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Gatineau Park
Gatineau
Gatineau
Park (French: Parc de la Gatineau) is located in the Outaouais
Outaouais
region of Quebec, Canada. Administered by the National Capital Commission as part of the National Capital Region, Gatineau Park is a 361 square kilometres (139 sq mi) wedge of land extending north and west from the city of Gatineau. With a perimeter of 179.2 kilometres (111.3 mi), the park includes parts of the municipalities of Chelsea, Pontiac, La Pêche, and the City of Gatineau. The main entrance to the park is 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) north of downtown Ottawa, Ontario. The park's area has a long history of human inhabitation and usage predating the arrival of European settlers. Its more recent pre-park history includes various forms of human exploitation such as farming, logging, hunting, and industrial activity
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IUCN
The International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN; officially International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
and Natural Resources[2]) is an international organization working in the field of nature conservation and sustainable use of natural resources. It is involved in data gathering and analysis, research, field projects, advocacy, and education. IUCN's mission is to "influence, encourage and assist societies throughout the world to conserve nature and to ensure that any use of natural resources is equitable and ecologically sustainable". Over the past decades, IUCN has widened its focus beyond conservation ecology and now incorporates issues related to sustainable development in its projects. Unlike many other international environmental organisations, IUCN does not itself aim to mobilize the public in support of nature conservation
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Government Of Canada
Provincial and territorial executive councilsPremiersLegislative (Queen-in-Parliament) Federal parliamentSenateSpeaker of the Senate Government
Government
Leader in the Senate Opposition Leader in the Senate Senate divisionsHouse of CommonsSpeaker of the house Government
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Rocky Mountains
The Rocky Mountains, commonly known as the Rockies, are a major mountain range in western North America. The Rocky Mountains
Rocky Mountains
stretch more than 3,000 miles (4,800 km) from the northernmost part of British Columbia, in western Canada, to New Mexico, in the Southwestern United States. Within the North American Cordillera, the Rockies are somewhat distinct from the Pacific Coast Ranges
Pacific Coast Ranges
and the Cascade Range
Cascade Range
and Sierra Nevada, which all lie further to the west. The Rocky Mountains
Rocky Mountains
were initially formed from 80 million to 55 million years ago during the Laramide orogeny, in which a number of plates began to slide underneath the North American plate. The angle of subduction was shallow, resulting in a broad belt of mountains running down western North America
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National Parks Act (Canada)
The Canada
Canada
National Parks Act, An Act respecting the national parks of Canada
Canada
(the Act) is a Canadian federal law that regulates protection of natural areas of national significance. The Dominion Forest Reserves and Parks Act was passed in 1927, followed by the first National Parks Act in 1930.[1] The current Canada
Canada
National Parks Act was assented on October 20, 2000 and has been amended since.Contents1 Park lands1.1 National parks 1.2 National parks reserves 1.3 Wilderness areas2 Establishing parks 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksPark lands[edit] National parks[edit]Banff Park - Canada's first National ParkThe Act enables Parks Canada
Canada
to designate and maintain national parks and national park reserves. Within these, additional wildland areas may be designated
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James B. Harkin
James B. Harkin (30 January 1875 – 27 January 1955), also known as the Father of National Parks, was a Canadian-born journalist turned bureaucrat with a passion for conservation but also widely renowned for his commodification of the Canadian landscape. Harkin began his career as a journalist under the umbrella of the Ottawa Daily and Montreal Herald, two conservative newspapers at the time, but soon through his persistence and prowess gained entry into civil service during his mid-twenties. Under the tutelage of some influential figures working for the Liberal Party of Canada, most notably Clifford Sifton and Frank Oliver, Harkin was able to acquire an appointment to be the first commissioner of the Dominion Parks Branch
Dominion Parks Branch
in 1911
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National Park
A national park is a park in use for conservation purposes. Often it is a reserve of natural, semi-natural, or developed land that a sovereign state declares or owns. Although individual nations designate their own national parks differently, there is a common idea: the conservation of 'wild nature' for posterity and as a symbol of national pride.[1] An international organization, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and its World Commission on Protected Areas, has defined "National Park" as its Category II type of protected areas. While this type of national park had been proposed previously, the United States established the first "public park or pleasuring-ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people", Yellowstone National Park, in 1872.[2] Although Yellowstone was not officially termed a "national park" in its establishing law, it was always termed such in practice[3] and is widely held to be the first and oldest national park in the world
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Charles Ramsay Devlin
