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Gallo-Roman
The term Gallo-Roman
Gallo-Roman
describes the Romanized culture of Gaul
Gaul
under the rule of the Roman Empire
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Postumus
Year of the Six Emperors (238)Gordian Revolt (238) Aquileia (238) Reign of Pupienus
Pupienus
and Balbinus (238) Invasion of the Carpi (238–239)Reign of Gordian III (238–244)Sabinianus Revolt (240) Resaena (243) Misiche (244)Reign of Philip the Arab (244–249)Invasion of the Carpi (245–247) Secular Games of 248 (248) Usurpation of Sponsianus (240s) Usurpation of Pacatianus (248) Usurpation of Jotapianus (249) Usurpation of Silbannacus (249 or 253) Decius' Rebellion (249)


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Roman Citizenship
Citizenship in ancient Rome
Rome
(Latin: civitas) was a privileged political and legal status afforded to free individuals with respect to laws, property, and governance.A male Roman citizen enjoyed a wide range of privileges and protections defined in detail by the Roman state. A citizen could, under certain exceptional circumstances, be deprived of his citizenship. Roman women had a limited form of citizenship. Though held in high regard they were not allowed to vote or stand for civil or public office. The rich might participate in public life by funding building projects or sponsoring religious ceremonies and other events. Women had the right to own property, to engage in business, and to obtain a divorce, but their legal rights varied over time
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Loire
The Loire
Loire
(French pronunciation: ​[lwaʁ]; Occitan: Léger; Breton: Liger) is the longest river in France
France
and the 171st longest in the world.[3] With a length of 1,012 kilometres (629 mi), it drains an area of 117,054 km2 (45,195 sq mi), or more than a fifth of France's land area,[1] while its average discharge is only half that of the Rhône. It rises in the highlands of the southeastern quarter of the Massif Central in the Cévennes
Cévennes
range (in the department of Ardèche) at 1,350 m (4,430 ft) near Mont Gerbier de Jonc; it flows north through Nevers
Nevers
to Orléans, then west through Tours
Tours
and Nantes
Nantes
until it reaches the Bay of Biscay
Bay of Biscay
(Atlantic Ocean) at Saint-Nazaire
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Tours
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Tours
Tours
(French pronunciation: ​[tuʁ]) is a city located in the centre-west of France. It is the administrative centre of the Indre-et-Loire
Indre-et-Loire
department and the largest city in the Centre-Val de Loire
Loire
region of France
France
(although it is not the capital, which is the region's second-largest city, Orléans). In 2012, the city of Tours had 134,978 inhabitants, while the population of the whole metropolitan area was 483,744. Tours
Tours
stands on the lower reaches of the Loire
Loire
river, between Orléans and the Atlantic coast
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Gallic Empire
Gallic Roman EmpireImperium Galliarum[note 1]260–274The Gallic Empire
Gallic Empire
under Tetricus I
Tetricus I
by 271 A.D
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Solidus (coin)
The solidus ( Latin
Latin
for "solid"; pl. solidi), nomisma (Greek: νόμισμα, nómisma, lit. "coin"), or bezant was originally a relatively pure gold coin issued in the Late Roman Empire. Under Constantine, who introduced it on a wide scale, it had a weight of about 4.5 grams. It was largely replaced in Western Europe by Pepin the Short's currency reform, which introduced the silver-based pound/shilling/penny system, under which the shilling (Latin: solidus) functioned as a unit of account equivalent to 12 pence, eventually developing into the French sou. In Eastern Europe, the nomisma was gradually debased by the Byzantine emperors until it was abolished by Alexius I
Alexius I
in 1092, who replaced it with the hyperpyron, which also came to be known as a "bezant"
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Hotel De La Monnaie
The Monnaie de Paris
Paris
( Paris
Paris
Mint) is a government owned institution responsible for producing France's euro coins. Founded in 864 AD, it is the world's oldest continuously running minting institution operating from two sites, one in Paris
Paris
and one in Pessac. Administratively speaking, the "Direction of Coins and Medals", the national mint is an administration of the French government
French government
charged with issuing coins as well as producing medals and other similar items. Many ancient coins are housed in the collections maintained there
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Diocletian
Diocletian
Diocletian
(/ˌdaɪ.əˈkliːʃən/; Latin: Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus Augustus), born Diocles (244–312),[3][5] was a Roman emperor from 284 to 305. Born to a family of low status in Dalmatia, Diocletian
