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Generalplan Ost
The Generalplan Ost
Generalplan Ost
(German pronunciation: [ɡenəˈʁaːlˌplaːn ˈɔst]; English: Master Plan for the East), abbreviated GPO, was the German government's plan for the genocide and ethnic cleansing on a vast scale, and colonization of Central and Eastern Europe
Central and Eastern Europe
by Germans. It was to be undertaken in territories occupied by Germany during World War II
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Humboldt University Of Berlin
The Humboldt University
Humboldt University
of Berlin
Berlin
(German: Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, abbreviated HU Berlin), established in 1810,[4] is a university in the central borough of Mitte
Mitte
in Berlin, Germany. It was established by Frederick William III on the initiative of Wilhelm von Humboldt as the University of Berlin, making it the oldest of Berlin's four universities.[n 1] The university is divided into nine faculties, including its medical school shared with the Free University of Berlin, has a student enrollment of around 32,000 students, and offers degree programmes in some 189 disciplines from undergraduate to postdoctorate level.[5] Its main campus is located on the Unter den Linden
Unter den Linden
boulevard in central Berlin
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Obergruppenführer
Obergruppenführer
Obergruppenführer
([ˈoːbɐɡʀʊpn̩fyːʀɐ], "senior group leader") was a Nazi Party
Nazi Party
paramilitary rank that was first created in 1932 as a rank of the Sturmabteilung
Sturmabteilung
(SA), and adopted by the Schutzstaffel
Schutzstaffel
(SS) one year later. Until April 1942, it was the highest commissioned SS rank, inferior only to Reichsführer-SS ( Heinrich Himmler
Heinrich Himmler
or RFSS, which was the internal SS-abbreviation for Himmler)[1] Translated as "senior group leader",[2] the rank of Obergruppenführer
Obergruppenführer
was senior to Gruppenführer.[3] A similarly named rank of Untergruppenführer existed in the SA from 1929 to 1930 and as a title until 1933
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Reich Ministry For The Occupied Eastern Territories
The Reich Ministry for the Occupied Eastern Territories (German: Reichsministerium für die besetzten Ostgebiete or RMfdbO) was created by Adolf Hitler in July 1941 and headed by the Nazi theoretical expert and Baltic German, Alfred Rosenberg. Alfred Meyer served as Rosenberg's deputy. This ministry was created to control the vast areas captured by the Germans in Eastern Europe and Russia. It also played a part in supporting anti-Soviet groups in Central Asia. In February 1942, under Rosenberg's plans, the Ministry tried to promulgate a program of land reform in the occupied territories in the USSR that included promises of decollectivization through the abolition of kolkhozes and the re-distribution of land to peasants for individual farming. Germany established two Reichskommissariats, for Ostland and Ukraine, and planned for two more, for Moscow and for the Caucasus
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Standartenführer
Standartenführer
Standartenführer
([ʃtanˈdaʁtn̩.fyːʀɐ], "standard leader") was a Nazi Party
Nazi Party
(NSDAP) paramilitary rank that was used in several NSDAP organizations, such as the SA, SS, NSKK and the NSFK.[1][2] First founded as a title in 1925, in 1928 the rank became one of the first commissioned NSDAP ranks and was bestowed upon those SA and SS officers who commanded units known as Standarten which were regiment-sized formations of between three hundred and five hundred men.[1] In 1929 the rank of Standartenführer
Standartenführer
was divided into two separate ranks known as Standartenführer
Standartenführer
(I) and Standartenführer
Standartenführer
(II)
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Hans Ehlich
Hans Ehlich (born 1 July 1901, in Leipzig – 30 March 1991 in Braunschweig) was a doctor and SS-Standartenführer (colonel) of Nazi Germany during World War II. He was the commander of Amtsgruppe III B Volkstum und Volksgesundheit in the Sicherheitsdienst (SD) in occupied Poland. Career[edit] Ehlich began his studies in medicine and dentistry in Leipzig and Würzburg. Around 1923, Ehlich became involved with various right wing movements, and took part in preparations for Hitler's November putsch in 1923 in Munich. After passing his medical exams, Ehlich took up a position in 1927 as a physician in the City Hospital in Johannstadt, Dresden. He joined the Nazi Party on 1 December 1931. In February 1932, he opened a private medical practice. Shortly before end of war in Berlin, the remaining officers in the RSHA, including Ehlich destroyed incriminating documents and established new identities
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Subsequent Nuremberg Trials
The subsequent Nuremberg
Nuremberg
trials (formally the Trials of War Criminals before the Nuremberg
Nuremberg
Military Tribunals) were a series of twelve U.S. military tribunals for war crimes against members of the leadership of Nazi Germany, held in the Palace of Justice, Nuremberg, after World War II from 1946 to 1949 following the Trial of the Major War Criminals before the International Military Tribunal.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Trials 3 Result 4 Criticism4.1 Conduct of the prosecution5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBackground[edit] Although it had been initially planned to hold more than just one international trial at the IMT, the growing differences between the victorious allies (the United States, United Kingdom, France, and Soviet Union) made this impossible. However, the Control Council Law No
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Reich Commission For The Strengthening Of Germandom
The Reich Commissioner for the Consolidation of German Nationhood (German: Reichskommissar für die Festigung deutschen Volkstums, RKF, RKFDV) was an office in Nazi Germany which was held by Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler.[1] Adolf Hitler in his October 7 1939 order Erlaß des Führers und Reichskanzlers zur Festigung deutschen Volkstums ordered Himmler to carry out the following duties:[2]Overseeing of the final return to the Reich of the Volksdeutsche and Auslandsdeutsche (Reichsdeutsche who live abroad) Prevention of "harmful influence" of populations alien to the German Volkstum Creation of new populated areas settled by Germans, mostly by the returning ones.References[edit]^ [Robert L. Koehl, RKFDV: German Resettlement and Population Policy 1939–1945. A History of the Reichskommission for the Strengthening of Germandom
