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Geoffrey Of Monmouth
Geoffrey of Monmouth
Monmouth
(Latin: Galfridus Monemutensis, Galfridus Arturus, Welsh: Gruffudd ap Arthur, Sieffre o Fynwy ; c.1095- c.1155) was a British cleric and one of the major figures in the development of British historiography and the popularity of tales of King Arthur. He is best known for his chronicle The History of the Kings of Britain (Latin: De gestis Britonum or Historia regum Britanniae),[1] which was widely popular in its day, being translated into various other languages from its original Latin
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Archbishop Of Canterbury
The Archbishop of Canterbury
Canterbury
is the senior bishop and principal leader of the Church of England, the symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Canterbury. The current archbishop is Justin Welby, who was enthroned at Canterbury Cathedral on 21 March 2013. Welby is the 105th in a line which goes back more than 1400 years to Augustine of Canterbury, the "Apostle to the English", sent from Rome
Rome
in the year 597. Welby succeeded Rowan Williams.[1] From the time of Augustine until the 16th century, the Archbishops of Canterbury
Canterbury
were in full communion with the See of Rome
Rome
and usually received the pallium from the Pope. During the English Reformation, the Church of England
Church of England
broke away from the authority of the Catholic Church
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De Excidio Et Conquestu Britanniae
De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae
De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae
( Latin
Latin
for "On the Ruin and Conquest of Britain", sometimes just "On the Ruin of Britain") is a work by the 6th-century AD British cleric St Gildas. It is a sermon in three parts condemning the acts of Gildas' contemporaries, both secular and religious, whom he blames for the dire state of affairs in sub-Roman Britain. It is one of the most important sources for the history of Britain in the 5th and 6th centuries, as it is the only significant source for the period written by a near contemporary of the people and events described. Part I contains a narrative of British history from the Roman conquest to Gildas' time; it includes references to Ambrosius Aurelianus
Ambrosius Aurelianus
and the Britons' victory against the Saxons
Saxons
at the Battle of Mons Badonicus
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Canon (priest)
A canon (from the Latin
Latin
canonicus, itself derived from the Greek κανονικός, kanonikós, "relating to a rule", "regular") is a member of certain bodies subject to an ecclesiastical rule. Originally, a canon was a cleric living with others in a clergy house or, later, in one of the houses within the precinct of or close to a cathedral and conducting his life according to the orders or rules of the church. This way of life grew common (and is first documented) in the eighth century. In the eleventh century, some churches required clergy thus living together to adopt the rule first proposed by Saint Augustine that they renounce private wealth
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Lambeth
Lambeth
Lambeth
(/ˈlæmbəθ/)[1]. It is situated 1 mile (1.6 km) south of Charing Cross. The population of the London Borough of Lambeth
London Borough of Lambeth
was 303,086 in 2011.[2] The area experienced some slight growth in the medieval period as part of the manor of Lambeth
Lambeth
Palace. In Elizabethan times the area was known as L’amberth. (Map named Londinum Feracissumi Angliae Regni Metropolis) By the Victorian era the area had seen significant development as London expanded, with dense industrial, commercial and residential buildings located adjacent to one another. The changes brought by World War II
World War II
altered much of the fabric of Lambeth. Subsequent development in the late 20th century and early 21st century has seen an increase in the number of high-rise buildings
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Roman Catholic
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Benedictine
The Order of Saint Benedict
Order of Saint Benedict
(OSB; Latin: Ordo Sancti Benedicti), also known – in reference to the colour of its members' habits – as the Black Monks, is a Catholic religious order
Catholic religious order
of independent monastic communities that observe the Rule of Saint Benedict. Each community (monastery, priory or abbey) within the order maintains its own autonomy, while the order itself represents their mutual interests
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Breton People
The Bretons
Bretons
(Breton: Bretoned, Breton pronunciation: [breˈtɔ̃nɛt]) are an ethnic group located in the region of Brittany
Brittany
in France. They trace much of their heritage to groups of Brittonic speakers who immigrated from southwestern Great Britain, particularly Cornwall
Cornwall
and Devon, to expand their territory onto the continent. They also descend in some parts from Vikings. They migrated in waves from the 3rd to 9th century (most heavily from 450–600) into Armorica, which was subsequently named Brittany
Brittany
after them.[7] The main traditional language of Brittany
Brittany
is Breton (Brezhoneg), spoken in Lower Brittany
Brittany
(i.e
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William The Conqueror
