2] French: [albɛʁ kamy] ( listen); 7 November 1913 – 4 January 1960) was a French philosopher, author, and journalist. His views contributed to the rise of the philosophy known as absurdism. He wrote in his essay The Rebel that his whole life was devoted to opposing the philosophy of nihilism while still delving deeply into individual freedom. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature
Nobel Prize in Literature
at the age of 43 in 1957, the second youngest recipient in history.[3] Camus did not consider himself to be an existentialist despite usually being classified as a follower of it, even in his lifetime.[4] In a 1945 interview, Camus rejected any ideological associations: "No, I am not an existentialist
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Alexander Calder
Alexander Calder
Alexander Calder
(/ˈkɔːldər/; July 22, 1898 – November 11, 1976) is widely considered to be one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. He is best known for his colorful, whimsical abstract public sculptures and his innovative mobiles, kinetic sculptures powered by motors or air currents, which embraced chance in their aesthetic. Born into a family of accomplished artists, Calder's work first gained attention in Paris in the 1930s and was soon championed by the Museum of Modern Art
Museum of Modern Art
in New York, resulting in a retrospective exhibition in 1943. Major retrospectives were also held at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
(1964) and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (1974)
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