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Gen'ō
Gen'ō
Gen'ō
(元応) was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, "year name") after Bunpō
Bunpō
and before Genkō. This period spanned the years from April 1319 through February 1321.[1] The reigning Emperor was Go-Daigo-tennō (後醍醐天皇).[2]Contents1 Change of era 2 Events of the Gen'ō
Gen'ō
era 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksChange of era[edit]1319 Gen'ō
Gen'ō
gannen (元応元年): The new era name was created to mark the accession of Emperor Go-Daigo
Emperor Go-Daigo
and the beginning of his reign. The previous era ended and the new one commenced in Bunpō
Bunpō
3.Events of the Gen'ō
Gen'ō
era[edit] After the abdication of Emperor Hanazono in Bunpō
Bunpō
2, Takaharu-shinno was proclaimed emperor at the age of 31
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History Of Japan
The first human habitation in the Japanese archipelago
Japanese archipelago
has been traced to prehistoric times. The Jōmon period, named after its "cord-marked" pottery, was followed by the Yayoi
Yayoi
in the first millennium BC, when new technologies were introduced from continental Asia. During this period, the first known written reference to Japan
Japan
was recorded in the Chinese Book of Han
Book of Han
in the first century AD. Between the fourth century and the ninth century, Japan's many kingdoms and tribes gradually came to be unified under a centralized government, nominally controlled by the Emperor. This imperial dynasty continues to reign over Japan. In 794, a new imperial capital was established at Heian-kyō
Heian-kyō
(modern Kyoto), marking the beginning of the Heian period, which lasted until 1185
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Lost Decade (Japan)
The Lost Decade or the Lost 10 Years (失われた十年, Ushinawareta Jūnen) is a period of economic stagnation in Japan
Japan
following the Japanese asset price bubble's collapse in late 1991 and early 1992. The term originally referred to the years from 1991 to 2000,[1] but recently the decade from 2001 to 2010 is often included,[2] so that the whole period is referred to as the Lost Score or the Lost 20 Years (失われた二十年, Ushinawareta Nijūnen). Broadly impacting the entire Japanese economy, over the period of 1995 to 2007, GDP
GDP
fell from $5.33 to $4.36 trillion in nominal terms,[3] real wages fell around 5%,[4] while the country experienced a stagnant price level.[5] While there is some debate on the extent and measurement of Japan's setbacks,[6][7] the economic effect of the Lost Decade is well established and Japanese policymakers continue to grapple with its consequences
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Shōwa Period
The Shōwa period
Shōwa period
(Japanese: 昭和時代,, Hepburn: Shōwa jidai, potentially "period of enlightened peace/harmony" or "period of radiant Japan"), or Shōwa era, refers to the period of Japanese history corresponding to the reign of the Shōwa Emperor, Hirohito, from December 25, 1926 until his death on January 7, 1989.[1] The Shōwa period
Shōwa period
was longer than the reign of any previous Japanese emperor. During the pre-1945 period, Japan
Japan
moved into political totalitarianism, ultranationalism and fascism culminating in Japan's invasion of China
China
in 1937
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Shōwa Financial Crisis
The Shōwa Financial Crisis (昭和金融恐慌, Shōwa Kin'yū Kyōkō) was a financial panic in 1927, during the first year of the reign of Emperor Hirohito
Hirohito
of Japan, and was a foretaste of the Great Depression. It brought down the government of Prime Minister Wakatsuki Reijirō and led to the domination of the zaibatsu over the Japanese banking industry. The Shōwa Financial Crisis occurred after the post–World War I business boom in Japan. Many companies invested heavily in increased production capacity in what proved to be an economic bubble. The post-1920 economic slowdown and the Great Kantō earthquake
Great Kantō earthquake
of 1923 caused an economic depression, which led to the failures of many businesses. The government intervened through the Bank
Bank
of Japan by issuing discounted "earthquake bonds" to overextended banks
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Japanese Militarism
Japanese militarism
Japanese militarism
(日本軍國主義 or 日本軍国主義, Nihon gunkoku shugi) refers to the ideology in the Empire of Japan
Empire of Japan
that militarism should dominate the political and social life of the nation, and that the strength of the military is equal to the strength of a nation.Contents1 History1.1 Rise of militarism 1.2 Economic factors 1.3 Independence of the military 1.4 Growth of ultranationalism 1.5 Growth of military adventurism 1.6 Opposition to militarism 1.7 Japan attacking Pearl Harbor 1.8 Post-war2 Timeline 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Rise of militarism[edit] The military had a strong influence on Japanese society from the Meiji Restoration
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Occupation Of Japan
