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Galtymore
Galtymore
Galtymore
or Galteemore (Irish: Cnoc Mór na nGaibhlte, meaning "big hill of the Galtys")[3] is a 919 m (3015 ft) mountain on the border between counties Limerick and Tipperary, Republic of Ireland. It is the highest of the Galty Mountains and the 14th highest peak in Ireland.[1] Galtymore
Galtymore
is notable in that it is the tallest inland mountain in Ireland, and the only inland peak to exceed 915 m (3000 ft). The townland that covers the southern face of Galtymore
Galtymore
is called Knocknagalty (Cnoc na nGaibhlte).[4][5] Galtymore is informally referred to as one of the Irish Munros and is classed as a Furth by the Scottish Mountaineering Club, i.e
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Summit
A summit is a point on a surface that is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. Mathematically, a summit is a local maximum in elevation. The topographic terms "acme", "apex", "peak", and "zenith" are synonymous.Contents1 Definition1.1 Western United States 1.2 Summit
Summit
climbing equipment2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDefinition[edit] The term "top" is generally used only for a mountain peak that is located some distance from the nearest point of higher elevation. For example, a big massive rock next to the main summit of a mountain is not considered a summit. Summits near a higher peak, with some prominence or isolation, but not reaching a certain cutoff value for the quantities, are often considered subsummits (or subpeaks) of the higher peak, and are considered as part of the same mountain. A pyramidal peak is an exaggerated form produced by ice erosion of a mountain top
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Mountain
A mountain is a large landform that stretches above the surrounding land in a limited area, usually in the form of a peak. A mountain is generally steeper than a hill. Mountains are formed through tectonic forces or volcanism. These forces can locally raise the surface of the earth. Mountains erode slowly through the action of rivers, weather conditions, and glaciers. A few mountains are isolated summits, but most occur in huge mountain ranges. High elevations on mountains produce colder climates than at sea level
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Munster
Patron Saint: Ailbe
Ailbe
of Emly[3] a. ^ Munster
Munster
is part of the South constituency; the six Munster counties contain 74.1% of the population of this constituency.[4] Munster
Munster
(Irish: an Mhumhain / Cúige Mumhan, pronounced [ə ˈvuːnʲ], [ˌkuːgʲə ˈmuːn]) is one of the provinces of Ireland situated in the south of Ireland. In early Ireland, the Kingdom of Munster
Munster
was one of the kingdoms of Gaelic Ireland
Gaelic Ireland
ruled by a "king of over-kings" Irish: rí ruirech. Following the Norman invasion of Ireland, the ancient kingdoms were shired into counties for administrative and judicial purposes. In later centuries, local government legislation has seen further sub-division of the historic counties. Munster
Munster
has no official function for local government purposes
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Skeheenarinky
Skeheenarinky
Skeheenarinky
(Irish: Sceichín na Rince, meaning "The Dancing Bush")[1] is a townland in south-west County Tipperary, Ireland. It is a dispersed settlement with a focal point at Skeheenarinky
Skeheenarinky
Cross where a school is located.Contents1 Location 2 School 3 History 4 People 5 References 6 External linksLocation[edit] Situated between the foothills of the Galtee Mountains
Galtee Mountains
and the low-lying farmland at the north end of Ballyporeen
Ballyporeen
civil parish. It lies on a stretch of the former main Cork- Dublin
Dublin
road that was superseded by the M8 Motorway in 2008.[2] This road is now designated as the R639
R639
regional road. Mitchelstown
Mitchelstown
and Cahir
Cahir
are approximately 10 km. and 20 km
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Topographic Prominence
In topography, prominence[a] characterizes the height of a mountain or hill's summit by the vertical distance between it and the lowest contour line encircling it but containing no higher summit within it. It is a measure of the independence of a summit. A peak's key col is a unique point on this contour line and the parent peak is some higher mountain, selected according to various objective criteria.Contents1 Definitions 2 Illustration 3 In mountaineering 4 Parent peak4.1 Encirclement or island parentage 4.2 Prominence parentage 4.3 Line parentage 4.4 Other criteria5 Issues in choice of summit and key col 6 Interesting prominence situations 7 Calculations and mathematics 8 Wet prominence and dry prominence 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 External linksDefinitions[edit]Figure 1. Vertical arrows show the topographic prominence of three peaks on an island. The dashed horizontal lines show the lowest contours that do not encircle higher peaks
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Lough
Loch
Loch
(/lɒx/) is the Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
and Scots word for a lake or for a sea inlet. It is cognate with the Manx lough, Cornish logh, and the Welsh word for lake, llyn. In English English
English English
and Hiberno-English, the anglicised spelling lough (/lɒx/ or /lɒk/) is commonly found in place names; in Lowland Scots and Scottish English, the spelling "loch" is always used. Some lochs could also be called firths, fjords, estuaries, straits or bays. Sea-inlet lochs are often called sea lochs or sea loughs
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Glacier
A glacier (US: /ˈɡleɪʃər/ or UK: /ˈɡlæsiə/) is a persistent body of dense ice that is constantly moving under its own weight; it forms where the accumulation of snow exceeds its ablation (melting and sublimation) over many years, often centuries. Glaciers slowly deform and flow due to stresses induced by their weight, creating crevasses, seracs, and other distinguishing features. They also abrade rock and debris from their substrate to create landforms such as cirques and moraines. Glaciers form only on land and are distinct from the much thinner sea ice and lake ice that form on the surface of bodies of water. On Earth, 99% of glacial ice is contained within vast ice sheets in the polar regions, but glaciers may be found in mountain ranges on every continent including Oceania's high-latitude oceanic islands such as New Zealand
