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Gaudí
Antoni Gaudí
Antoni Gaudí
i Cornet (Catalan pronunciation: [ənˈtɔni ɣəwˈði]; 25 June 1852 – 10 June 1926) was an architect. He is the best known practitioner of Catalan Modernism. Gaudí's works have a highly individualized, and one-of-a-kind style. Most are located in Barcelona, including his main work, the church of the Sagrada Família. Gaudí's work was influenced by his passions in life: architecture, nature, and religion.[3] He considered every detail of his creations and integrated into his architecture such crafts as ceramics, stained glass, wrought ironwork forging and carpentry. He also introduced new techniques in the treatment of materials, such as trencadís which used waste ceramic pieces. Under the influence of neo- Gothic art
Gothic art
and Oriental techniques, Gaudí became part of the Modernista movement which was reaching its peak in the late 19th and early 20th centuries
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Scale Model
A scale model is most generally a physical representation of an object, which maintains accurate relationships between all important aspects of the model, although absolute values of the original properties need not be preserved. This enables it to demonstrate some behavior or property of the original object without examining the original object itself. The most familiar scale models represent the physical appearance of an object in miniature, but there are many other kinds. Scale models are used in many fields including engineering, architecture, film making, military command, salesmanship, and hobby model building. While each field may use a scale model for a different purpose, all scale models are based on the same principles and must meet the same general requirements to be functional
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Auvergne (region)
Auvergne
Auvergne
(French pronunciation: [ovɛʁɲ] ( listen); Auvergnat (occitan): Auvèrnhe / Auvèrnha) is a former administrative region of France. Since 1 January 2016, it is part of the new region Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes.[3] It comprises four departments: Allier, Puy-de-Dôme, Cantal
Cantal
and Haute-Loire. The administrative region of Auvergne
Auvergne
is larger than the historical province of Auvergne, one of the seven counties of Occitania, and includes provinces and areas that historically were not part of Auvergne. The Auvergne
Auvergne
region is composed of the following old provinces:Auvergne: departments of Puy-de-Dôme, Cantal, northwest of Haute-Loire, and extreme south of Allier. The province of Auvergne
Auvergne
is entirely contained inside the Auvergne
Auvergne
region Bourbonnais: department of Allier
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World Heritage Sites
A World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
is a landmark or area which is selected by the United Nations
United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as having cultural, historical, scientific or other form of significance, and is legally protected by international treaties. The sites are judged important to the collective interests of humanity. To be selected, a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
must be an already classified landmark, unique in some respect as a geographically and historically identifiable place having special cultural or physical significance (such as an ancient ruin or historical structure, building, city, complex, desert, forest, island, lake, monument, mountain, or wilderness area)
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UNESCO
The United Nations
United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO;[2] French: Organisation des Nations unies pour l'éducation, la science et la culture) is a specialized agency of the United Nations (UN) based in Paris
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Roman Catholic
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Beatification
Beatification
Beatification
(from Latin
Latin
beatus, "blessed" and facere, "to make") is a recognition accorded by the
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Surname
A surname, family name, or last name is the portion of a personal name that indicates a person's family (or tribe or community, depending on the culture).[1] Depending on the culture all members of a family unit may have identical surnames or there may be variations based on the cultural rules. In the English-speaking world, a surname is commonly referred to as a last name because it is usually placed at the end of a person's full name, after any given names. In many parts of Asia, as well as some parts of Europe
Europe
and Africa, the family name is placed before a person's given name. In most Spanish-speaking and Portuguese-speaking countries, two surnames are commonly used and in some families that claim a connection to nobility even three are used. Surnames have not always existed and today are not universal in all cultures. This tradition has arisen separately in different cultures around the world
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Coppersmith
A coppersmith, also known as a brazier, is a person who makes artifacts from copper and brass. Brass
Brass
