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Gazette
A GAZETTE is an official journal , a newspaper of record , or simply a newspaper . In English- and French-speaking countries, newspaper publishers have applied the name Gazette since the 17th century; today, numerous weekly and daily newspapers bear the name The Gazette. CONTENTS * 1 Etymology * 2 Government gazettes * 3 Gazette as a verb * 4 See also * 5 References ETYMOLOGY Gazette is a loanword from the French language; in turn, the French word is a 16th-century permutation of the Italian gazzetta, which is the name of a particular Venetian coin. Gazzetta became an epithet for newspaper during the early and middle 16th century, when the first Venetian newspapers cost one gazzetta. (Compare with other vernacularisms from publishing lingo, such as the British penny dreadful and the American dime novel .) This loanword, with its various corruptions , persists in numerous modern languages
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BirdLife International
BIRDLIFE INTERNATIONAL (formerly the INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL FOR BIRD PRESERVATION) is a global partnership of conservation organisations that strives to conserve birds , their habitats and global biodiversity , working with people towards sustainability in the use of natural resources. It is the world's largest partnership of conservation organisations, with over 120 partner organisations. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Regional work * 2.1 Member organisations * 3 Global programmes * 4 Magazine * 5 Red List * 6 See also * 7 References * 8 External links HISTORY BirdLife International
BirdLife International
was founded as in 1922 the International Council for Bird Preservation by American ornithologists T. Gilbert Pearson and Jean Theodore Delacour . It changed its name in 1993 to "BirdLife International"
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Government Of The United Kingdom
HER MAJESTY\'S GOVERNMENT (HMG; Welsh : Llywodraeth Ei Mawrhydi), commonly referred to as the UK GOVERNMENT or BRITISH GOVERNMENT, is the central government of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
. The government is led by the Prime Minister , who selects all the remaining ministers . The prime minister and the other most senior ministers belong to the supreme decision-making committee, known as the Cabinet . The government ministers all sit in Parliament , and are accountable to it
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List Of English Words Of French Origin
A great number of WORDS OF FRENCH ORIGIN have entered the English language to the extent that many Latin
Latin
words have come to the English language. According to different sources , 45% of all English words have a French origin. This suggests that 80,000 words should appear in this list; this list, however, only includes words imported directly from French, such as both joy and joyous, and does not include derivatives formed in English of words borrowed from French, including joyful, joyfulness, partisanship, and parenthood. It also excludes both combinations of words of French origin with words whose origin is a language other than French — e. g.: ice cream, sunray, jellyfish, killjoy, lifeguard, and passageway— and English-made combinations of words of French origin — e. g.: grapefruit (grape + fruit), layperson (lay + person), mailorder, magpie, marketplace, surrender, petticoat, and straitjacket
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Merriam-Webster
MERRIAM–WEBSTER, INCORPORATED, is an American company that publishes reference books, especially known for its dictionaries . In 1828, George and Charles Merriam founded the company as G it sold poorly, with only 2,500 copies putting him in debt. However, in 1840, he published the second edition in two volumes with much greater success. Author and poet Nathan W. Austin explores the intersection of lexicographical and poetic practices in American literature, and attempts to map out a "lexical poetics" using Webster's dictionaries as a base. He shows ways that American poetry inherited Webster's ideas and draws on his lexicography to develop the language
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Irish Free State
The IRISH FREE STATE (Irish : Saorstát Éireann pronounced ; 6 December 1922 – 29 December 1937) was an independent state established in 1922 under the Anglo-Irish Treaty
Anglo-Irish Treaty
of December 1921. That treaty ended the three-year Irish War of Independence between the forces of the self-proclaimed Irish Republic
Irish Republic
, the Irish Republican Army (IRA), and British Crown forces. The Free State was established as a Dominion
Dominion
of the British Commonwealth of Nations
Commonwealth of Nations
. It comprised 26 of the 32 counties of Ireland
Ireland
. Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
, which comprised the remaining six counties, exercised its right under the Treaty to opt out of the new state
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Northern Ireland
NORTHERN IRELAND (Irish : Tuaisceart Éireann ( listen ); Ulster-Scots : Norlin Airlann) is a part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in the north-east of the island of Ireland
Ireland
, variously described as a country, province or region. Northern Ireland
Ireland
shares a border to the south and west with the Republic of Ireland
Ireland
. In 2011 , its population was 1,810,863, and down by 1.2 percentage points over the year, similar to the UK figure of 6.2%. 58.2% of those unemployed had been unemployed for over a year. Prominent artists and sportspeople from Northern Ireland
Ireland
include Van Morrison , Rory McIlroy , Joey Dunlop , Wayne McCullough and George Best
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Friedrich Christian Diez
