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GDP
Gross domestic product
Gross domestic product
(GDP) is a monetary measure of the market value of all final goods and services produced in a period (quarterly or yearly) of time. Nominal GDP estimates are commonly used to determine the economic performance of a whole country or region, and to make international comparisons
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Computational Economics
Computational economics
Computational economics
is a research discipline at the interface of computer science, economics, and management science.[1] This subject encompasses computational modeling of economic systems, whether agent-based,[2] general-equilibrium,[3] macroeconomic,[4] or rational-expectations,[5] computational econometrics and statistics,[6] computational finance, computational tools for the design of automated internet markets, programming tools specifically designed for computational economics, and pedagogical tools for the teaching of computational economics
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Schools Of Economic Thought
In the history of economic thought, a school of economic thought is a group of economic thinkers who share or shared a common perspective on the way economies work. While economists do not always fit into particular schools, particularly in modern times, classifying economists into schools of thought is common. Economic thought may be roughly divided into three phases: premodern (Greco-Roman, Indian, Persian, Islamic, and Imperial Chinese), early modern (mercantilist, physiocrats) and modern (beginning with Adam Smith
Adam Smith
and classical economics in the late 18th century). Systematic economic theory has been developed mainly since the beginning of what is termed the modern era. Currently, the great majority of economists follow an approach referred to as mainstream economics (sometimes called 'orthodox economics')
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Bretton Woods Conference
The Bretton Woods Conference, formally known as the United Nations Monetary and Financial Conference, was the gathering of 730 delegates from all 44 Allied nations at the Mount Washington Hotel, situated in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, United States, to regulate the international monetary and financial order after the conclusion of World War II.[1] The conference was held from July 1–22, 1944
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Game Theory
Game theory
Game theory
is "the study of mathematical models of conflict and cooperation between intelligent rational decision-makers". Game theory is mainly used in economics, political science, and psychology, as well as in logic and computer science.[1] Originally, it addressed zero-sum games, in which one person's gains result in losses for the other participants. Today, game theory applies to a wide range of behavioral relations, and is now an umbrella term for the science of logical decision making in humans, animals, and computers. Modern game theory began with the idea regarding the existence of mixed-strategy equilibria in two-person zero-sum games and its proof by John von Neumann. Von Neumann's original proof used the Brouwer fixed-point theorem on continuous mappings into compact convex sets, which became a standard method in game theory and mathematical economics
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US Department Of Commerce
The United States Department of Commerce
United States Department of Commerce
is the Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with promoting economic growth. Among its tasks are gathering economic and demographic data for business and government decision-making, and helping to set industrial standards. This organization's main purpose is to create jobs, promote economic growth, encourage sustainable development and improve standards of living for all Americans.[3] The Department of Commerce headquarters is the Herbert C. Hoover Building
Herbert C

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Demand
In economics, demand is the quantity of a commodity or a service that people are willing or able to buy at a certain price, per unit of time.[1] The relationship between price and quantity demanded is also known as demand curve. Preferences and choices, which underlie demand, can be represented as functions of cost, benefit, odds and other variables. Determinants of (Factors affecting) demand Innumerable factors and circumstances could affect a buyer's willingness or ability to buy a good. Some of the common factors are:Good's own price: The basic demand relationship is between potential prices of a good and the quantities that would be purchased at those prices. Generally the relationship is negative meaning that an increase in price will induce a decrease in the quantity demanded. This negative relationship is embodied in the downward slope of the consumer demand curve. The assumption of a negative relationship is reasonable and intuitive
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Index Of Economics Articles
This aims to be a complete article list of economics topics:EconomicsA supply and demand diagram, illustrating the effects of an increase in demandIndex Outline CategoryHistory Types ClassificationHistory of economics Economic history
Economic history
