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Genk
Genk
Genk
(Dutch pronunciation: [ɣɛŋk]) is a city and municipality located in the Belgian province of Limburg near Hasselt. The municipality only comprises the city of Genk
Genk
itself. It is one of the most important industrial cities in Flanders, located on the Albert Canal, between Antwerp
Antwerp
and Liège. 54% of the inhabitants are of foreign origin from about 85 different nationalities, mostly Italians, Turks, and Greeks.[2]Contents1 History1.1 Celtic and medieval origins 1.2 19th century 1.3 20th century development2 Economy2.1 C-Mine3 Sights 4 Events 5 Transportation 6 Sports 7 Famous and notable inhabitants 8 Twin cities 9 Gallery 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit] Celtic and medieval origins[edit] Genk
Genk
probably originated as a Celtic village, and was converted to Christianity in the 10th century
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Martin Of Tours
Saint Martin
Saint Martin
of Tours
Tours
(Latin: Sanctus Martinus Turonensis; 316 or 336 – 8 November 397) was Bishop of Tours, whose shrine in France
France
became a famous stopping-point for pilgrims on the road to Santiago de Compostela
Santiago de Compostela
in Spain. He has become one of the most familiar and recognizable Christian
Christian
saints, sometimes venerated as a military saint. As he was born in what is now Szombathely, Hungary, spent much of his childhood in Pavia, Italy, and lived most of his adult life in France, he is considered a spiritual bridge across Europe.[1] His life was recorded by a contemporary, the hagiographer Sulpicius Severus. Some of the accounts of his travels may have been interpolated into his vita to validate early sites of his cult
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Open-air Museum
An open-air museum (or open air museum) is a museum that exhibits collections of buildings and artifacts out-of-doors. They are also frequently known as museums of buildings or folk museums. The concept of an open-air museum originated in Scandinavia
Scandinavia
in the late 19th century and spread widely. A comprehensive history of the open-air museum as an idea and institution can be found in Swedish museologist Sten Rentzhog's 2007 book Open Air Museums: The History and Future of a Visionary Idea. Living history
Living history
museums, including living farm museums and living museums, open-air museums where costumed interpreters portray period life in an earlier era. The interpreters act as if they are living in a different time and place and perform everyday household tasks, crafts, and occupations. The goal is to demonstrate older lifestyles and pursuits to modern audiences
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National Park
A national park is a park in use for conservation purposes. Often it is a reserve of natural, semi-natural, or developed land that a sovereign state declares or owns. Although individual nations designate their own national parks differently, there is a common idea: the conservation of 'wild nature' for posterity and as a symbol of national pride.[1] An international organization, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and its World Commission on Protected Areas, has defined "National Park" as its Category II type of protected areas. While this type of national park had been proposed previously, the United States established the first "public park or pleasuring-ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people", Yellowstone National Park, in 1872.[2] Although Yellowstone was not officially termed a "national park" in its establishing law, it was always termed such in practice[3] and is widely held to be the first and oldest national park in the world
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Dutch Language
 Aruba  Belgium  Curaçao  Netherlands  Sint Maarten  Suriname Benelux European Union South American Union CaricomRegulated by Nederlandse Taalunie (Dutch Language Union)Language codesISO 639-1 nlISO 639-2 dut (B) nld (T)ISO 639-3 nld Dutch/FlemishGlottolog mode1257[4]Linguasphere 52-ACB-aDutch-speaking world (included are areas of daughter-language Afrikaans)Distribution of the Dutch language
Dutch language
and its dialects in Western EuropeThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Planetarium
A planetarium (plural planetaria or planetariums) is a theatre built primarily for presenting educational and entertaining shows about astronomy and the night sky, or for training in celestial navigation.[1][2][3] A dominant feature of most planetaria is the large dome-shaped projection screen onto which scenes of stars, planets and other celestial objects can be made to appear and move realistically to simulate the complex 'motions of the heavens'. The celestial scenes can be created using a wide variety of technologies, for example precision-engineered 'star balls' that combine optical and electro-mechanical technology, slide projector, video and fulldome projector systems, and lasers. Whatever technologies are used, the objective is normally to link them together to provide an accurate relative motion of the sky
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Esbjörn Svensson Trio