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Rudolf Hess
Rudolf Walter Richard Hess (Heß in German; 26 April 1894 – 17 August 1987), was a prominent politician in Nazi Germany. Appointed Deputy Führer to Adolf Hitler
Adolf Hitler
in 1933, he served in this position until 1941, when he flew solo to Scotland in an attempt to negotiate peace with the United Kingdom during World War II. He was taken prisoner and eventually was convicted of crimes against peace, serving a life sentence until his suicide. Hess enlisted as an infantryman at the outbreak of World War I. He was wounded several times over the course of the war and was awarded the Iron Cross, 2nd class, in 1915. Shortly before the war ended, Hess enrolled to train as an aviator, but he saw no action in this role
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Jewish Question
The Jewish question
Jewish question
was a wide-ranging debate in 19th- and 20th-century European society pertaining to the appropriate status and treatment of Jews
Jews
in society. The debate was similar to other so-called "national questions" and dealt with the civil, legal, national and political status of Jews
Jews
as a minority within society, particularly in Europe
Europe
in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. The debate started within societies, politicians and writers in western and central Europe
Europe
influenced by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
and the ideals of the French Revolution. The issues included the legal and economic Jewish disabilities (e.g
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Defeat At Stalingrad
Decisive Soviet victory[1]Destruction of the German 6th ArmyTerritorial changes Expulsion of the Germans from the Caucasus, reversing their gains from the 1942 Summer CampaignBelligerents Germany  Romania  Italy  Hungary  Croatia Soviet UnionCommanders and leaders Adolf Hitler Friedrich Paulus  Erich von Manstein W.F. von Richthofen Petre Dumitrescu C. Constantinescu Italo Gariboldi Gusztáv Jány Georgy Zhukov Nikolay Voronov A.M. Vasilevsky Andrey Yeryomenko Nikita Khrushchev K.K
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Memorandum
A memorandum (abbrev.: memo; from Latin
Latin
memorandum est, "It must be remembered (that)...") is a note, document or other communication that helps the memory by recording events or observations on a topic such as may be used in a business office. The plural form of the Latin
Latin
noun memorandum so derived is properly memoranda, but if the word is deemed to have become a word of the English language, the plural memorandums, abbreviated to memos, may be used. (See also Agenda, Corrigenda, Addenda). A memorandum can have only a certain number of formats; it may have a format specific to an office or institution. In law specifically, a memorandum is a record of the terms of a transaction or contract, such as a policy memo, memorandum of understanding, memorandum of agreement, or memorandum of association. Alternative formats include memos, briefing notes, reports, letters, binders, etc. They could be one page long or many
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Abstract (summary)
An abstract is a brief summary of a research article, thesis, review, conference proceeding, or any in-depth analysis of a particular subject and is often used to help the reader quickly ascertain the paper's purpose.[1] When used, an abstract always appears at the beginning of a manuscript or typescript, acting as the point-of-entry for any given academic paper or patent application. Abstracting and indexing services for various academic disciplines are aimed at compiling a body of literature for that particular subject. The terms précis or synopsis are used in some publications to refer to the same thing that other publications might call an "abstract"
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Armenian Genocide
European colonization of the AmericasDzungar genocide, 1750s Manifest DestinyIndian Removal, 1830s California Genocide, 1848–1873Circassian genocide, 1860s Selk'nam genocide, 1890s–1900s Herero and Namaqua genocide, 1904–1907 Greek genocide, 1914–1923 Assyrian genocide, 1914–1925 Armenian Genocide, 1915–1923 Libyan Genocide, 1923–1932Soviet genocide Ethnic cleansing
Ethnic cleansing
in the Soviet UnionSoviet famine of 1932–33Holodomor, 1931–1933 Kazakhstan, 1930–1933Mass Deportations during World War IIKalmyks, 1943
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Berghof (residence)
The Berghof was Adolf Hitler's home in the Obersalzberg
Obersalzberg
of the Bavarian Alps
Bavarian Alps
near Berchtesgaden, Bavaria, Germany. Other than the Wolfsschanze ("Wolf's Lair"), his headquarters in East Prussia
East Prussia
for the invasion of the Soviet Union, Hitler
Hitler
spent more time at the Berghof than anywhere else during World War II. It was also one of the most widely known of his headquarters,[1] which were located throughout Europe. Rebuilt, much expanded and renamed in 1935, the Berghof was Hitler's vacation residence for ten years. In late April 1945 the house was damaged by British aerial bombs, set on fire by retreating SS troops in early May, and looted after Allied troops reached the area
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Armenian Quote
The Obersalzberg Speech is a speech given by Adolf Hitler to Wehrmacht commanders at his Obersalzberg home on 22 August 1939, a week before the German invasion of Poland.[1] The speech details, in particular, the pending German invasion of Poland and a planned extermination of Poles. It shows Hitler's knowledge of the extermination and his intention to carry out this genocide in a planned manner.Contents1 Origin of the document 2 German and English wording 3 The Armenian quote 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksOrigin of the document[edit] Three documents were grouped together during Nuremberg Trials which contained Hitler's speech on 22 August 1939 (1014-PS,[2] 798-PS,[3] and L-3,[4][5]) and only the document L-3 contained the Armenian quote.[6] Documents 1014-PS[4] and 798-PS were captured by the United States forces inside the OKW headquarters[7] but these documents did not contain the Armenian quote
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