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Generaladmiral
General admiral
General admiral
was a Danish, Dutch, German, Russian, Portuguese, Spanish and Swedish naval rank. Its historic origin is a title high military or naval dignitaries of early modern Europe sometimes held, for example the (nominal) commander-in-chief of the Dutch Republic's navy (usually the Prince of Orange).Contents1 Nazi Germany 2 Russian Empire 3 Kingdom of Spain 4 Kingdom of Portugal 5 Kingdom of Sweden 6 In fiction 7 ReferencesNazi Germany[edit] Main article: Uniforms and insignia of the Kriegsmarine § Commissioned Officer ranks World War II
World War II
Kriegsmarineshoulder strapsleeve laceCommand flagGeneraladmiralIn the German Kriegsmarine
Kriegsmarine
of the Second World War, Generaladmiral was a rank senior to an Admiral, but junior to a Großadmiral. Generaladmiral was a four-star admiral rank, equivalent to a full admiral in the British and American navies
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Maurice, Prince Of Orange
Maurice of Orange (Dutch: Maurits van Oranje) (14 November 1567 – 23 April 1625) was stadtholder of all the provinces of the Dutch Republic
Dutch Republic
except for Friesland
Friesland
from 1585 at earliest until his death in 1625. Before he became Prince of Orange
Prince of Orange
upon the death of his eldest half-brother Philip William in 1618, he was known as Maurice of Nassau. Maurice spent his youth in Dillenburg
Dillenburg
in Nassau, and studied in Heidelberg
Heidelberg
and Leiden. He succeeded his father William the Silent
William the Silent
as stadtholder of Holland
Holland
and Zeeland
Zeeland
in 1585, and became stadtholder of Utrecht, Guelders
Guelders
and Overijssel
Overijssel
in 1590, and of Groningen in 1620
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Knyaz
Knyaz
Knyaz
or knez is a historical Slavic title, used both as a royal and noble title in different times of history and different ancient Slavic lands. It is usually translated into English as prince, duke or count, depending on specific historical context and the potentially known Latin
Latin
equivalents of the title for each bearer of the name. In Latin, sources the title is usually translated as comes or princeps, but the word was originally derived from the Proto-Germanic
Proto-Germanic
kuningaz (king).[1] The female form transliterated from Bulgarian and Russian is knyaginya (княгиня), kniahynia (княгиня) in Ukrainian, kneginja in Slovene, Croatian and Serbian (Serbian Cyrillic: кнегиња). In Russian, the daughter of a knyaz is knyazhna (княжна), in Ukrainian is kniazivna (князівна)
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Shoulder Board
A shoulder mark, also called an epaulette, shoulder board, rank slide, or slip-on ,[1] is a flat cloth sleeve worn on the shoulder strap of a uniform. It may bear rank or other insignia.Contents1 Australia 2 Canada 3 United States3.1 Military 3.2 Boy Scouts of America4 United Kingdom4.1 Royal Navy 4.2 Army 4.3 Royal Air Force 4.4 St. John Ambulance 4.5 Police5 References 6 Notes 7 External linksAustralia[edit] The newer Auscam
Auscam
uniform design lacks shoulder marks, instead opting for a vertical strap in the middle of the chest region of the uniform. Rank insignia tags are slipped onto this strap. Unlike the older uniform designs, there are slip-ons for every rank in the Australian Defence Force.[citation needed] The older Auscam
Auscam
uniform designs featured shoulder straps, upon which slip-on rank insignia of Commissioned Officers could be affixed, and non-commissioned officers in the Air Force and Navy only
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Russian Language
Russian (Russian: ру́сский язы́к, tr. rússkiy yazýk) is an East Slavic language
East Slavic language
and an official language in Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
and many minor or unrecognised territories throughout Eurasia
Eurasia
(particularly in Eastern Europe, the Baltics, the Caucasus, and Central Asia). It is an unofficial but widely spoken language in Latvia, Moldova, Ukraine
Ukraine
and to a lesser extent, the other post-Soviet states.[31][32] Russian belongs to the family of Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
and is one of the four living members of the East Slavic languages
Slavic languages
(which in turn is part of the larger Balto-Slavic branch)
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Imperial Russian Navy
Imperial Russia Imperial Navy (1696–1917) White movement
