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Geis
In Irish, a geas (alternatives: geis, géis, deas; plural geasa) is an idiosyncratic taboo, whether of obligation or prohibition, similar to being under a vow. The plural is also used to mean specifically a spell prohibiting some action, common in Irish folklore and mythology. It is this additional meaning of the plural which the article discusses. The equivalent Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
word, also used in English, is "geas" ([ˈkes], plural "geasan").[1]Contents1 In Irish mythology 2 Welsh mythology 3 Parallels in English literature 4 See also 5 ReferencesIn Irish mythology[edit] A geas can be compared with a curse or, paradoxically, a gift. If someone under a geas violates the associated taboo, the infractor will suffer dishonor or even death. On the other hand, the observing of one's geas is believed to bring power. Often it is women who place geasa upon men
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Belenus
Belenus
Belenus
(also Belenos, Belinus, Bel, Beli Mawr) is a sun god from Celtic Mythology
Celtic Mythology
and, in the third century, the patron deity of the Italian city of Aquileia. Called the "Fair Shining One" (or "The Shining God"), he was one of the most ancient and most-widely worshiped Celtic deities and is associated with the ancient fire festival and modern Sabbat
Sabbat
Beltane.[1] He was associated with the horse (as shown by the clay horse figurine offerings at Belenos' Sainte-Sabine
Sainte-Sabine
shrine in Burgundy) and also the wheel
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Abandinus
Abandinus
Abandinus
was a name used to refer to a Celtic god or male spirit worshipped in Godmanchester
Godmanchester
in Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
during the Romano-Celtic period. Epigraphic evidence[edit] Abandinus
Abandinus
is represented in Britain on a single altarstone
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Terry Pratchett
Sir
Sir
Terence David John Pratchett OBE (28 April 1948 – 12 March 2015), better known as Terry Pratchett, was an English author of fantasy novels, especially comical works.[2] He is best known for his Discworld
Discworld
series of 41 novels. Pratchett's first novel, The Carpet People, was published in 1971. The first Discworld
Discworld
novel, The Colour of Magic, was published in 1983, after which he wrote two books a year on average
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Arduinna
In Gallo-Roman religion, Arduinna
Arduinna
(also Arduina, Arduinnae or Arduinne) was the eponymous tutelary goddess of the Ardennes
Ardennes
Forest and region, thought to be represented as a huntress riding a boar (primarily in the present-day regions of Belgium
Belgium
and Luxembourg). Her cult originated in the Ardennes
Ardennes
region of present-day Belgium, Luxembourg, and France
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Barbarian
A barbarian is a human who is perceived to be either uncivilized or primitive. The designation is usually applied as generalization based on a popular stereotype; barbarians can be any member of a nation judged by some to be less civilized or orderly (such as a tribal society), but may also be part of a certain "primitive" cultural group (such as nomads) or social class (such as bandits) both within and outside one's own nation. Alternatively, they may instead be admired and romanticised as noble savages
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Tolkien's Legendarium
Tolkien's legendarium is the body of J. R. R
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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Beira (mythology)
Beira is the name given by 20th-century folklorist Donald Alexander Mackenzie to the Cailleach
Cailleach
Bheur, the personification of winter and the mother of all the gods and goddesses in Scottish mythology.[1] She is associated with one of the Celtic creation myths (which usually pertain to local land features) and bears a similar role to Gaea in Greek mythology
Greek mythology
and Jord
Jord
in Norse mythology. According to Mackenzie, Beira was a one-eyed giantess with white hair, dark blue skin, and rust-colored teeth. She built the mountains of Scotland using a magic hammer, and Loch Ness
Loch Ness
was created when Beira transformed her negligent maid Nessa into a river, which broke loose and made the loch. Ben Nevis
Ben Nevis
was her "mountain throne"
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Cailleach
In Gaelic mythology (Irish, Scottish and Manx) the Cailleach
Cailleach
(Irish pronunciation: [ki'lʲax /ˈkalʲəx], Scottish Gaelic pronunciation: [ˈkaʎəx]) is a divine hag, a creator deity and weather deity, and an ancestor deity. She is also commonly known as the Cailleach
Cailleach
Bhéara(ch) or Bheur(ach). In Scotland
Scotland
she is also known as Beira, Queen of Winter
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Abellio
Abellio
Abellio
(also Abelio and Abelionni) was a god worshipped in the Garonne
Garonne
Valley in Gallia Aquitania
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Macbeth
Macbeth
Macbeth
(/məkˈbɛθ/; full title The Tragedy of Macbeth) is a tragedy by William Shakespeare; it is thought to have been first performed in 1606.[a] It dramatises the damaging physical and psychological effects of political ambition on those who seek power for its own sake. Of all the plays that Shakespeare
Shakespeare
wrote during the reign of James I, who was patron of Shakespeare's acting company, Macbeth
Macbeth
most clearly reflects the playwright's relationship with his sovereign.[1] It was first published in the Folio of 1623, possibly from a prompt book, and is Shakespeare's shortest tragedy.[2] A brave Scottish general named Macbeth
Macbeth
receives a prophecy from a trio of witches that one day he will become King of Scotland
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Abnoba
Abnoba
Abnoba
is a name with theological and geographical meanings: It is the name of a Gaulish goddess who was worshiped in the Black Forest
Black Forest
and surrounding areas. It is also the name of a mountain or mountain range.Contents1 Etymology 2 Celtic polytheism 3 Geography 4 Bibliography 5 Further reading 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The etymology of the theonym is uncertain. It has been associated[by whom?] with the etymon *abo-s "water, river", found in e.g. Avon (*abonā). The second element has been connected[by whom?] to either a PIE
PIE
*nogʷo-, either "naked, nude" or "tree",[clarification needed] or[by whom?] with the verbal root *nebh- "burst out, be damp". Celtic polytheism[edit] Abnoba
Abnoba
has been interpreted to be a forest and river goddess, and is known from about nine epigraphic inscriptions
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Adsullata
In Celtic mythology, Adsullata was a river goddess of the Continental Celts
Celts
associated with the River Savus (Sava) in Noricum.[1] This deity is known from a single inscription found at Saudörfel, Austria. Later she came to Brittany
Brittany
from Celtic Gaul
Gaul
and was believed to be a goddess of hot springs and the origin of the Anglo-Celtic sun goddess, Sul. Etymology[edit] This theonym appears to be derived from Proto-Celtic *Ad-sūg-lat-ā. That derivation literally means (allative) "sucking liquid", which may have been a byword for the notion of "suck-giving liquid"[2] The Romano-British
Romano-British
form of this Proto-Celtic reconstruction would likely have been *Adsuglata.[3] References[edit]^ Patricia Turner and Charles Russel Coulter. Dictionary of ancient deities. Oxford University Press, 2000.  ^ Cf
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Agrona
*Agronā was a hypothetical reconstructed Proto-Celtic name for the river Ayr in Scotland, later applied to the river Aeron in Wales. The claim was linguistic and first appeared in William J. Watson’s Celtic Placenames of Scotland (1926).[1] Watson suggested the river Ayr in Scotland could be worked back to a hypothetical Proto-Celtic 'river goddess of slaughter and carnage', and that the deity name was *Agronā.[2] At that time there were many questionable Scottish nationalist attempts to use the River Ayr
River Ayr
place-name to claim Taliesin’s battle poems for Scotland, and Watson’s derivation strongly and implicitly supported such claims. Two years later Eilert Ekwall in his English River-Names (Oxford University Press, 1928, reprinted 1968) instead derived the river Ayr simply from the root *Ara. However the earlier claim that the river's name literally means 'carnage' persisted
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