Diocletian
rose through the ranks of the military to become Roman cavalry commander to the Emperor Carus. After the deaths of Carus
Carus
and his son Numerian
Numerian
on campaign in Persia, Diocletian
Diocletian
was proclaimed emperor. The title was also claimed by Carus' other surviving son, Carinus, but Diocletian
Diocletian
defeated him in the Battle of the Margus. Diocletian's reign stabilized the empire and marks the end of the Crisis of the Third Century. He appointed fellow officer Maximian
Maximian
as Augustus, co-emperor, in 286
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Constitutio Antoniniana
The Constitutio Antoniniana ( Latin
Latin
for: "Constitution [or Edict] of Antoninus") (also called the Edict of Caracalla
Caracalla
or the Antonine Constitution) was an edict issued in 212,[1] by the Roman Emperor Caracalla
Caracalla
declaring that all free men in the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
were to be given theoretical Roman citizenship and that all free women in the Empire were to be given the same rights as Roman women. Before 212, for the most part only inhabitants of Italy held full Roman citizenship
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Visigoths
The Visigoths
Visigoths
(UK: /ˈvɪzɪˌɡɒθs/; US: /ˈvɪzɪˌɡɑːθs/; Latin: Visigothi, Wisigothi, Vesi, Visi, Wesi, Wisi; Italian: Visigoti) were the western branches of the nomadic tribes of Germanic peoples referred to collectively as the Goths.[2] These tribes flourished and spread throughout the late Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in Late Antiquity, or what is known as the Migration Period
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Lorica Hamata
The lorica hamata is a type of mail armour used by soldiers of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and the Roman Empire. It was issued to both primary legionary and secondary auxilia troops and was mostly manufactured out of bronze[1] or iron. It comprised alternating rows of closed washer-like rings punched from iron sheets and rows of riveted rings made from drawn wire that ran horizontally, producing very flexible, reliable and strong armour. Each ring had an inside diameter of about 5 mm, and an outside diameter of about 7 mm.[citation needed] The Romans' knowledge of mail manufacture may have come from third century BC conflicts with the Celts,[2] though the first documented use occurred during the Roman conquest of Hispania
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Chainmail
[1] "Chain mail" redirects here. For other uses, see Chain mail (other). "Maille" redirects here. For other uses, see Maille (other).Riveted mail and plate coat zirah bagtar. Armour
Armour
of this type was introduced into India under the Mughals.Mail or maille (also chain mail(le)[2] or chainmail(le)) is a type of armour consisting of small metal rings linked together in a pattern to form a mesh
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Classical Art
Ancient Greek art
Greek art
stands out among that of other ancient cultures for its development of naturalistic but idealized depictions of the human body, in which largely nude male figures were generally the focus of innovation. The rate of stylistic development between about 750 and 300 BC was remarkable by ancient standards, and in surviving works is best seen in sculpture. There were important innovations in painting, which have to be essentially reconstructed due to the lack of original survivals of quality, other than the distinct field of painted pottery. Greek architecture, technically very simple, established a harmonious style with numerous detailed conventions that were largely adopted by Roman architecture
Roman architecture
and are still followed in some modern buildings
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Roman Art
Roman art
Roman art
refers to the visual arts made in Ancient Rome
Ancient Rome
and in the territories of the Roman Empire. Roman art
Roman art
includes architecture, painting, sculpture and mosaic work. Luxury objects in metal-work, gem engraving, ivory carvings, and glass are sometimes considered in modern terms to be minor forms of Roman art,[1] although this would not necessarily have been the case for contemporaries. Sculpture was perhaps considered as the highest form of art by Romans, but figure painting was also very highly regarded
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Celtic Art
Celtic art
Celtic art
is associated with the peoples known as Celts; those who spoke the Celtic languages
Celtic languages
in Europe
Europe
from pre-history through to the modern period, as well as the art of ancient peoples whose language is uncertain, but have cultural and stylistic similarities with speakers of Celtic languages. Celtic art
Celtic art
is a difficult term to define, covering a huge expanse of time, geography and cultures
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