is an alloy of copper and zinc.The term redsmith is used for a tinsmith that uses tinsmithing tools and techniques to make copper items.Contents1 History 2 Coppersmith
Coppersmith
Trade 3 Examples of objects made by modern coppersmiths 4 Properties of copper 5 Notes 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Anthropologists believe copper to be the first metal used by humans due to its softness and ease to manipulate. In antiquity, copper's durability and resistance to rust or corrosion proved valuable. Copper's relationship with man is thought to date back over six thousand years.[1] Copper
Copper
was particularly worked in England, with ores smelted in Wales as early as the 1500s
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Baix Camp
Coordinates: 41°06′N 1°06′E / 41.1°N 1.1°E / 41.1; 1.1 Baix Camp
Baix Camp
is a comarca of Catalonia
Catalonia
in northeastern Spain. It is one of the three comarques into which Camp de Tarragona
Camp de Tarragona
was divided in the comarcal division of 1936. Baix Camp
Baix Camp
is located on the coast, between Tarragonès
Tarragonès
to the northeast and Baix Ebre
Baix Ebre
to the south. It also borders the comarques of Priorat, Ribera d'Ebre, Conca de Barberà, Alt Camp, and Tarragonès.Contents1 Population 2 Economy 3 Municipalities3.1 List of municipalities4 References 5 External linksPopulation[edit] Almost 150,000 people inhabit Baix Camp. The population has risen gently since the middle of the twentieth century, with population growth averaging 1.5% annually during the last three decades
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Three-dimensional
Three-dimensional space
Three-dimensional space
(also: 3-space or, rarely, tri-dimensional space) is a geometric setting in which three values (called parameters) are required to determine the position of an element (i.e., point). This is the informal meaning of the term dimension. In physics and mathematics, a sequence of n numbers can be understood as a location in n-dimensional space. When n = 3, the set of all such locations is called three-dimensional Euclidean space. It is commonly represented by the symbol ℝ3. This serves as a three-parameter model of the physical universe (that is, the spatial part, without considering time) in which all known matter exists. However, this space is only one example of a large variety of spaces in three dimensions called 3-manifolds
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Baptism
Baptism
Baptism
(from the Greek noun βάπτισμα baptisma; see below) is a Christian
Christian
sacrament of admission and adoption,[1] almost invariably with the use of water, into the Christian Church
Christian Church
generally.[2][3] The canonical Gospels report that Jesus
Jesus
was baptized[4]—a historical event to which a high degree of certainty can be assigned.[5][6][7] Baptism
Baptism
has been called a holy sacrament and an ordinance of Jesus Christ
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Orestes
In Greek mythology, Orestes
Orestes
(/ɒˈrɛstiːz/; Greek: Ὀρέστης [oréstɛːs]) was the son of Clytemnestra
Clytemnestra
and Agamemnon
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Hamlet
The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, often shortened to Hamlet (/ˈhæmlɪt/), is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
at an uncertain date between 1599 and 1602
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Montserrat (mountain)
Montserrat
Montserrat
(Catalan pronunciation: [munsəˈrat]) is a multi-peaked rocky range located near the city of Barcelona, in Catalonia, Spain. It is part of the Catalan Pre-Coastal Range. The main peaks are Sant Jeroni (1,236 m), Montgrós (1,120 m) and Miranda de les Agulles (903 m).[1] It is well known as the site of the Benedictine abbey, Santa Maria de Montserrat, which hosts the Virgin of Montserrat
Virgin of Montserrat
sanctuary and which is identified by some [2] with the location of the Holy Grail
Holy Grail
in Arthurian myth. "Montserrat" literally means "saw (serrated, like the common handsaw) mountain" in Catalan. It describes its peculiar aspect with multitude of rock formations which are visible from a great distance. The mountain is composed of strikingly pink conglomerate, a form of sedimentary rock
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Rheumatism
Rheumatism or rheumatic disorder is an umbrella term for conditions causing chronic, often intermittent pain affecting the joints and/or connective tissue. The study of, and therapeutic interventions in, such disorders is called rheumatology.[1] The term "rheumatism", however, does not designate any specific disorder, but covers at least 200 different conditions.[2] Sources dealing with rheumatism tend to focus on arthritis,[citation needed] but "rheumatism" may also refer to other conditions causing chronic pain, grouped as "non-articular rheumatism", also known as "regional pain syndrome" or "soft tissue rheumatism".[3] The term "Rheumatic Diseases" is used in MeSH to refer to connective tissue disorders.[4]Contents1 Types 2 Cause2.1 Weather3 Treatment 4 History 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksTypes[edit] Many rheumatic disorders of chronic, intermittent joint pain have historically been caused by infectious diseases
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