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Gaelic Nobility Of Ireland
This article concerns the Gaelic nobility of Ireland from ancient to modern times. It only partly overlaps with Chiefs of the Name because it excludes Scotland
Scotland
and other discussion. It is one of three groups of Irish nobility, the others being those nobles descended from the Hiberno-Normans
Hiberno-Normans
and those granted titles of nobility in the Peerage of Ireland.Contents1 Legal status 2 Nobles2.1 O'Neill claimants 2.2 O'Donnell succession3 Other Gaelic nobles3.1 MacCarthys Mór 3.2 Remaining agnates 3.3 Other4 See also 5 Notes 6 References6.1 Genealogical and historical 6.2 Irish kingship and lordship 6.3 OtherLegal status[edit] By the time of the Treaty of Limerick, almost all Gaelic nobles had lost any semblance of real power in their (former) domains
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O'Kennedy
The O'Kennedy family (Irish: Ó Cinnéide), sometimes simply Kennedy, were an Irish royal dynasty, a sept of the Dál gCais, founded in the Middle Ages who were Kings of Ormond. Their founder was the nephew of High King Brian Boru (1002–1014). The name Cinnéide belonged to Brian Boru's father Cennétig mac Lorcáin, King of Thomond, in the tenth century AD.[1] (Brian Boru was an Ard Rí or High King of Ireland). The Kennedys did not descend directly from Brian Boru, but from Cinnéide's eldest son Donncuan. Donncuan's son Mahon was the first to call himself Ó Cinnéide which is Irish for grandson of Cinnéide. Placenames such as Killokennedy in Thomond are indicative of their longstanding presence in the region.Contents1 History 2 Castles 3 Arms 4 References4.1 Bibliography5 External linksHistory[edit] The Kennedys belonged to the powerful Dál gCais people of Thomond, headed by the O'Briens
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Fitzpatrick (surname)
The surname Fitzpatrick is the known translation of at least two different surnames: Mac Giolla Phádraig and Ó Maol Phádraig from the original Irish to English.[1] Currently, it is ranked as the 60th most common surname in Ireland with an estimated 12,700 individuals bearing the name.[2] While both Mac Giolla Phádraig and Ó Maol Phádraig have similar meanings, they are likely unrelated; yet both have arrived in the modern era as Fitzpatrick. Despite the prefix "Fitz-", Fitzpatrick is not a name of Hiberno-Norman
Hiberno-Norman
descent.[3][4]Contents1 History and origins 2 Notable Fitzpatricks 3 Armorial bearings and mottoes 4 Modern research 5 See also 6 Notes 7 External linksHistory and origins[edit] Main article: Mac Giolla Phádraig Giolla Phádraig (means "the devotee of Patrick")
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Kings Of Uí Maine
Uí Maine
Uí Maine
was the name of a kingdom situated in south Connacht, consisting of all of County Galway
County Galway
east of Athenry, all of southern and central County Roscommon. In prehistory it was believed to have spanned the River Shannon, and in the 8th century even briefly extended its dominion west to Galway Bay. It existed as an independent kingdom from prehistoric times, and as a subject kingdom up to the end of the medieval era. The acknowledged senior branch of the Ó Ceallaigh (O'Kelly) Uí Maine is the O'Kelly de Gallagh and Tycooly (see Irish nobility and Chief of the Name), and are Counts of the Holy Roman Empire
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Tethbae
Tethbae (pronounced [ˈteθve]; also spelled Tethba, often anglicised Teffia)[n 1] was a confederation of túaithe in central Ireland in the Middle Ages. It was divided into two distinct kingdoms, north Tethba, ruled by the Cenél Coirpri, and south Tethba, ruled by the Cenél Maini. It covered parts of County Westmeath and much of County Longford, counties which today are the far north-west part of the province of Leinster. In some cases Tethbae may refer to south Tethbae only.Contents1 Two Tethbae 2 Cenél Coirpri 3 Cenél Maini 4 References and notes4.1 Notes 4.2 Citations5 ReferencesTwo Tethbae[edit] In Early Christian times, Tethba lay within the lands of the southern Uí Néill and the ruling dynasties of both kingdoms were reckoned members of the Uí Néill kindred in medieval genealogies
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Abeyance
Abeyance (from the Old French
Old French
abeance meaning "gaping") is a state of expectancy in respect of property, titles or office, when the right to them is not vested in any one person, but awaits the appearance or determination of the true owner. In law, the term abeyance can only be applied to such future estates as have not yet vested or possibly may not vest. For example, an estate is granted to A for life, with remainder to the heir of B
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Ard Rí
The High Kings of Ireland (Irish: Ard-Rí na hÉireann Irish pronunciation: [ˈa:ɾˠd̪ˠˌɾˠiː n̪ˠə ˈheːrʲən̪ˠ]) were sometimes historical and sometimes legendary figures who had, or who are claimed to have had, lordship over the whole of Ireland. Medieval and early modern Irish literature portrays an almost unbroken sequence of High Kings, ruling from the Hill of Tara over a hierarchy of lesser kings, stretching back thousands of years
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Dál Birn
Dál Birn ("portion" of Birn) is a tribal epithet found in Irish sources which refers to the descendants of Loegaire Birn Buadach, the hereditary ruling lineage of the kingdom of Osraige in Ireland.[1][2]Contents1 Lineage 2 Sources 3 Dál Birn descendants3.1 Lineages 3.2 Individuals4 References 5 External linksLineage[edit] This illustrious lineage produced Osraige's native kings and lords- all claimed to be commonly descended on the paternal line from the second-century king Loegaire Birn Buadach (Loegaire Birn "the Victorious"), son of Óengus Osrithe and gave rise to a number of related individuals and later, clans which remained intact and identifiable into the modern era
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Kings Of Osraige