New Zealand
and Papua New Guinea
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Cirque (landform)
A cirque (French, from the Latin word circus) is an amphitheatre-like valley formed by glacial erosion. Alternative names for this landform are corrie (from Scottish Gaelic coire meaning a pot or cauldron) and cwm (Welsh for "valley", pronounced /kʊm/ coom). A cirque may also be a similarly shaped landform arising from fluvial erosion. The concave shape of a glacial cirque is open on the downhill side, while the cupped section is generally steep. Cliff-like slopes, down which ice and glaciated debris combine and converge, form the three or more higher sides. The floor of the cirque ends up bowl-shaped as it is the complex convergence zone of combining ice flows from multiple directions and their accompanying rock burdens: hence it experiences somewhat greater erosion forces, and is most often overdeepened below the level of the cirque's low-side outlet (stage) and its down slope (backstage) valley
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Ice Age
An ice age is a period of long-term reduction in the temperature of Earth's surface and atmosphere, resulting in the presence or expansion of continental and polar ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Within a long-term ice age, individual pulses of cold climate are termed "glacial periods" (or alternatively "glacials" or "glaciations" or colloquially as "ice age"), and intermittent warm periods are called "interglacials". In the terminology of glaciology, ice age implies the presence of extensive ice sheets in both northern and southern hemispheres.[1] By this definition, we are in an interglacial period—the Holocene—of the ice age
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Scottish Mountaineering Club
The Scottish Mountaineering
Mountaineering
Club (SMC) is Scotland's second oldest mountaineering club. (the Cairngorm Club
Cairngorm Club
was founded a few months earlier.) Founded in 1889, in Glasgow, the private club, with about 400 members, publishes guidebooks and runs a list of Munroists.[1][2]Contents1 History 2 Publishing 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] At the time of the club's founding there were a number of experienced Alpinists living in Scotland
Scotland
who had no contact with like-minded mountaineers. A flurry of letters in The Glasgow
Glasgow
Herald led to meetings and the foundation of the club, whose first president was George Gilbert Ramsay. Contrary to later criticism, the club was initially open to women, but as none joined it took on a male-only persona, only changed many decades later following debate and votes within the club
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Munro
A Munro
Munro
( listen (help·info)) is a mountain in Scotland with a height over 3,000 feet (914 m). The best known Munro
Munro
is Ben Nevis, the highest mountain in the British Isles. Munros are named after Sir Hugh Munro, 4th Baronet (1856–1919), who produced the first list of such hills, known as Munro's Tables, in 1891. The publication of the original list is usually considered to be the epoch event of modern peak bagging.[1] The list has been the subject of subsequent variation. The 2012 revision, published by the Scottish Mountaineering Club, has 282 Munros and 227 subsidiary tops. " Munro
Munro
bagging" is the activity of climbing all the listed Munros. They present challenging conditions to walkers, particularly in winter. As of 2017, more than 6,000 people had reported completing a round
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Townland
A townland (Irish: baile fearainn; Ulster-Scots: toonlann[1]) is a small geographical division of land used in Ireland. The townland system is of Gaelic origin, pre-dating the Norman invasion,[2][3][4][5] and most have names of Irish Gaelic origin.[3] However, some townland names and boundaries come from Norman manors, plantation divisions, or later creations of the Ordnance Survey.[6][7] The total number of inhabited townlands was 60,679 in 1911.[8] The total number recognised by the Irish Place Names database as of 2014 was 61,098, including uninhabited townlands, mainly small islands.[9]Contents1 Background1.1 Etymology 1.2 Historical land divisions and etymology 1.3 Size and value 1.4 Historical use 1.5 Irish Ordnance Survey and standardisation 1.6 Current use2 See also 3 Footnotes 4 Sources4.1 References5 Further reading 6 External linksBackground[edit]Map showing the townlands of the Thurles civil parish, County Tipperary
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Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen); Ulster-Scots: Airlann [ˈɑːrlən]) is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain
Great Britain
to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland
Ireland
is the third-largest island in Europe. Politically, Ireland
Ireland
is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. In 2011, the population of Ireland
Ireland
was about 6.6 million, ranking it the second-most populous island in Europe
Europe
after Great Britain
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R639 Road (Ireland)
The R639 road is one of Ireland's regional roads. Once designated the N8 national primary road (and before that some fractions were designated as the T6 and others as the T9), it was reclassified in stages as the R639 following the progressive opening of sections of the M8 motorway, which rendered the single carriageway N8 redundant as a national primary road. By-passed sections of the old N8 were generally reclassified as R639 as soon a new section of M8 opened, thereby increasing the length of the R639
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Ordnance Survey Of Ireland
Ordnance may refer to:Contents1 Places 2 Maps-related 3 Military and defense 4 See alsoPlaces[edit]Ordnance, Oregon, a former community near the Umatilla Chemical Depot Ordnance Island, Bermuda, formerly a Royal Army Ordnance Corps depot, in St
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