A job, or occupation, is a person's role in society. More specifically, a job is an activity, often regular and often performed in exchange for payment ("for a living"). Many people have multiple jobs (e.g., parent, homemaker, and employee). A person can begin a job by becoming an employee, volunteering, starting a business, or becoming a parent. The duration of a job may range from temporary (e.g., hourly odd jobs) to a lifetime (e.g., judges). An activity that requires a person's mental or physical effort is work (as in "a day's work"). If a person is trained for a certain type of job, they may have a profession. Typically, a job would be a subset of someone's career
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Japanese Economic Miracle
The Japanese economic miracle
Japanese economic miracle
was Japan's record period of economic growth between the post- World War II
World War II
era to the end of Cold War. During the economic boom, Japan
Japan
rapidly became the world's second largest economy (after the United States)
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Post-occupation Japan
Post-occupation Japan
Japan
is the period in Japanese history which started after the Allied occupation of Japan
Japan
and ended in 1952. Japan
Japan
has established itself as a global economic and political power.Contents1 Politics 2 Economy 3 Foreign relations 4 Culture 5 Timeline to 1989 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksPolitics[edit] The Allied occupation ended on April 28, 1952, when the terms of the Treaty of San Francisco
Treaty of San Francisco
went into effect. By the terms of the treaty, Japan
Japan
regained its sovereignty, but lost many of its possessions from before World War II, including Korea, Taiwan
Taiwan
and Sakhalin. It also lost control over a number of small islands in the Pacific which it administered as League of Nations Mandates, such as the Marianas
Marianas
and the Marshalls
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Japanese Asset Price Bubble
The Japanese asset price bubble
Japanese asset price bubble
(バブル景気, baburu keiki, "bubble condition") was an economic bubble in Japan
Japan
from 1986 to 1991 in which real estate and stock market prices were greatly inflated.[1] In early 1992, this price bubble collapsed. The bubble was characterized by rapid acceleration of asset prices and overheated economic activity, as well as an uncontrolled money supply and credit expansion.[2] More specifically, over-confidence and speculation regarding asset and stock prices had been closely associated with excessive monetary easing policy at the time.[3] By August 1990, the Nikkei stock index had plummeted to half its peak by the time of the fifth monetary tightening by the Bank of Japan (BOJ).[2] By late 1991, asset prices began to fall. Even though asset prices had visibly collapsed by early 1992,[2] the economy's decline continued for more than a decade
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Heisei Period
The Heisei period
Heisei period
(Japanese: 平成時代, Hepburn: Heisei jidai) is the current era in Japan. The Heisei period
Heisei period
started on 8 January 1989, the day after the death of the Emperor Hirohito. His son, the 125th Emperor Akihito, acceded to the throne. In accordance with Japanese customs, Hirohito
Hirohito
was posthumously renamed the 124th "Emperor Shōwa" on 31 January 1989. Thus, 1989 corresponds to Shōwa 64 until 7 January, and Heisei 1 (平成元年, Heisei gannen, gannen means "first year") since 8 January
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Japanese Currency
Japanese currency
Japanese currency
has a history covering the period from the 8th century to the present
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Taishō Period
The Taishō period
Taishō period
(大正時代, Taishō jidai), or Taishō era, is a period in the history of Japan
Japan
dating from July 30, 1912, to December 25, 1926, coinciding with the reign of the Emperor Taishō.[1] The new emperor was a sickly man, which prompted the shift in political power from the old oligarchic group of elder statesmen (or genrō) to the Imperial Diet of Japan
Japan
and the democratic parties
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List Of Earthquakes In Japan
This is a list of earthquakes in Japan
Japan
with either a magnitude greater than or equal to 7.0 or which caused significant damage or casualties. As indicated below, magnitude is measured on the Richter magnitude scale (ML) or the moment magnitude scale (Mw), or the surface wave magnitude scale (Ms) for very old earthquakes
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Economic History Of Japan
The economic history of Japan is most studied for the spectacular social and economic growth in the 1800s after the Meiji Restoration, when it became the first non-European great power, and for its expansion after the Second World War, when Japan recovered from devastation to become the world's second largest economy behind the United States, and from 2013 behind China as well
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