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Galesburg, Illinois
Galesburg is a city in Knox County, Illinois, United States. This city is forty-five miles northwest of Peoria. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 32,195
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Automobile
A car (or automobile) is a wheeled motor vehicle used for transportation. Most definitions of car say they run primarily on roads, seat one to eight people, have four tires, and mainly transport people rather than goods.[2][3] Cars came into global use during the 20th century, and developed economies depend on them. The year 1886 is regarded as the birth year of the modern car when German inventor Karl Benz built his Benz Patent-Motorwagen. Cars became widely available in the early 20th century. One of the first cars that were accessible to the masses was the 1908 Model T, an American car manufactured by the Ford
Ford
Motor Company. Cars were rapidly adopted in the US, where they replaced animal-drawn carriages and carts, but took much longer to be accepted in Western Europe and other parts of the world. Cars have controls for driving, parking, passenger comfort and safety, and controlling a variety of lights
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Railroad
Rail transport
Rail transport
is a means of transferring of passengers and goods on wheeled vehicles running on rails, also known as tracks. It is also commonly referred to as train transport. In contrast to road transport, where vehicles run on a prepared flat surface, rail vehicles (rolling stock) are directionally guided by the tracks on which they run. Tracks usually consist of steel rails, installed on ties (sleepers) and ballast, on which the rolling stock, usually fitted with metal wheels, moves
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Underground Railroad
The Underground Railroad
Underground Railroad
was a network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States
United States
during the early to mid-19th century, and used by African-American slaves to escape into free states a
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Mary Ann Bickerdyke
Mary
Mary
may refer to: Mary
Mary
(name), a female given nameContents1 People1.1 Religious contexts 1.2 Royalty2 Geography 3 Books 4 Film and television 5 Music5.1 Albums 5.2 Songs6 Ships and boats 7 Other uses 8 See alsoPeople This section lists people commonly referred to
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American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
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Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) is a professional baseball organization, the oldest of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. A total of 30 teams play in the National League (NL) and American League
American League
(AL), with 15 teams in each league. The NL and AL were formed as separate legal entities in 1876 and 1901 respectively. After cooperating but remaining legally separate entities beginning in 1903, the leagues merged into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball
Baseball
in 2000.[6] The organization also oversees Minor League Baseball, which comprises about 240 teams affiliated with the Major League clubs
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Illinois Historic Preservation Agency
The Illinois Historic Preservation Division, formerly Illinois Historic Preservation Agency, is a governmental agency of the U.S. state of Illinois, and is a division of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. It is tasked with the duty of maintaining State-owned historic sites, and maximizing their educational and recreational value to visitors or on-line users. In addition, it manages the process for applications within the state for additions to the National Register of Historic Places.Contents1 History of agency 2 List of Illinois State Historic Sites 3 References 4 External linksHistory of agency[edit] The Illinois Historic Preservation Agency (IHPA) was created by State law in July 1985. The agency's oldest bureau, the Illinois State Historical Library, was created in 1889, but the origins of the agency could be said to date back to the creation of Lincoln's Tomb for the burial of U.S
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Burlington, Iowa
Burlington is a city and the county seat of Des Moines County, Iowa, United States.[4] The population was 25,663 in the 2010 census, a decline from the 26,839 population in the 2000 census.[5][6] Burlington is the center of a micropolitan area including West Burlington, Iowa, and Middletown, Iowa, and Gulfport, Illinois. Burlington is the home of Snake Alley, once labelled the crookedest alley in the world.Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Climate3 Demographics3.1 2010 census 3.2 2000 census4 Economy4.1 Downtown Burlington5 Sports 6 Education 7 Media 8 Transportation 9 Notable people 10 Sister cities 11 Notes 12 See also 13 References 14 External linksHistory[edit] Prior to European settlement, the area was neutral territory for the Sac and Fox Indians, who called it Shoquoquon (Shok-ko-kon), meaning Flint Hills.[7] In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
organized two parties of explorers to map the Louisiana Purchase
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National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
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Chicago, Burlington And Quincy Railroad
The Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad
Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad
(reporting mark CBQ) was a railroad that operated in the Midwestern United States. Commonly referred to as the Burlington or as the Q,[1][2] the Burlington Route served a large area, including extensive trackage in the states of Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Wyoming, and also in New Mexico
New Mexico
and Texas
Texas
through subsidiaries Colorado
Colorado
and Southern Railway, Fort Worth and Denver Railway, and Burlington-Rock Island Railroad.[citation needed] Its primary connections included Chicago, Minneapolis-St. Paul, St. Louis, Kansas
Kansas
City and Denver. Because of this extensive trackage in the midwest and mountain states, the railroad used the advertising slogans "Everywhere West", "Way of the Zephyrs", and "The Way West"
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Hump Yard
A classification yard (American and Canadian English) or marshalling yard (British, Hong Kong, Indian, Australian and Canadian English) is a railway yard found at some freight train stations, used to separate railway cars onto one of several tracks. First the cars are taken to a track, sometimes called a lead or a drill. From there the cars are sent through a series of switches called a ladder onto the classification tracks. Larger yards tend to put the lead on an artificially built hill called a hump to use the force of gravity to propel the cars through the ladder. Freight trains that consist of isolated cars must be made into trains and divided according to their destinations. Thus the cars must be shunted several times along their route in contrast to a unit train, which carries, for example, cars from the plant to a port, or coal from a mine to the power plant
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Galesburg (Amtrak Station)
Galesburg is an Amtrak intercity train station in Galesburg, Illinois, United States. The station was originally built in 1984, after the razing of the large depot just south of the current site. It is located north of the large BNSF Classification yard. Just south the Illinois Zephyr (route 380/383) and Carl Sandburg (route 381/382) diverge via the Quincy main line which bypasses the yard on the east side. The California Zephyr (route 5/6) and the Southwest Chief (3/4) continue to the southwest side of Galesburg near Knox College. There are three tracks with one island platform and one side platform. Trains to California normally arrive on the track closest to the depot, known as track one
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Atchison, Topeka And Santa Fe Railway
The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway
Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway
(reporting mark ATSF), often referred to as the Santa Fe or AT&SF, was one of the larger railroads in the United States. Chartered in February 1859, the railroad reached the Kansas- Colorado
Colorado
border in 1873 and Pueblo, Colorado, in 1876. To create a demand for its services, the railroad set up real estate offices and sold farm land from the land grants that it was awarded by Congress. Despite the name, its main line never served Santa Fe, New Mexico, as the terrain was too difficult; the town ultimately was reached by a branch line from Lamy. The Santa Fe was a pioneer in intermodal freight transport, an enterprise that (at one time or another) included a tugboat fleet and an airline (the short-lived Santa Fe Skyway)
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Amtrak
The National Railroad Passenger Corporation, doing business as Amtrak /ˈæmtræk/, is a passenger railroad service that provides medium- and long-distance intercity service in the contiguous United States and to three Canadian cities. Founded 47 years ago in 1971 as a quasi-public corporation to operate many U.S. passenger rail services,[1][2][3] it receives a combination of state and federal subsidies but is managed as a for-profit organization.[4] Amtrak's headquarters is located in Union Station in Washington, D.C.[5] Amtrak
Amtrak
serves more than 500 destinations in 46 states and three Canadian provinces, operating more than 300 trains daily over 21,300 miles (34,000 km) of track. Some track sections allow trains to run as fast as 150 mph (240 km/h).[6] In fiscal year 2016, Amtrak
Amtrak
served 31.3 million passengers and had $2.192 billion in revenue, while employing more than 20,000 people
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