The kings of Osraige
Osraige
(alternately spelled Osraighe and Anglicised as Ossory) reigned over the medieval Irish kingdom of Osraige
Osraige
from the first or second century AD until the late twelfth century. Osraige
Osraige
was a semi-provincial kingdom in south-east Ireland
Ireland
which disappeared following the Norman Invasion of Ireland. Except for a period in the sixth century, the kingdom was ruled continuously by a single dynasty which is known to history by several names: Dál Birn being the first general term for the native ruling lineage of Osraige, and later adopting the surname Mac Giolla Phádraig by the end of the tenth century. This same dynasty eventually outlived the collapse of the kingdom into a lordship, and remarkably continued into the first half of the 20th century as landed gentry of varying rank
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Tanistry
Tanistry
Tanistry
is a Gaelic system for passing on titles and lands. In this system the Tanist (Irish: Tánaiste; Scottish Gaelic: Tànaiste; Manx: Tanishtey) is the office of heir-apparent, or second-in-command, among the (royal) Gaelic patrilineal dynasties of Ireland, Scotland
Scotland
and Man, to succeed to the chieftainship or to the kingship.Contents1 Origins 2 Candidates and functions 3 Further points 4 Current political uses 5 Uses in literature and popular culture 6 Blood tanistry 7 See also 8 References 9 Sources 10 External linksOrigins[edit] Historically the Tanist was chosen from among the heads of the roydammna or "righdamhna" (literally, those of kingly material) or, alternatively, among all males of the sept, and elected by them in full assembly. The eligibility was based on patrilineal relationship, which meant the electing body and the eligibles were agnates with each other
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Mac Giolla Phádraig
Mac
Mac
or MAC may refer to:Contents1 Common meanings 2 Arts, entertainment, and media2.1 Fictional entities 2.2 Other uses in arts, entertainment, and media3 Business and economics 4 Businesses and organizations4.1 Businesses 4.2 Government and military agencies 4.3 Non-profit organizations 4.4 Political groups 4.5 Schools 4.6 Sports organizations4.6.1 Clubs and teams 4.6.2 Conferences5 People5.1 Names 5.2 People with the nickname or professional name6 Places6.1 Inhabited places 6.2 Museums and arts centers 6.3 Other facilities7 Science a
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Terence Francis MacCarthy
Terence Francis MacCarthy (born 21 January 1957), formerly self-styled Tadhg V, The MacCarthy Mór, Prince of Desmond and Lord of Kerslawny, is a genealogist, historian, and writer. Born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, he is a resident of Morocco. His last name is sometimes published as McCarthy. In 1992 MacCarthy gained Chief of the Name recognition as the MacCarthy Mór. He worked to organise an affiliation of clan associations in Ireland and North America, building on heritage tourism. He also became active in the International Commission on Orders of Chivalry (ICOC), in which position he promoted an order known as the Niadh Nask. His claims were challenged in 1999 by The Sunday Times, which had conducted an investigation of his ancestry and claimed his father was an ordinary working man in Belfast. Later that year, recognition of MacCarthy was withdrawn and he resigned the title
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Constitution Of Ireland
The Constitution
Constitution
of Ireland
Ireland
(Irish: Bunreacht na hÉireann, pronounced [ˈbˠɔnrʲaxt̪ˠ n̪ˠə ˈheːrʲən̪ˠ]) is the fundamental law of the Republic of Ireland. It asserts the national sovereignty of the Irish people. The constitution falls broadly within the tradition of liberal democracy being based on a system of representative democracy. It guarantees certain fundamental rights, along with a popularly elected non-executive president, a bicameral parliament based on the Westminster system, a separation of powers and judicial review. It is the second constitution of the Irish state since independence, replacing the 1922 Constitution
Constitution
of the Irish Free State.[1] It came into force on 29 December 1937 following a statewide plebiscite held on 1 July 1937
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Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
Ireland
(Irish: Tuaisceart Éireann [ˈt̪ˠuəʃcəɾˠt̪ˠ ˈeːɾʲən̪ˠ] ( listen);[8] Ulster-Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in the north-east of the island of Ireland,[9][10] variously described as a country, province or region.[11][12][13] Northern Ireland
Ireland
shares a border to the south and west with the Republic of Ireland. In 2011, its population was 1,810,863,[4] constituting about 30% of the island's total population and about 3% of the UK's population
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Republic Of Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen)), also known as the Republic of Ireland
Ireland
(Poblacht na hÉireann), is a sovereign state in north-western Europe
Europe
occupying 26 of 32 counties of the island of Ireland. The capital and largest city is Dublin, which is located on the eastern part of the island, and whose metropolitan area is home to around a third of the country's 4.75 million inhabitants. The state shares its only land border with Northern Ireland, a part of the United Kingdom. It is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the Celtic Sea to the south, Saint George's Channel
Saint George's Channel
to the south-east, and the Irish Sea to the east
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Treaty Of Limerick
The Treaty of Limerick (Irish: Conradh Luimnigh) ended the Williamite War in Ireland between the Jacobites and the supporters of William of Orange and concluded the Siege of Limerick. The treaty really consisted of two treaties, both of which were signed on 3 October 1691
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