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Gazette
A gazette is an official journal, a newspaper of record, or simply a newspaper. In English- and French-speaking countries, newspaper publishers have applied the name Gazette since the 17th century; today, numerous weekly and daily newspapers bear the name The Gazette.Contents1 Etymology 2 Government gazettes 3 Gazette as a verb 4 See also 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit] Gazette is a loanword from the French language; in turn, the French word is a 16th-century permutation of the Italian gazzetta, which is the name of a particular Venetian coin
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Friedrich Christian Diez
Friedrich Christian Diez
Friedrich Christian Diez
(15 March 1794 – 29 May 1876) was a German philologist. The two works on which his fame rests are the Grammar
Grammar
of the Romance Languages (published 1836-1844), and the Etymological Dictionary of the Romance Languages (1853, and later editions). He spent most of his career at University of Bonn.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Diez was born at Giessen, in Hessen-Darmstadt. He was educated first at the gymnasium and then at the university of his native town and Göttingen. There he studied classics under Friedrich Gottlieb Welcker who had just returned from a two years' residence in Italy to fill the chair of archaeology and Greek literature. It was Welcker who kindled in him a love of Italian poetry, and thus gave the first outlet to his genius. In 1813 he joined the Hesse corps as a volunteer and served in the French campaign
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Transitive Verb
A transitive verb is a verb that requires one or more objects. This contrasts with intransitive verbs, which do not have objects. Transitivity is traditionally thought as a global property of a clause, by which activity is transferred from an agent to a patient.[1] A verb that is followed by an object is called a transitive verb. Transitive verbs can be classified by the number of objects they require. Verbs that require only two arguments, a subject and a single direct object, are monotransitive. Verbs that require two objects, a direct object and an indirect object, are ditransitive,[2] or less commonly bitransitive.[3] An example of a ditransitive verb in English is the verb to give, which may feature a subject, an indirect object, and a direct object: John gave Mary the book
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Official Journal
Official Journal may refer to the public journal of several nations and other political organizations:Belgian Official Journal Journal Officiel de la République Française Official Journal of the European Patent Office Official Journal of the European UnionSee also[edit]Diario Oficial (other)This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Official Journal. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Nakuru
Nakuru
Nakuru
is the fourth-largest city in Kenya
Kenya
after Nairobi, Mombasa
Mombasa
and Kisumu. It is the capital of Nakuru County
Nakuru County
and former capital of the Rift Valley Province. It had 307,990 inhabitants within its town limits by 2009,[1] making it the largest urban centre in the Kenyan mid-west with Eldoret
Eldoret
in Uasin Gishu
Uasin Gishu
following closely behind
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Government Of The United Kingdom
Her Majesty's Government, commonly referred to as the UK government or British government, is the central government of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland.[3][4] The government is led by the Prime Minister, who selects all the remaining ministers. The prime minister and the other most senior ministers belong to the supreme decision-making committee, known as the Cabinet.[4] The government ministers all sit in Parliament, and are accountable to it. The government is dependent on Parliament to make primary legislation,[5] and since the Fixed-terms Parliaments Act 2011, general elections are held every five years to elect a new House of Commons, unless there is a successful vote of no confidence in the government or a two-thirds vote for a snap election (as was the case in 2017) in the House of Commons, in which case an election may be held sooner
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BirdLife International
BirdLife International (formerly the International Council for Bird Preservation) is a global partnership of conservation organisations that strives to conserve birds, their habitats and global biodiversity, working with people towards sustainability in the use of natural resources. It is the world's largest partnership of conservation organisations, with over 120 partner organisations.[1] It has a membership of more than 2.5 million people and partner organizations in more than 100 countries. Major partners include Britain’s Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, the Wild Bird Society of Japan, and the U.S. National Audubon Society. The group’s headquarters are located in Cambridge, UK. BirdLife International’s priorities include preventing extinction of bird species, identifying and safeguarding important sites for birds, maintaining and restoring key bird habitats, and empowering conservationists worldwide
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List Of English Words Of French Origin
A great number of words of French origin have entered the English language to the extent that many Latin words have come to the English language. According to different sources, 45% of all English words have a French origin.[1] This suggests that 80,000 words should appear in this list; this list, however, only includes words imported directly from French, such as both joy and joyous, and does not include derivatives formed in English of words borrowed from French, including joyful, joyfulness, partisanship, and parenthood. It also excludes both combinations of words of French origin with words whose origin is a language other than French — e. g.: ice cream, sunray, jellyfish, killjoy, lifeguard, and passageway— and English-made combinations of words of French origin — e. g.: grapefruit (grape + fruit), layperson (lay + person), mailorder, magpie, marketplace, surrender, petticoat, and straitjacket
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5] Other works are actively dedicated
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Merriam-Webster
Merriam–Webster, Incorporated, is an American company that publishes reference books, especially known for its dictionaries. In 1828, George and Charles Merriam founded the company as G & C Merriam Co. in Springfield, Massachusetts. In 1843, after Noah Webster died, the company bought the rights to An American Dictionary
Dictionary
of the English Language from Webster's estate. All Merriam–Webster dictionaries trace their lineage to this source. In 1964, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
acquired Merriam–Webster, Inc. as a subsidiary. The company adopted its current name in 1982.[1][2]Contents1 Origins1.1 Noah Webster 1.2 Merriam as publisher2 Services 3 Pronunciation guides 4 Writing entries 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOrigins[edit] Noah Webster[edit] In 1806, Webster published his first dictionary, A Compendious Dictionary
Dictionary
of the English Language
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
Ireland
(Irish: Tuaisceart Éireann [ˈt̪ˠuəʃcəɾˠt̪ˠ ˈeːɾʲən̪ˠ] ( listen);[8] Ulster-Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in the north-east of the island of Ireland,[9][10] variously described as a country, province or region.[11][12][13] Northern Ireland
Ireland
shares a border to the south and west with the Republic of Ireland. In 2011, its population was 1,810,863,[4] constituting about 30% of the island's total population and about 3% of the UK's population
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National Park
A national park is a park in use for conservation purposes. Often it is a reserve of natural, semi-natural, or developed land that a sovereign state declares or owns. Although individual nations designate their own national parks differently, there is a common idea: the conservation of 'wild nature' for posterity and as a symbol of national pride.[1] An international organization, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and its World Commission on Protected Areas, has defined "National Park" as its Category II type of protected areas. While this type of national park had been proposed previously, the United States established the first "public park or pleasuring-ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people", Yellowstone National Park, in 1872.[2] Although Yellowstone was not officially termed a "national park" in its establishing law, it was always termed such in practice[3] and is widely held to be the first and oldest national park in the world
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Corruption (linguistics)
Language
Language
change is variation over time in a language's phonological, morphological, semantic, syntactic, and other features. It is studied by historical linguistics and evolutionary linguistics
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Dime Novel
The dime novel is a form of late 19th-century and early 20th-century U.S. popular fiction issued in series of inexpensive paperbound editions
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