Esbjörn Svensson Trio (or e.s.t.) was a Swedish jazz piano trio formed in 1993 consisting of Esbjörn Svensson (piano), Dan Berglund (double bass), and Magnus Öström (drums). Its music has classical, rock, pop, and techno elements. It lists classical composer Béla Bartók and rock band Radiohead as influences. Its style involves conventional jazz and the use of electronic effects and multitrack recording.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Awards 3 Discography3.1 Albums4 Also appear on 5 Collaborations 6 Literature 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit] The trio deliberately blurred genres, with Svensson's musical catholicism drawing upon a wide variety of artist influences.[2] e.s.t. was also renowned for its vibrant style in live performances, often playing in rock and roll oriented venues to young crowds. It achieved great commercial success and critical acclaim throughout Europe
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André Dumont
André Hubert Dumont (15 February 1809 – 28 February 1857) was a Belgian geologist. Dumont was born in Liège. His first work was a masterly Mémoire on the geology of the province of Liège published in 1832. A few years later he became a professor of mineralogy and geology and afterwards Rector of the University of Liège. He subsequently turned his attention to the mineralogical and stratigraphical description of the geological formations in Belgium
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Municipalities Of Belgium
Belgium
Belgium
comprises 589 municipalities (Dutch: gemeenten; French: communes; German: Gemeinden) grouped into five provinces in each of two regions and into a third region, the Brussels-Capital Region, comprising 19 municipalities that do not belong to a province. In most cases, the municipalities are the smallest administrative subdivisions of Belgium, but in municipalities with more than 100,000 inhabitants, on the initiative of the local council, sub-municipal administrative entities with elected councils may be created. As such, only Antwerp, having over 500,000 inhabitants, became subdivided into nine districts (Dutch: districten)
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Prince-Bishopric Of Liège
The Prince-Bishopric of Liège[2] was a state of the Holy Roman Empire in the Low Countries, situated for the most part in present Belgium, which was ruled by the Bishop of Liège. As a prince, the Bishop held an Imperial Estate and had seat and voice at the Imperial Diet. The Prince-Bishopric of Liège should not be confused with the Bishop's diocese of Liège, which was larger. The bishops of Liège acquired their status as a Prince-bishop between 980 and 985 when Bishop Notger, who had been the bishop of Liege since 972, received secular control of the County of Huy from Otto II, Holy Roman Emperor. The Prince-Bishopric belonged from 1500 on to the Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle. Its territory included most of the present Belgian provinces of Liège and Limburg, and some exclaves in other parts of Belgium and the Netherlands. It briefly became a republic (the Republic of Liège) from 1789 to 1791, before reverting to a Prince-Bishopric in 1791
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County Of Loon
The County of Loon (Dutch: Graafschap Loon, French: Comté de Looz) was a province of the ancien regime Holy Roman Empire, which by 1190 came under the overlordship of the Prince-bishop of Liège.[1] It lay north of Liège and west of the Maas river (French: Meuse) in present-day Flemish-speaking Belgium. Loon's first definite count was brother to a bishop of Liège, and over generations the county grew and then came under direct control of the bishops, as their largest Dutch-speaking secular lordship
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Rolduc
Rolduc is the name of a medieval abbey in Kerkrade, the Netherlands, which is now a Roman Catholic seminary and an affiliated conferencing center. The abbey is a rijksmonument.[1] It is part of the Top 100 Dutch heritage sites, established in 1990 by the Department for Conservation.Contents1 History 2 Description 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] In 1104, a young priest by the name of Ailbertus of Antoing founded an Augustinian abbey in the Land of Rode, near the river Wurm. The abbey was called Kloosterrade, which later became 's-Hertogenrade (in French: Rode-le-Duc or Rolduc), after the ducal castle that was built across the Wurm. Ailbertus died in 1111 and his bones were later interred in the crypt. In 1136 the land of Rode, including the abbey, fell into the hands of the Duchy of Limburg. Kloosterrade was considered to be their family church. Several dukes of Limburg are buried at Rolduc, such as Walram III, whose cenotaph can be found in the nave of the church
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Celt
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle Dnieper Bronze
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Joshua Redman
Joshua Redman
Joshua Redman
(born February 1, 1969) is an American jazz saxophonist and composer. In 1991, he won the Thelonious Monk International Jazz
Jazz
Saxophone Competition.[1]Contents1 Life and career 2 2000s 3 Discography3.1 As leader 3.2 With James Farm 3.3 As sideman4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Joshua Redman
Joshua Redman
was born in Berkeley, California, to jazz saxophonist Dewey Redman
Dewey Redman
and dancer and librarian Renee Shedroff.[2] He was exposed to many kinds of music at the Center for World Music in Berkeley, where his mother studied South Indian dance. Some of his earliest lessons in music and improvisation were on recorder with gamelan player Jody Diamond
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