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Gannett
Gannett Company, Inc. is a publicly traded American media holding company headquartered in Tysons Corner, Virginia, near McLean in Greater Washington DC.[3][4] It is the largest U.S. newspaper publisher as measured by total daily circulation. Its assets include the national newspaper USA Today
USA Today
and the erstwhile weekly USA Weekend. Its largest non-national newspaper is The Arizona Republic in Phoenix, Arizona
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CBS Corporation
CBS
CBS
Corporation is an American mass media corporation focused on commercial broadcasting, publishing, and television production, with most of its operations in the United States. The president, chief executive and executive chairman of the company is Leslie Moonves. Sumner Redstone, owner of National Amusements, controls CBS
CBS
by way of his majority ownership of the company's Class A voting stock; he also serves as chairman emeritus. It is currently the world's fifth largest entertainment company in terms of revenue, after Comcast, The Walt Disney Company, Time Warner and 21st Century Fox.[citation needed] The company began trading on the NYSE on January 3, 2006. Until then, the corporation was known as Viacom, and is the legal successor to said company.[3] A new company, keeping the Viacom
Viacom
name, was spun off from CBS
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Net Income
In business, net income (total comprehensive income, net earnings, net profit, informally, bottom line) is an entity's income minus cost of goods sold, expenses and taxes for an accounting period.[1] It is computed as the residual of all revenues and gains over all expenses and losses for the period,[2] and has also been defined as the net increase in shareholders' equity that results from a company's operations.[3] In the context of the presentation of financial statements, the IFRS Foundation
IFRS Foundation
defines net income as synonymous with profit and loss.[1] Net income
Net income
is the same as net profit but a distinct accounting concept from profit
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Viacom (original)
The original incarnation of Viacom
Viacom
Inc. (originally an initialism of Video & Audio Communications) was an American media conglomerate. During the 1970s and 1980s, Viacom
Viacom
was a prominent distributor of syndicated CBS
CBS
television series. They also distributed syndicated shows which originated during the 1980s, with the biggest examples being The Cosby Show
The Cosby Show
and Roseanne
Roseanne
(which were produced by Carsey-Werner Productions, who eventually began distributing their own programming)
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Infinity Broadcasting
Infinity Broadcasting Corporation
Infinity Broadcasting Corporation
was a radio company that existed from 1972 until 2005. It was founded by Michael A. Wiener and Gerald Carrus. It became associated with popular radio personalities like Opie and Anthony, Howard Stern, Don Imus and Mike Francesa. Infinity merged with CBS Corporation
CBS Corporation
in 1997 and later became part of Viacom
Viacom
in 2000, when CBS
CBS
and Viacom
Viacom
merged
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Conservatism
Conservatism
Conservatism
is a political and social philosophy promoting traditional social institutions in the context of culture and civilization. The central tenets of conservatism include tradition, human imperfection, organic society, hierarchy and authority and property rights.[1] Conservatives seek to preserve a range of institutions such as monarchy, religion, parliamentary government and property rights with the aim of emphasizing social stability and continuity[2] while the more extreme elements called reactionaries oppose modernism and seek a return to "the way things were".[3][4] The first established use of the term in a political context originated in 1818 with François-René de Chateaubriand[5] during the period of Bourbon restoration
Bourbon restoration
that sought to roll back the policies of the French Revolution
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Corporate Spin-off
A corporate spin-off, also known as a spin-out,[1] or starburst, is a type of corporate action where a company "splits off" a section as a separate business.[2]Contents1 Characteristics1.1 U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission 1.2 Other definitions2 Reasons for spin-offs2.1 Conglomerate discount3 Examples3.1 Academia 3.2 Mirror companies4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingCharacteristics[edit] Spin-offs are divisions of companies or organizations that then become independent businesses with assets, employees, intellectual property, technology, or existing products that are taken from the parent company. Shareholders of the parent company receive equivalent shares in the new company in order to compensate for the loss of equity in the original stocks
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The News-Press
News-Press may refer to:Santa Barbara News-Press, Santa Barbara, California The News-Press, Fort Myers, Florida Falls Church News-Press, Falls Church Virginia News-Press & Gazette Company, media company in St. Joseph, MissouriSt. Joseph News-Press, newspaper in St
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Louisville, Kentucky
Louisville (/ˈluːəvəl/ ( listen) LOO-ə-vəl, /ˈlʊvəl/ ( listen) LUUV-əl or /ˈluːiːvɪl/ ( listen)) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Kentucky
Kentucky
and the 29th-most populous city in the United States.[d][5] It is one of two cities in Kentucky
Kentucky
