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General Graphics Interface
General Graphics Interface (GGI) is a project that aims to develop a reliable, stable and fast computer graphics system that works everywhere. The intent is to allow for any program using GGI to run on any computing platform supported by it, requiring at most a recompilation. GGI is free and open-source software, subject to the requirements of the MIT License.Contents1 Goals 2 History 3 Current status 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksGoals[edit] The project was originally started to make switching back and forth between virtual consoles, svgalib, and the X display server subsystems on Linux
Linux
more reliable. The goals are:Portability through a flexible and extensible API for the applications
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Software Developer
A software developer is a person concerned with facets of the software development process, including the research, design, programming, and testing of computer software. Other job titles which are often used with similar meanings are programmer, software analyst, and software engineer. According to developer Eric Sink, the differences between system design, software development, and programming are more apparent. Already in the current market place there can be found a segregation between programmers and developers, being that one who implements is not the same as the one who designs the class structure or hierarchy. Even more so that developers become software architects or systems architects, those who design the multi-leveled architecture or component interactions of a large software system.[1] In a large company, there may be employees whose sole responsibility consists of only one of the phases above
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*BSD
Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) was a Unix operating system derivative developed and distributed by the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG) of the University of California, Berkeley, from 1977 to 1995. Today, the term "BSD" is often used non-specifically to refer to any of the BSD descendants which form a branch of the family of Unix-like operating systems. Operating systems derived from the original Berkeley source code, such as FreeBSD and OpenBSD, remain actively developed and widely used. BSD was initially called Berkeley Unix because it shared the same source code with AT&T Research Unix
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Scanner Access Now Easy
Scanner Access Now Easy
Scanner Access Now Easy
(SANE) is an application programming interface (API) that provides standardized access to any raster image scanner hardware (flatbed scanner, handheld scanner, video- and still-cameras, frame grabbers, etc.). The SANE API is public domain and its discussion and development is open to everybody. It is commonly used on Linux.Contents1 Development 2 Graphical user interfaces2.1 XSane 2.2 Simple Scan 2.3 gscan2pdf 2.4 SwingSane3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDevelopment[edit] SANE differs from TWAIN
TWAIN
in that it is cleanly separated into frontends (user programs) and backends (scanner drivers). Whereas a TWAIN
TWAIN
driver handles the user interface as well as communications with the scanner hardware, a SANE driver only provides an interface with the hardware and describes a number of "options" which drive each scan
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Linus Torvalds
Linus Benedict Torvalds (/ˈliːnəs ˈtɔːrvɔːldz/;[5] Swedish: [ˈliːn.ɵs ˈtuːr.valds] ( listen); born December 28, 1969) is a Finnish-American
Finnish-American
software engineer[2][6] who is the creator, and for a long time, principal developer of the Linux kernel, which became the kernel for operating systems such as the Linux
Linux
operating systems, Android, and Chrome OS. He also created the distributed revision control system Git
Git
and the diving logging and planning software Subsurface
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Multiseat Configuration
A multiseat, multi-station or multiterminal configuration is a single computer which supports multiple independent local users at the same time. A "seat" consists of all hardware devices assigned to a specific workplace at which one user sits at and interacts with the computer. It consists of at least one graphics device (graphics card or just an output (e.g. HDMI/VGA/ DisplayPort
DisplayPort
port) and the attached monitor/beamer) for the output and a keyboard and a mouse for the input
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Terminfo
Terminfo is a library and database that enables programs to use display terminals in a device-independent manner
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GNU Hurd
GNU
GNU
Hurd is the multiserver microkernel written as part of GNU. It has been under development since 1990 by the GNU Project
GNU Project
of the Free Software Foundation, designed as a replacement for the Unix
Unix
kernel,[3] and released as free software under the GNU
GNU
General Public License. While the Linux kernel
Linux kernel
soon proved to be a more viable solution, development of GNU
GNU
Hurd continued, albeit at a slow pace.[4] GNU
GNU
Hurd consists of a set of protocols and server processes (or daemons, in Unix
Unix
terminology) that run on the GNU
GNU
Mach microkernel.[3] The Hurd aims to surpass the Unix
Unix
kernel in functionality, security, and stability, while remaining largely compatible with it
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System V
UNIX System V
UNIX System V
(pronounced: "System Five") is one of the first commercial versions of the Unix
Unix
operating system. It was originally developed by AT&T and first released in 1983. Four major versions of System V were released, numbered 1, 2, 3, and 4. System V Release 4, or SVR4, was commercially the most successful version, being the result of an effort, marketed as " Unix
Unix
System Unification", which solicited the collaboration of the major Unix
Unix
vendors. It was the source of several common commercial Unix
Unix
features
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Quartz (graphics Layer)
In Apple computer's macOS operating system, Quartz is the Quartz 2D and Quartz Compositor
Quartz Compositor
part of the Core Graphics framework. Quartz includes both a 2D renderer in Core Graphics and the composition engine that sends instructions to the graphics card
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Mac OS X
macOS (/ˌmækoʊˈɛs/;[5] previously Mac OS X, then OS X) is a series of graphical operating systems developed and marketed by Apple Inc. since 2001. It is the primary operating system for Apple's Mac family of computers. Within the market of desktop, laptop and home computers, and by web usage, it is the second most widely used desktop OS, after Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows.[6][7] macOS is the second major series of Macintosh
Macintosh
operating systems. The first is colloquially called the "classic" Mac OS, which was introduced in 1984, and the final release of which was Mac OS 9
Mac OS 9
in 1999. The first desktop version, Mac OS X
Mac OS X
10.0, was released in March 2001, with its first update, 10.1, arriving later that year. After this, Apple began naming its releases after big cats, which lasted until OS X
OS X
10.8 Mountain Lion
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MS Windows
Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows is a group of several graphical operating system families, all of which are developed, marketed, and sold by Microsoft. Each family caters to a certain sector of the computing industry. Active Windows families include Windows NT
Windows NT
and Windows Embedded; these may encompass subfamilies, e.g. Windows Embedded
Windows Embedded
Compact (Windows CE) or Windows Server
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NetBSD
NetBSD
NetBSD
is a free and open source Unix-like
Unix-like
operating system that descends from Berkeley Software Distribution
Berkeley Software Distribution
(BSD), a Research Unix derivative developed at the University of California, Berkeley. It was the first open-source BSD descendant formally released after it was forked from 386BSD[2][3]. It continues to be actively developed and is available for many platforms, including large-scale server systems, desktop systems, and handheld devices,[3] and is often used in embedded systems.[4][5] The NetBSD
NetBSD
project focuses on code clarity, careful design, and portability across many computer architectures
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VNC
In computing, Virtual Network Computing
Virtual Network Computing
(VNC) is a graphical desktop sharing system that uses the Remote Frame Buffer protocol (RFB) to remotely control another computer. It transmits the keyboard and mouse events from one computer to another, relaying the graphical screen updates back in the other direction, over a network.[1] VNC is platform-independent – there are clients and servers for many GUI-based operating systems and for Java. Multiple clients may connect to a VNC server at the same time. Popular uses for this technology include remote technical support and accessing files on one's work computer from one's home computer, or vice versa. VNC was originally developed at the Olivetti
Olivetti
& Oracle Research Lab in Cambridge, United Kingdom
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Direct Rendering Infrastructure
The Direct Rendering Infrastructure
Direct Rendering Infrastructure
(DRI) is a framework for allowing direct access to graphics hardware under the X Window System
X Window System
in a safe, efficient way.[6] The main use of DRI is to provide hardware acceleration for the Mesa implementation of OpenGL
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