FRIEDRICH CHRISTIAN DIEZ (15 March 1794 – 29 May 1876) was a German philologist . The two works on which his fame rests are the Grammar of the Romance Languages (published 1836-1844), and the Etymological Dictionary of the Romance Languages (1853, and later editions). He spent most of his career at University of Bonn . CONTENTS * 1 Biography * 2 Works * 3 Notes * 4 References * 5 External links BIOGRAPHYDiez was born at Giessen , in Hessen-Darmstadt . He was educated first at the gymnasium and then at the university of his native town and Göttingen . There he studied classics under Friedrich Gottlieb Welcker who had just returned from a two years' residence in Italy to fill the chair of archaeology and Greek literature. It was Welcker who kindled in him a love of Italian poetry, and thus gave the first outlet to his genius. In 1813 he joined the Hesse corps as a volunteer and served in the French campaign
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National Park
A NATIONAL PARK is a park in use for conservation purposes. Often it is a reserve of natural, semi-natural, or developed land that a sovereign state declares or owns. Although individual nations designate their own national parks differently, there is a common idea: the conservation of 'wild nature' for posterity and as a symbol of national pride. An international organization, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and its World Commission on Protected Areas , has defined "National Park" as its Category
Category
II type of protected areas . While this type of national park had been proposed previously, the United States established the first "public park or pleasuring-ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people", Yellowstone National Park
Park
, in 1872
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Nakuru
NAKURU is the fourth-largest city in Kenya
Kenya
, the capital of Nakuru County and former capital of the Rift Valley Province
Rift Valley Province
. It has 307,990 inhabitants, making it the largest urban centre in the Kenyan mid-west with Eldoret in Uasin Gishu following closely behind. Nakuru lies about 1,850 m above sea level
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Transitive Verb
A TRANSITIVE VERB is a verb that requires one or more objects . This contrasts with intransitive verbs , which do not have objects. Transitivity is traditionally thought of as a global property of a clause, by which activity is transferred from an agent to a patient . Transitive verbs can be classified by the number of objects they require. Verbs that require only two arguments , a subject and a single direct object , are monotransitive. Verbs that require two objects, a direct object and an indirect object, are "ditransitive ", or less commonly "bitransitive". An example of a ditransitive verb in English is the verb to give, which may feature a subject, an indirect object, and a direct object: John gave Mary the book. Verbs which take three objects are "tritransitive"
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England
ENGLAND is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
. It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain
Great Britain
(which lies in the North Atlantic ) in its centre and south, and includes over 100 smaller named islands such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight
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Public Domain
The legal term PUBLIC DOMAIN refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired, have been forfeited, have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable. For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven , and most of the early silent films , are all now in the public domain by either being created before copyrights existed or by their copyright term expiring. Examples for works not covered by copyright which are therefore in the public domain, are the formulae of Newtonian physics , cooking recipes , and all software before 1974. Examples for works actively dedicated into public domain by their authors are reference implementations of cryptographic algorithms , NIH 's ImageJ , and the CIA
CIA
's World Factbook
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Loanword
A LOANWORD (also LOAN WORD or LOAN-WORD) is a word adopted from one language (the donor language) and incorporated into another language without translation . This is in contrast to cognates , which are words in two or more languages that are similar because they share an etymological origin, and calques , which involve translation
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Dime Novel
The DIME NOVEL is a form of late 19th-century and early 20th-century U.S. popular fiction issued in series of inexpensive paperbound editions. The term dime novel has been used as a catchall term for several different but related forms, referring to dime novels, story papers , five- and ten-cent weeklies, "thick book" reprints, and sometimes early pulp magazines . The term was used as a title as late as 1940, in the short-lived pulp magazine Western Dime Novels. Dime novels are the antecedent of today's mass-market paperbacks , comic books , television shows and movies based on dime-novel genres. In the modern age, the term dime novel has been used to refer to quickly written, lurid potboilers , usually as a pejorative to describe a sensationalized but superficial literary work
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Epithet
An EPITHET (from Greek : ἐπίθετον epitheton, neuter of ἐπίθετος epithetos, "attributed, added" ) is a BYNAME, or a descriptive term (word or phrase), accompanying or occurring in place of a name and having entered common usage. It has various shades of meaning when applied to seemingly real or fictitious people, divinities, objects, and binomial nomenclature . It can also be a descriptive title: for example, Alfred the Great
Alfred the Great
, Suleiman the Magnificent or Władysław I the Elbow-high . In contemporary use, epithet often refers to an abusive, defamatory, or derogatory phrase, such as a racial or animal epithet . This use as a euphemism is criticized by Martin Manser and other proponents of linguistic prescription
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