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Gangotri
Gangotri
Gangotri
is a town and a Nagar Panchayat (municipality) in Uttarkashi district in the state of Uttarakhand, India. It is a Hindu pilgrim town on the banks of the river Bhagirathi
Bhagirathi
and origin of River Ganges. It is on the Greater Himalayan Range, at a height of 3,100 metres (10,200 ft)
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Sumati (mythology)
In Hindu mythology, Sagara (Sanskrit: सगर; IAST: Sagara) is a prominent king of the Suryavansha dynasty in Satya Yuga. He has two wives, one a princess of the Vidarbha, and the other from royal lineage of Sivi,[1] and is an ancestor to Bhagiratha, Dasharatha and Rama.Contents1 Birth of Ganga 2 Jain Tradition 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further readingBirth of Ganga[edit] King Sagara performed a horse sacrifice (Ashwamedha yajna) to prove his supremacy. Lord Indra, the leader of the demigods, became fearful over the results of the yajna, so he decided to steal the horse. He left the horse at the ashram of Kapila, who was in deep meditation. King Sagar’s 60,000 sons (born of Queen Sumati), and his son Asamanja (born of Queen Amba) were then sent to find the horse. When the 60,000 sons found the horse at Kapiladeva’s ashram, they thought he had stolen it. When they prepared to attack the meditating rishi (sage), Kapila opened his eyes
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Hindu Temple
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Ashram
Traditionally, an ashram-Hindi ( Sanskrit
Sanskrit
ashrama or ashramam) is a spiritual hermitage or a monastery in Indian religions.[1][2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Overview 3 Schools in Maharashtra 4 In the West 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The wording ashram (Sanskrit: आश्रम, Sanskrit pronunciation: [aːɕɽəmə]) comes from the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
root śram- (श्रम्) which means "to toil".[3] According to S. S. Chandra, the term means "a step in the journey of life".[4] In contrast, according to George Weckman, the term ashram connotes a place where one strives towards a goal in a disciplined manner
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Nepalis
Nepalis
Nepalis
or Nepalese (Nepali: नेपाली) also known as Gurkha or Gorkhali are citizens of the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal under the provisions of Nepali nationality law.[13][14] The country is home to people of many different national and ethnic origins. As a result, people of Nepal
Nepal
do not equate their nationality with ethnicity, but with citizenship and allegiance. Although citizens make up the majority of Nepalese, non-citizen residents, dual citizen, and expatriates may also claim a Nepalese identity. Nepalese are descendants of migrants from parts of India, Tibet, and parts of Burma and Yunnan, and much further traces origin to Central Asia, along with indigenous peoples. Nepal
Nepal
is a multicultural and multiethnic country
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Bhagiratha
Bhagiratha
Bhagiratha
(Sanskrit: भगीरथ, bhagīratha) was a great king who brought the River Ganges, personified as the river goddess Ganga, to Earth from the heavens. When he was prince of Sagar Dynasty, he did penance for a thousand years on the advice of his guru Trithala, to gain the release his 60,000 great-uncles from the curse of saint Kapila
Kapila
which eventually led to descent of the goddess Ganga in the form of the river Ganges, to the earth.[1] To commemorate his efforts, the head stream of the river is called Bhagirathi, till it meets Alaknanda River
Alaknanda River
at Devprayag. See also[edit]Bhagrathi community (Western UP)References[edit]^ Mankodi, Kirit (1973) "Gaṅgā Tripathagā"Artibus Asiae 35(1/2): pp. 139-144, p
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Moksha
Moksha
Moksha
(/ˈmoʊkʃə/; Sanskrit: मोक्ष, mokṣa), also called vimoksha, vimukti and mukti,[1] is a term in Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism
Jainism
which refers to various
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Census
A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agriculture, business, and traffic censuses. The United Nations
United Nations
defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years
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Hinduism
