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Gackt
Gakuto Oshiro (大城 ガクト, Ōshiro Gakuto, born July 4, 1973),[nb 1][8] better known by his mononymous stage name Gackt, is a Japanese musician, singer, songwriter, record producer and actor. He has been active since 1993, first as the frontman of the short-lived independent band Cains:Feel, and then for the now defunct visual kei rock band Malice Mizer, before starting his solo career in 1999
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Tokyo International Film Festival
35°42′2″N 139°42′54″E / 35.70056°N 139.71500°E / 35.70056; 139.71500 Tokyo
Tokyo
International Film FestivalLocation Tokyo, JapanLanguage InternationalWebsite www.tiff-jp.netThe Tokyo
Tokyo
International Film Festival (東京国際映画祭, Tōkyōkokusaieigasai) (TIFF) is a film festival established in 1985. The event was held biennially from 1985 to 1991 and annually thereafter. Along with the Shanghai International Film Festival, it is one of Asia's competitive film festivals, and the only Japanese festival accredited by the FIAPF.[1][2] The awards handed out during the festival have changed throughout its existence, but the Tokyo
Tokyo
Sakura Grand Prix, handed to the best film, has stayed as the top award
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Kyoto Gakuen University
Kyoto
Kyoto
Gakuen University (京都学園大学, Kyoto
Kyoto
gakuen daigaku) is a private university in Kameoka, Kyoto, Japan. The school's predecessor was founded in 1925, and it was chartered as a university in 1969
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Music Teacher
Music
Music
education is a field of study associated with the teaching and learning of music. It touches on all learning domains, including the psychomotor domain (the development of skills), the cognitive domain (the acquisition of knowledge), and, in particular and significant ways, the affective domain (the learner's willingness to receive, internalize, and share what is learned), including music appreciation and sensitivity. Music
Music
training from preschool through post-secondary education is common in most nations because involvement with music is considered a fundamental component of human culture and behavior. Cultures from around the world have different approaches to music education, largely due to the varying histories and politics
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Trumpet
BrassWind Brass Aerophone Hornbostel–Sachs classification 423.233 (Valved aerophone sounded by lip movement)Playing rangeWritten range:Related instrumentsFlugelhorn, cornet, cornett, Flumpet, bugle, natural trumpet, bass trumpet, post horn, Roman tuba, buccina, cornu, lituus, shofar, dord, dung chen, sringa, shankha, lur, didgeridoo, Alphorn, Russian horns, serpent, ophicleide, piccolo trumpet, horn, alto horn, baritone horn, pocket trumpetPart of a series onMusical instrumentsWoodwindsPiccolo Flute Oboe Cor anglais Clarinet Saxophone Bassoon Contrabassoon Bagpipes RecorderGarklein in C6 (c‴) Sopranino in F5 (f″) Soprano in C5 (c″) Alto in F4 (f′)
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Teacher
A teacher (also called a school teacher or, in some contexts, an educator) is a person who helps others to acquire knowledge, competences or values. Informally the role of teacher may be taken on by anyone (e.g. when showing a colleague how to perform a specific task). In some countries, teaching young people of school age may be carried out in an informal setting, such as within the family (homeschooling), rather than in a formal setting such as a school or college. Some other professions may involve a significant amount of teaching (e.g. youth worker, pastor). In most countries, formal teaching of students is usually carried out by paid professional teachers
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Yamaguchi, Yamaguchi
Yamaguchi (山口市, Yamaguchi-shi) is the capital city of Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan. The city was founded on April 10, 1929. As of February 1, 2010, the city had an estimated population of 198,971 and a population density of 194.44 persons per km²
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Fukuoka
Fukuoka
Fukuoka
(福岡市, Fukuoka-shi, Japanese: [ɸɯ̥kɯꜜoka]) is the capital city of Fukuoka
Fukuoka
Prefecture, situated on the northern shore of Japanese island Kyushu. It is the most populous city on the island, followed by Kitakyushu. It is the largest city and metropolitan area west of Keihanshin. The city was designated on April 1, 1972, by government ordinance. Greater Fukuoka, with a population of 2.5 million people (2005 census), is part of the heavily industrialized Fukuoka– Kitakyushu
Kitakyushu
zone as well as Northern Kyushu. As of 2015[update], Fukuoka
Fukuoka
is Japan’s sixth largest city, having passed the population of Kobe.[1] As of July 2011[update], Fukuoka
Fukuoka
passed the population of Kyoto
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Shiga, Shiga
Shiga (志賀町, Shiga-chō) was a town located in Shiga District, Shiga Prefecture, Japan. It is on the western shore of Lake Biwa
Lake Biwa