White movement
fleet (1917—1922) Soviet Union Soviet Navy
Soviet Navy
(1918–1991) Russian Federation Russian Navy
Russian Navy
(1991–present[update])The Imperial Russian Navy
Russian Navy
(Russian: Российский императорский флот) was the navy of the Russian Empire. It was formally established in 1696 and lasted until being disrupted during the February Revolution
February Revolution
of 1917. It developed from a smaller force that had existed prior to Czar Peter the Great's founding the regular Russian Navy
Russian Navy
during the Second Azov
Azov
campaign
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Romanov
The House of Romanov
House of Romanov
(/ˈroʊməˌnɔːf, -ˌnɒf, roʊˈmɑːnəf/;[1] also Romanoff;[1] Russian: Рома́новы, Románovy, IPA: [rɐˈmanəf]) was the second dynasty to rule Russia, after the House of Rurik, reigning from 1613 until the abdication of Tsar
Tsar
Nicholas II
Nicholas II
on March 15, 1917, as a result of the February Revolution. The Romanovs achieved prominence as boyars of the Grand Duchy of Moscow, later the Tsardom of Russia. In 1613, following years of interregnum (Time of Troubles), the zemsky sobor offered the Russian crown to Mikhail Romanov. He acceded to the throne as Michael I, becoming the first Tsar of Russia
Tsar of Russia
from the House of Romanov
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Count
Count
Count
(male) or countess (female) is a title in European countries for a noble of varying status, but historically deemed to convey an approximate rank intermediate between the highest and lowest titles of nobility.[1] The word count came into English from the French comte, itself from Latin
Latin
comes—in its accusative comitem—meaning “companion”, and later “companion of the emperor, delegate of the emperor”. The adjective form of the word is "comital". The British and Irish equivalent is an earl (whose wife is a "countess", for lack of an English term)
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Franz Lefort
Franz Jakob Lefort (Russian: Франц Яковлевич Лефорт; December 23, 1655 – March 2(12), 1699) was a Russian military figure of Genevan Huguenot
Huguenot
origin, general admiral (1695), and close associate of Tsar Peter the Great. Franz Lefort, born in Geneva, came from a merchant family. He began his military career in the French and Dutch armies. In 1675 Lefort arrived in Russia
Russia
in the company of the Prussian Colonel
Colonel
Jacob van Frosten[1] in order to find employment with the Russian army. In February 1676 he came to Moscow, but military officials turned him down. The Posolsky Prikaz
Posolsky Prikaz
listed him as a visiting foreigner. Lefort settled in the so-called Nemetskaya sloboda
Nemetskaya sloboda
in Moscow, where he would gain respect among other distinguished foreigners
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Fyodor Alexeyevich Golovin
Count
Count
Feodor Alekseyevich Golovin (Фёдор Алексеевич Головин; 1650 – 10 Aug [O.S. 30 July] 1706) was the last Russian boyar and the first Chancellor of the Russian Empire, field marshal, general admiral (1700). Until his death he was the most influential of Peter the Great's associates. Golovin stemmed from the family of Russian treasurers of Byzantine Greek descent. During the regency of Sophia Alekseyevna, sister of Peter the Great, he was sent to the Amur to defend the new fortress of Albazin
Albazin
against the Chinese Qing Empire. In 1689, he concluded with the Qing Empire the Treaty of Nerchinsk, by which the line of the Amur, as far as its tributary the Gorbitsa, was retroceded to China because of the impossibility of seriously defending it. In Peter's Grand Embassy
Grand Embassy
to the West in 1697 Golovin occupied the second place immediately after Franz Lefort
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Fyodor Matveyevich Apraksin
Count
Count
Fyodor Matveyevich Apraksin (also Apraxin; Russian: Фёдор Матве́евич Апра́ксин; 27 October 1661  – 10 November 1728, Moscow) was one of the first Russian admirals, governed Estonia
Estonia
and Karelia
Karelia
from 1712 to 1723, was made general admiral (1708), presided over the Russian Admiralty from 1718 and commanded the Baltic Fleet
Baltic Fleet
from 1723.Contents1 Early shipbuilding activities 2 Great Northern War 3 Later years 4 Legacy 5 Notes 6 ReferencesEarly shipbuilding activities[edit] The Apraksin brothers were launched to prominence after the marriage of their sister Marfa to Tsar
Tsar
Feodor III of Russia
Russia