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Asamanja
Asamanja (असमंज) or Asamanjan was a oldest son of Sagara and Keshini (In some Purana's it is Sumati). Sagara had 60,000 sons from wife Sumati and one son from Keshini.[1] Story[edit] According to Valmiki's account in Ramayana, he was a wild and wicked young man. He used to throw young boys playing in Sarayu
Sarayu
river into great depths and see them drown.Thus his father Sagara exiled him.[2][1] But his son Amshuman from his wife Ambujakshi succeeded Sagara as the king of Ayodhya. According to Srimad Bhagavatam
Srimad Bhagavatam
Chapter 8 of canto 9, in his previous birth, Asamanja had been a great mystic yogi, but by bad association he had fallen from his exalted position
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Nagar Panchayat
Executive:Prime Minister Union Council of Ministers Cabinet Secretary Secretaries: (Defence • Finance • Foreign • Home) Civil services All India
India
Services (IAS • IFS/IFoS • IPS)Parliament: Rajya Sabha
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Yajna
Yajna
Yajna
(IAST: yajña) literally means "sacrifice, devotion, worship, offering", and refers in Hinduism
Hinduism
to any ritual done in front of a sacred fire, often with mantras.[1] Yajna
Yajna
has been a Vedic tradition, described in a layer of Vedic literature called Brahmanas, as well as Yajurveda.[2] The tradition has evolved from offering oblations and libations into sacred fire to symbolic offerings in the presence of sacred fire (Agni).[1] Yajna
Yajna
rituals-related texts have been called the Karma-kanda (ritual works) portion of the Vedic literature, in contrast to Jnana-kanda (knowledge) portion contained in the Vedic Upanishads
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Indra
Indra
Indra
(/ˈɪndrə/, Sanskrit: इन्द्र) is a Vedic deity in Hinduism,[1] a guardian deity in Buddhism,[2] and the king of the highest heaven called Saudharmakalpa in Jainism.[3] His mythologies and powers are similar, though not identical to those of the Indo-European deities such as Zeus, Jupiter, Perun, Thor, and Odin (Wotan).[1][4][5] In the Vedas, Indra
Indra
is the king of Svarga
Svarga
(Heaven) and the Devas. He is the god of the heavens, lightning, thunder, storms, rains and river flows.[6] Indra
Indra
is the most referred to deity in the Rigveda.[7] He is celebrated for his powers, and the one who kills the great symbolic evil (Asura) named Vritra
Vritra
who obstructs human prosperity and happiness
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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King Sagara
In Hindu mythology, Sagara (Sanskrit: सगर; IAST: Sagara) is a prominent king of the Suryavansha
Suryavansha
dynasty in Satya Yuga. He has two wives, one a princess of the Vidarbha, and the other from royal lineage of Sivi,[1] and is an ancestor to Bhagiratha, Dasharatha
Dasharatha
and Rama.Contents1 Birth of Ganga 2 Jain Tradition 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further readingBirth of Ganga[edit] King Sagara
King Sagara
performed a horse sacrifice (Ashwamedha yajna) to prove his supremacy. Lord Indra, the leader of the demigods, became fearful over the results of the yajna, so he decided to steal the horse. He left the horse at the ashram of Kapila, who was in deep meditation. King Sagar’s 60,000 sons (born of Queen Sumati), and his son Asamanja (born of Queen Amba) were then sent to find the horse
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Vehicle Registration Plate
A vehicle registration plate, also known as a number plate (British English) or a license plate (American English), is a metal or plastic plate attached to a motor vehicle or trailer for official identification purposes. All countries require registration plates for road vehicles such as cars, trucks, and motorcycles. Whether they are required for other vehicles, such as bicycles, boats, or tractors, may vary by jurisdiction. The registration identifier is a numeric or alphanumeric ID that uniquely identifies the vehicle owner within the issuing region's vehicle register. In some countries, the identifier is unique within the entire country, while in others it is unique within a state or province. Whether the identifier is associated with a vehicle or a person also varies by issuing agency
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