designated as first-class, the other being the state's second-largest city of Lexington.[e] Louisville is the historical seat and, since 2003, the nominal seat of Jefferson County. Louisville was founded in 1778 by George Rogers Clark
George Rogers Clark
and is named after King Louis XVI of France, making Louisville one of the oldest cities west of the Appalachian Mountains. Sited beside the Falls of the Ohio, the only major obstruction to river traffic between the upper Ohio River
Ohio River
and the Gulf of Mexico, the settlement first grew as a portage site
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Nashville, Tennessee
Nashville
Nashville
(/ˈnæʃvɪl/[6]) is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Tennessee
Tennessee
and the seat of Davidson County.[7] It is located on the Cumberland River
Cumberland River
in northern Middle Tennessee. The city is a center for the music,[8] healthcare, publishing, private prison,[9] banking and transportation industries, and is home to numerous colleges and universities. Since 1963, Nashville
Nashville
has had a consolidated city-county government, which includes six smaller municipalities in a two-tier system. The city is governed by a mayor, a vice-mayor, and a 40-member Metropolitan Council; 35 of the members are elected from single-member districts, while the other five are elected at-large
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Phoenix, Arizona
Phoenix (/ˈfiːnɪks/) is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Arizona. With 1,615,017 people (as of 2016[update]), Phoenix is the fifth most populous city nationwide, the most populous state capital in the United States, and the only state capital with a population of more than one million residents.[5][6] Phoenix is the anchor of the Phoenix metropolitan area, also known as the Valley of the Sun, which in turn is a part of the Salt River Valley
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Greater Washington DC
Washington most commonly refers to: George Washington
George Washington
(1732–1799), the first President of the United States Washington (state), United States Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States The
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Holding Company
A holding company is a company that owns other companies' outstanding stock. A holding company usually does not produce goods or services itself; rather, its purpose is to own shares of other companies to form a corporate group. Holding companies allow the reduction of risk for the owners and can allow the ownership and control of a number of different companies. In the United States, 80% of stock, in voting and value, must be owned before tax consolidation benefits such as tax-free dividends can be claimed.[1] That is, if Company A owns 80% or more of the stock of Company B, Company A will not pay taxes on dividends paid by Company B to its stockholders, as the payment of dividends from B to A is essentially transferring cash from one company to the other
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Subsidiary
A subsidiary, subsidiary company or daughter company[1][2][3] is a company that is owned or controlled by another company, which is called the parent company, parent, or holding company.[4][5] The subsidiary can be a company, corporation, or limited liability company. In some cases it is a government or state-owned enterprise. In some cases, particularly in the music and book publishing industries, subsidiaries are referred to as imprints. In the United States railroad industry, an operating subsidiary is a company that is a subsidiary but operates with its own identity, locomotives and rolling stock
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Division (business)
A division of a business, sometimes called a business sector, is one of the parts into which a business, organization or company is divided.[1] The divisions are distinct parts of that business. If these divisions are all part of the same company, then that company is legally responsible for all of the obligations and debts of the divisions. However, in a large organization, various parts of the business may be run by different subsidiaries, and a business division may include one or many subsidiaries. Each subsidiary is a separate legal entity owned by the primary business or by another subsidiary in the hierarchy. Often a division operates under a separate name and is the equivalent of a corporation or limited liability company obtaining a fictitious name or "doing business as" certificate and operating a business under that fictitious name. Companies often set up business units to operate in divisions prior to the legal formation of subsidiaries. Generally, only an "entity", e.g
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Equity (finance)
In accounting, equity (or owner's equity) is the difference between the value of the assets and the value of the liabilities of something owned. It is governed by the following equation: Equity = Assets − Liabilities displaystyle text Equity = text Assets - text Liabilities For example, if someone owns a car worth $15,000 (an asset), but owes $5,000 on a loan against that car (a liability), the car represents $10,000 of equity. Equity can be negative if liabilities exceed assets. Shareholders' equity (or stockholders' equity, shareholders' funds, shareholders' capital or similar terms) represents the equity of a company as divided among shareholders of common or preferred stock. Negative shareholders' equity is often referred to as a shareholders' deficit. Alternatively, equity can also refer to the capital stock of a corporation. The value of the stock depends on the corporation's future economic prospects
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