in 1681. Fyodor entered the service of his brother-in-law at the age of 10 as a stolnik. After Feodor's death he served the little tsar Peter in the same capacity
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Andrei Ivanovich Osterman
Count
Count
Andrey Ivanovich Osterman (Russian: Андрей Иванович Остерман) (9 June 1686  – 31 May 1747) was a German-born Russian statesman who came to prominence under Tsar
Tsar
Peter I of Russia
Russia
(Peter the Great) and served until the accession of the Tsesarevna Elizabeth. His foreign policy was based upon the Austrian alliance. General Admiral
General Admiral
(1740; dismissed 1741).Contents1 Early career 2 Diplomacy 3 Vice-chancellor of all Russia 4 Downfall 5 Notes 6 External linksEarly career[edit] Born in Bochum
Bochum
in Westphalia, of middle-class parents, his original name was Heinrich Johann Friedrich Ostermann. Osterman became secretary to Vice-Admiral Cornelis Kruse, who had a standing commission from Peter the Great to pick up promising young men, and soon thereafter entered the tsar's service
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Mikhail Mikhailovich Golitsyn (admiral)
Prince Mikhail Mikhailovitch Golitsyn (Russian: Михаи́л Миха́йлович Голи́цын) (1 November 1684–25 March 1764) was a Russian admiral and diplomat.Contents1 Biography 2 Marriages2.1 First marriage 2.2 Second marriage3 ReferencesBiography[edit] Born in Moscow, he was the youngest son of Mikhail Andreyevich Golitsyn and his wife Prascovia Nikitichna Kaftyriova. In 1703 he began a career in the Imperial Russian Navy. From 1708 to 1717 he studied seamanship in the Netherlands
Netherlands
and the United Kingdom. In 1717 he returned to Russia and participated in the Great Northern War, during which he distinguished himself in the Battle of Grengam, commanding a detachment of rowing fleet that defeated a Swedish squadron.[1] In 1726 he became advisor to the Board of Admiralty and was made a Lieutenant commander. In 1728 he became privy councilor and senator, and in 1727 he was named president of the College of Justice
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Karl Dönitz
Karl Dönitz
Karl Dönitz
(sometimes spelled Doenitz) (German: [ˈkaɐ̯l ˈdøːnɪts] ( listen); 16 September 1891 – 24 December 1980) was a German admiral who played a major role in the naval history of World War II. Dönitz briefly succeeded Adolf Hitler as the head of state of Germany. He began his career in the Imperial German Navy
Imperial German Navy
before World War I. In 1918, while he was in command of UB-68, the submarine was sunk by British forces and Dönitz was taken prisoner. While in a prisoner of war camp, he formulated what he later called Rudeltaktik[2] ("pack tactic", commonly called "wolfpack"). At the start of World War II, he was the senior submarine officer in the Kriegsmarine
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Grand Duke Of Russia
This is a list of those members of the Russian Imperial Family who bore the title Velikiy Knjaz (usually translated into English as Grand Duke, but more accurately Grand Prince). This courtesy title was borne by the sons and male-line grandsons of the Emperors of Russia, along with the style of His Imperial Highness. They were not sovereigns, but members and dynasts of the House of the reigning Emperor. For those Grand Dukes who were rulers of Russia, see List of Russian rulers. The title Grand Prince
Grand Prince
is the English translation of the Russian Великий князь. The Slavic "knyaz" and the Baltic "kunigaitis" (both nowadays usually translated as Prince) is a cognate of King. The title Grand Prince
Grand Prince
originated from 9th century when rulers of Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
were so styled
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Paul I Of Russia
Paul I (Russian: Па́вел I Петро́вич; Pavel Petrovich) (1 October [O.S. 20 September] 1754 – 23 March [O.S. 11 March] 1801) reigned as Emperor
Emperor
of Russia between 1796 and 1801. Officially, he was the only son of Peter III (reigned January to July 1762) (whom he resembled physically and by character) and of Catherine the Great
Catherine the Great
(reigned 1762–96), though Catherine hinted that he was fathered by her lover Sergei Saltykov, who also had Romanov blood, being a descendant of the first Romanov Tsar's sister, Tatiana Feodorovna Romanova.[1] Paul remained overshadowed by his mother for much of his life. His reign lasted five years, ending with his assassination by conspirators
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