Charles Ramsay Devlin
Charles Ramsay Devlin
(29 October 1858 – 1 March 1914) was a Canadian politician who was a Member of Parliament (MP) in the House of Commons of Canada, in the Legislative Assembly of Quebec, and an Irish MP in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom
House of Commons of the United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Ireland. Career[edit] Born in Aylmer, Lower Canada, the son of Charles Devlin and Ellen Roney, his father was a merchant from Roscommon
Roscommon
in Ireland. After attending the Petit Séminaire de Montréal from 1871 to 1877, he studied at the Université Laval
Université Laval
in the faculty of arts from 1879 to 1881 but did not graduate
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Canadian House Of Commons
Her Majesty's Government     Liberal Party (183)Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition     Conservative Party (97)Other parties:Parties with official status     New Democratic Party
New Democratic Party
(44)Parties without official status     Quebec
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James Harkin
James B. Harkin (30 January 1875 – 27 January 1955), also known as the Father of National Parks, was a Canadian-born journalist turned bureaucrat with a passion for conservation but also widely renowned for his commodification of the Canadian landscape. Harkin began his career as a journalist under the umbrella of the Ottawa Daily and Montreal Herald, two conservative newspapers at the time, but soon through his persistence and prowess gained entry into civil service during his mid-twenties. Under the tutelage of some influential figures working for the Liberal Party of Canada, most notably Clifford Sifton and Frank Oliver, Harkin was able to acquire an appointment to be the first commissioner of the Dominion Parks Branch in 1911
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Ottawa River
The Ottawa
Ottawa
River
River
(French: Rivière des Outaouais, Algonquin: Kitchissippi), is a river in the Canadian provinces of Ontario
Ontario
and Quebec. For most of its length, it defines the border between these two provinces. It is a major tributary of the St. Lawrence River.Contents1 Geography 2 Geology 3 History 4 Power generation4.1 Hydroelectric installations5 See also 6 References 7 External linksGeography[edit] The river rises at Lake Capimitchigama, in the Laurentian Mountains
Laurentian Mountains
of central Quebec, and flows west to Lake Timiskaming
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Ottawa Valley
Coordinates: 45°30′N 76°06′W / 45.5°N 76.1°W / 45.5; -76.1 Ottawa
Ottawa
river crossing the Ottawa
Ottawa
valley near the city of Ottawa. At the front, skirts of the Gatineau Hills
Gatineau Hills
makes up part of the southern tip of the Canadian ShieldThe Ottawa
Ottawa
Valley is the valley of the Ottawa
Ottawa
River, along the boundary between Eastern Ontario
Eastern Ontario
and the Outaouais, Quebec, Canada. The valley is the transition between the Saint Lawrence Lowlands
Saint Lawrence Lowlands
and the Canadian Shield. Because of the surrounding shield, the valley is narrow at its western end, then becomes increasingly wide (mainly on the Ontario
Ontario
side of the river) as it progresses eastward
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Hiking
Hiking
Hiking
is the preferred term, in Canada and the United States, for a long, vigorous walk, usually on trails (footpaths), in the countryside, while the word walking is used for shorter, particularly urban walks. On the other hand, in the United Kingdom, and the Republic of Ireland, the word "walking" is acceptable to describe all forms of walking, whether it is a walk in the park or backpacking in the Alps. The word hiking is also often used in the UK, along with rambling (a slightly old-fashioned term), hillwalking, and fell walking (a term mostly used for hillwalking in northern England)
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Mountain Bike
A mountain bike or mountain bicycle (abbreviated Mtn Bike or MTB[1]) is a bicycle designed for off-road cycling. Mountain bikes share similarities with other bikes, but incorporate features designed to enhance durability and performance in rough terrain. These typically include a front or full suspension, large knobby tires, more durable wheels, more powerful brakes, lower gear ratios for climbing steep grades, and higher gear ratios for going down steep grades.[citation needed] Mountain bikes are typically ridden on mountain trails, singletrack, fire roads, and other unpaved surfaces. This type of terrain commonly has rocks, roots, loose dirt, and steep grades. Many trails have additional TTF's (Technical Trail Features) such as log piles, log rides, rock gardens, skinnies, gap jumps, and wall-rides. Mountain bikes are built to handle these types of terrain and features
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Camp Fortune
Camp Fortune is a commercial alpine ski centre. It is located in the municipality of Chelsea in the Gatineau Hills north of Gatineau, Quebec, approximately 15 minutes from Downtown Ottawa, Ontario. Camp Fortune is composed of 3 sides, the Valley, Meech and Skyline. Pineault, Clifford and Alexander are jointly referred to as The Valley and are considered to host the easier slopes of the ski centre. Meech offers intermediate terrain and Skyline offers advanced terrain. During the summer, Camp Fortune operates an aerial park and zip lines and offers downhill and cross country mountain biking. In addition the ski lodge is available for rent as a banquet venue. Ryan Tower, is a 228.9 metre (750 feet) tall guyed mast that was built in the 60's, and is located at the summit of the Clifford slope. A shorter tower, 38 meters (123.5') dating from 1961 was the original antenna support structure for the radio station CFMO-FM
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