William I[a] (c. 1028[1] – 9 September 1087), usually known as William the Conqueror
William the Conqueror
and sometimes William the Bastard,[2][b] was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087. A descendant of Rollo, he was Duke
Duke
of Normandy
Normandy
(as William II) from 1035 onward. After a long struggle to establish his power, by 1060 his hold on Normandy
Normandy
was secure, and he launched the Norman conquest of England
Norman conquest of England
six years later. The rest of his life was marked by struggles to consolidate his hold over England and his continental lands and by difficulties with his eldest son. William was the son of the unmarried Robert I, Duke
Duke
of Normandy, by Robert's mistress Herleva
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Frank Merry Stenton
Sir Frank Merry Stenton (17 May 1880 – 15 September 1967) was a 20th-century historian of Anglo-Saxon England, and president of the Royal Historical Society (1937–1945).[1] He was the author of Anglo-Saxon England, a volume of the Oxford History of England, first published in 1943 and widely considered a classic history of the period. He delivered the Ford Lectures
Ford Lectures
at Oxford University
Oxford University
in 1929. Stenton was a professor of history at the University of Reading (1926-1946), and subsequently the university's vice-chancellor (1946-1950). During Stenton's period as vice-chancellor at Reading, he presided over the university's purchase of Whiteknights Park, creating the new campus that allowed for the expansion of the university in later decades
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Owain Gwynedd
Owain ap Gruffudd (c. 1100 – 23 or 28 November 1170) was King of Gwynedd, North Wales, from 1137 until his death in 1170, succeeding his father Gruffudd ap Cynan. He was called "Owain the Great" (Welsh: Owain Mawr) [1] and the first to be styled "Prince of Wales".[2] He is considered to be the most successful of all the North Welsh princes prior to his grandson, Llywelyn the Great
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Walter Map
Walter Map (Latin: Gualterius Mappus; 1140 – c. 1210) was a medieval writer of works written in Latin. Only one work is attributed to Map with any certainty: De Nugis Curialium.Contents1 Life 2 Writings 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] He claimed Welsh origin[1] and to be a man of the Welsh Marches (marchio sum Walensibus);[2] He studied at the University of Paris, apparently around 1160 when Gerard la Pucelle was teaching there. He encountered Thomas Becket
Thomas Becket
before 1162. As a courtier of King Henry II of England, he was sent on missions to Louis VII of France
Louis VII of France
and to Pope Alexander III, probably attending the Third Lateran Council
Third Lateran Council
in 1179 and encountering a delegation of Waldensians
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Cambro-Norman
Cambro- Normans
Normans
were Normans
Normans
who settled in southern Wales
Wales
after the Norman conquest of England
Norman conquest of England
in 1066. Some Irish historians prefer this term over Anglo-Norman for the Normans
Normans
who invaded Ireland after 1170 since many of them originated in Wales.[1] Contemporary Irish accounts of this period simply called the incomers Saxain, which means "Saxon", i.e
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Lincoln, Lincolnshire
Lincoln (/ˈlɪŋkən/ LIN-kən) is a cathedral city and the county town of Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
in the East Midlands
East Midlands
of England. The non-metropolitan district of Lincoln had a 2012 population of 94,600.[5] The 2011 census gave the urban area of Lincoln, which includes North Hykeham
North Hykeham
and Waddington, a population of 130,200.[6][7] The Roman town of Lindum Colonia
Lindum Colonia
developed from an Iron Age settlement. Lincoln's major landmarks are Lincoln Cathedral, a famous example of English Gothic architecture, and Lincoln Castle, an 11th-century Norman castle
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Age Of Majority
The age of majority is the threshold of adulthood as recognized or declared in law. It is the moment when minors cease to be considered such and assume legal control over their persons, actions, and decisions, thus terminating the control and legal responsibilities of their parents or guardian over them. Most countries set the age of majority at 18. The word majority here refers to having greater years and being of full age as opposed to minority, the state of being a minor. The law in a given jurisdiction may not actually use the term "age of majority". The term typically refers to a collection of laws bestowing the status of adulthood
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Welsh Marches
The Welsh Marches (Welsh: Y Mers) is an imprecisely defined area along and around the border between England and Wales
Wales
in the United Kingdom. The precise meaning of the term has varied at different periods. Historically, the English term Welsh March (in Medieval Latin Marchia Walliae)[1] was originally used in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
to denote the marches between England and the Principality of Wales, in which Marcher lords had specific rights, exercised to some extent independently of the king of England
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