(academic study) Schools of economicsMicroeconomics Macroeconomics Methodology Heterodox economics JEL classification codesConcepts Theory TechniquesEconometrics Economic growth Economic system Experimental economics Mathematical economics Game theory Post-scarcity Market National accountingBy appli
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Outline Of Economics
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to economics: Economics
Economics
– analyzes the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services
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Microeconomics
Microeconomics
Microeconomics
(from Greek prefix mikro- meaning "small") is a branch of economics that studies the behavior of individuals and firms in making decisions regarding the allocation of scarce resources and the interactions among these individuals and firms.[1][2][3] One goal of microeconomics is to analyze the market mechanisms that establish relative prices among goods and services and allocate limited resources among alternative uses. Microeconomics
Microeconomics
shows conditions under which free markets lead to desirable allocations
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Simon Kuznets
Simon Smith Kuznets (/kʊzˈnɛts, ˈkʌznɛts/; Russian: Семён Абра́мович Кузне́ц, IPA: [sʲɪˈmʲɵn ɐˈbraməvʲɪtɕ kʊzʲˈnʲɛts]; April 30, 1901 – July 8, 1985) was a Russo-American economist and statistician who received the 1971 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences "for his empirically founded interpretation of economic growth which has led to new and deepened insight into the economic and social structure and process of development." Kuznets made a decisive contribution to the transformation of economics into an empirical science and to the formation of quantitative economic history.[2]Contents1 Biography1.1 Early Life 1.2 Emigration to the United States2 Impact on Economics2.1 Historical series of economic dynamics and Kuznets Cycles, or "long swings" 2.2 National income accounts 2.3 Economic growth3 Kuznets curve3.1 Historical and economic works of the 1970s4 Selected publications
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Economic Methodology
Economic methodology
Economic methodology
is the study of methods, especially the scientific method, in relation to economics, including principles underlying economic reasoning.[1] In contemporary English, 'methodology' may reference theoretical or systematic aspects of a method (or several methods). Philosophy and economics
Philosophy and economics
also takes up methodology at the intersection of the two subjects.Contents1 Scope 2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksScope[edit]This section is in a list format that may be better presented using prose. You can help by converting this section to prose, if appropriate. Editing help is available
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Heterodox Economics
Heterodox economics
Heterodox economics
refers to schools of economic thought or methodologies that are outside "mainstream economics", often represented by expositors as contrasting with or going beyond neoclassical economics.[1][2] "Heterodox economics" is an umbrella term used to cover various approaches, schools, or traditions
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JEL Classification Codes
Articles in economics journals are usually classified according to the JEL classification codes, a system originated by the Journal of Economic Literature. The JEL is published quarterly by the American Economic Association (AEA) and contains survey articles and information on recently published books and dissertations. The AEA maintains EconLit, a searchable data base of citations for articles, books, reviews, dissertations, and working papers classified by JEL codes for the years from 1969. A recent addition to EconLit is indexing of economics-journal articles from 1886 to 1968[1] parallel to the print series Index of Economic Articles.[2]Contents1 Structure 2 Purpose 3 JEL categories3.1 A. General Economics
Economics
and Teaching 3.2 B. History of Economic Thought, Methodology, and Heterodox Approaches 3.3 C. Mathematical and Quantitative Methods 3.4 D. Microeconomics 3.5 E
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Post-scarcity Economy
Post-scarcity is an economic theory in which most goods can be produced in great abundance with minimal human labor needed, so that they become available to all very cheaply or even freely.[1][2] Post-scarcity is not generally taken to mean that scarcity has been eliminated for all consumer goods and services; instead, it is often taken to mean that all people can easily have their basic survival needs met along with some significant proportion of their desires for goods and services,[3] with writers on the topic often emphasizing that certain commodities are likely to remain scarce in a post-scarcity society.[4][5][6][7] In the paper "The Post- Scarcity
Scarcity
World of 2050-2075",[8] authors assert that we are currently living an age of scarcity resulting from negligent behavior (as regards the future) of the 19th and 20th centuries
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Economic System
An economic system is a system of production, resource allocation, and distribution of goods and services within a society or a given geographic area. It includes the combination of the various institutions, agencies, entities, decision-making processes, and patterns of consumption that comprise the economic structure of a given community. As such, an economic system is a type of social system
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