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Gardiner Museum
The Gardiner Museum is Canada's national ceramics museum. It was founded by George and Helen Gardiner in 1984 to house their collection of ceramic art. It is located on Queen’s Park just south of Bloor Street in Toronto, opposite the Ontario Museum">Royal Ontario Museum
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The Italian Renaissance (Italian: Rinascimento [rinaʃʃiˈmento]) was the earliest manifestation of the general European Renaissance, a period of great cultural change and achievement that began in Italy during the 14th century (Trecento) and lasted until the 17th century (Seicento), marking the transition between Medieval and Modern Europe. The French word renaissance (Rinascimento in Italian) means "Rebirth" and defines the period as one of renewed interest in the culture of classical antiquity after the centuries labeled the Dark Ages by Renaissance humanism"> Renaissance humanists, as well as an era of economic revival after the Black Death of 1348
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Canadian Museums Association
The Canadian Museums Association (CMA) is a national non-profit organization for the promotion of museums in Canada. It represents Canadian museum professionals both within Canada and internationally. As with most trade associations, it aims to improve the recognition, growth and stability of its constituency. It's staff supports their nearly 2,000 members with conferences, publications, and networking opportunities. CMA members include national museums, non-profit museums, art galleries, science centres, aquariums, archives, sport halls-of-fame, artist-run centres, zoos and historic sites across Canada. They range from large metropolitan galleries to small community museums
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English Delftware
English delftware is tin-glazed pottery made in the British Isles between about 1550 and the late 18th century. The main centres of production were London, Bristol and Liverpool with smaller centres at Wincanton, Glasgow and Dublin. English tin-glazed pottery was called "galleyware" and its makers "gallypotters" until the early 18th century; it was given the name delftware after the tin-glazed pottery from the Netherlands, which it often copied, but "delftware" is not usually capitalized. Many everyday wares were made: tiles, mugs, drug jars, dishes, wine bottles, posset pots, salt pots, candlesticks, fuddling cups (that is, ale mugs joined in groups of three, four or five with connecting holes to confuse the drinker), puzzle jugs (similar to fuddling cups), barber's bowls, pill slabs, bleeding bowls, porringers and flower bricks
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Ceramics Of Indigenous Peoples Of The Americas
Native American pottery is an art form with at least a 7500-year history in the Americas. Pottery is fired ceramics with clay as a component
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University Of Toronto
The University of Toronto (U of T, UToronto, or Toronto) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada on the grounds that surround Queen's Park. It was founded by royal charter in 1827 as King's College, the first institution of higher learning in the colony of Upper Canada. Originally controlled by the Church of England, the university assumed the present name in 1850 upon becoming a secular institution. As a collegiate university, it comprises eleven colleges, which differ in character and history, each with substantial autonomy on financial and institutional affairs
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined
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Enoch Turner School
Enoch Turner Schoolhouse is an historic site and museum owned by the Ontario Heritage Trust. The school was built in 1848, when it was known as the Ward School. The building is located at 106 Trinity Street between King St. E
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Special
Special or the specials or variation, may refer to:

Line 2 Bloor–Danforth
Line 2 Bloor–Danforth is a subway line in the Toronto subway system, operated by the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC). It has 31 stations and is 26.2 kilometres (16.3 mi) in length. It opened on February 26, 1966, and extensions at both ends were completed in 1968 and again in 1980. The most travelled part of the line is located in Old Toronto's midtown area known as Yorkville. In this area, the subway also connects to Line 1 Yonge–University at Spadina, St. George and Yonge stations. Towards the east, the line runs parallel to Danforth Avenue serving areas such as Greektown and the East Danforth, it then continues further to the east through a very short stretch in East York to its eastern terminus in Scarborough, where it connects to Line 3 Scarborough
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Line 1 Yonge–University
Line 1 Yonge–University is the oldest and busiest line of the Toronto subway in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is operated by the Toronto Transit Commission, has 38 stations and is 38.8 km (24.1 mi) in length. It opened as the "Yonge subway" in 1954 as Canada's first underground passenger rail line, and was extended multiple times between 1963 and 2017. Averaging over 736,000 riders per weekday, Line 1 is the busiest rapid transit line in Canada, and one of the busiest lines in North America. The eastern portion of the line runs under Yonge Street from its northeastern terminus at Finch Avenue to Toronto Union Station, connecting with Line 4 Sheppard at Sheppard–Yonge and Line 2 Bloor–Danforth at Bloor–Yonge. The western portion continues north from Union along University Avenue to St. George and Spadina, which both connect to Line 2
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Canada
Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres (3.85 million square miles), making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Its southern United States border">border with the United States, stretching some 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi), is the world's longest bi-national land border. Canada's capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. As a whole, Canada is sparsely populated, the majority of its land area being dominated by forest and tundra. Its population is highly urbanized, with over 80 percent of its inhabitants concentrated in large and medium-sized cities, and 70 percent of citizens residing within 100 kilometres (62 mi) of the southern border
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Ontario
Ontario (/ɒnˈtɛəri/ (About this sound listen); French: [ɔ̃taʁjo]) is one of the 13 provinces and territories of Canada and is located in east-central Canada. It is Canada's most populous province accounting for nearly 40 percent of the country's population, and is the second-largest province in total area. Ontario is fourth-largest in total area when the territories of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are included. It is home to the nation's capital city, Ottawa, and the nation's Canada by population">most populous city, Toronto, which is also Ontario's provincial capital. Ontario is bordered by the province of Manitoba to the west, Hudson Bay and James Bay to the north, and Quebec to the east and northeast, and to the south by the U.S
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