and the eastern foot of Hira Mountains. As of 2003, the town had an estimated population of 21,964 and a density of 306.20 persons per km². The total area was 71.73 km². On March 20, 2006, Shiga was merged into the expanded city of Ōtsu. The original village called Shiga (kanji was "滋賀", not 志賀) was located slightly north of Ōtsu, and merged with Ōtsu on May 10, 1932. A new town called Shiga was established on October 1, 1955 upon the mergers of Wani (和邇), Kido (木戸), and Komatsu (小松) villages, further north of Ōtsu.Authority controlNDL: 00338985This Shiga Prefecture
Shiga Prefecture
location article is a stub
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Osaka
Osaka
Osaka
(大阪市, Ōsaka-shi) (Japanese pronunciation: [oːsaka];  listen (help·info)) is a designated city in the Kansai region of Japan. It is the capital city of Osaka Prefecture
Osaka Prefecture
and the largest component of the Keihanshin
Keihanshin
Metropolitan Area, the second largest metropolitan area in Japan
Japan
and among the largest in the world with over 19 million inhabitants
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Kyoto
Kyoto
Kyoto
(京都市, Kyōto-shi, pronounced [kʲoːꜜto] ( listen), pronounced [kʲoːtoꜜɕi] ( listen); UK: /kɪˈoʊtoʊ/, US: /kiˈoʊ-/, or /ˈkjoʊ-/[4]) is a city located in the central part of the island of Honshu, Japan. It has a population close to 1.5 million
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Elementary Schools In Japan
Elementary school (小学校, Shōgakkō) in Japan is compulsory.[1] All children begin first grade in the April after they turn six[1]--kindergarten is growing increasingly popular, but is not mandatory—and starting school is considered a very important event in a child's life.Contents1 History 2 Courses of Study 3 Daily life3.1 Lunch 3.2 Afternoons4 Problems4.1 Controversies5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] In the Edo period, some children attended terakoya or temple schools where they learned practical methods of reading, writing, and calculation. In 1886, the modern elementary school system started as compulsory education. Until 1947, only elementary schools were compulsory. Immediately before and during World War II, state education was used as a propaganda tool by the Japanese fascist government. Today virtually all elementary education takes place in public schools
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Theatre
Theatre
Theatre
or theater[1] is a collaborative form of fine art that uses live performers, typically actors or actresses, to present the experience of a real or imagined event before a live audience in a specific place, often a stage. The performers may communicate this experience to the audience through combinations of gesture, speech, song, music, and dance
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Brass Instruments
A brass instrument is a musical instrument that produces sound by sympathetic vibration of air in a tubular resonator in sympathy with the vibration of the player's lips. Brass
Brass
instruments are also called labrosones, literally meaning "lip-vibrated instruments".[1] There are several factors involved in producing different pitches on a brass instrument. Slides, valves, crooks (though they are rarely used today), or keys are used to change vibratory length of tubing, thus changing the available harmonic series, while the player's embouchure, lip tension and air flow serve to select the specific harmonic produced from the available series. The view of most scholars (see organology) is that the term "brass instrument" should be defined by the way the sound is made, as above, and not by whether the instrument is actually made of brass
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Frédéric Chopin
Frédéric François Chopin
Chopin
(/ˈʃoʊpæ̃/; French: [fʁedeʁik fʁɑ̃swa ʃɔpɛ̃]; 1 March 1810 – 17 October 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of the Romantic era who wrote primarily for solo piano. He has maintained worldwide renown as a leading musician of his era, one whose "poetic genius was based on a professional technique that was without equal in his generation."[1] Chopin
Chopin
was born Fryderyk Franciszek Chopin[n 1] in the Duchy of Warsaw and grew up in Warsaw, which in 1815 became part of Congress Poland. A child prodigy, he completed his musical education and composed his earlier works in Warsaw
Warsaw
before leaving Poland
Poland
at the age of 20, less than a month before the outbreak of the November 1830 Uprising. At 21, he settled in Paris
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Classical Music
Classical music
Classical music
is art music produced or rooted in the traditions of Western culture, including both liturgical (religious) and secular music. While a more precise term is also used to refer to the period from 1750 to 1820 (the Classical period), this article is about the broad span of time from before the 6th century AD to the present day, which includes the Classical period and various other periods.[1] The central norms of this tradition became codified between 1550 and 1900, which is known as the common-practice period
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