HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Fuzztone
Distortion
Distortion
and overdrive are forms of audio signal processing used to alter the sound of amplified electric musical instruments, usually by increasing their gain, producing a "fuzzy", "growling", or "gritty" tone. Distortion
Distortion
is most commonly used with the electric guitar, but may also be used with other electric instruments such as bass guitar, electric piano, and Hammond organ. Guitarists playing electric blues originally obtained an overdriven sound by turning up their vacuum tube-powered guitar amplifiers to high volumes, which caused the signal to get distorted. While overdriven tube amps are still used to obtain overdrive in the 2010s, especially in genres like blues and rockabilly, a number of other ways to produce distortion have been developed since the 1960s, such as distortion effect pedals
[...More...]

"Fuzztone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Fuzzbox (other)
A fuzzbox is a device for deliberately introducing distortion in music. Fuzzbox may also refer to: We've Got a Fuzzbox and We're Gonna Use It
We've Got a Fuzzbox and We're Gonna Use It
or Fuzzbox, a 1980s English pop-punk quartet FuzzBox, a video-game developer that developed Cyber OrgThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Fuzzbox. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
[...More...]

"Fuzzbox (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Electric Blues
Electric blues
Electric blues
refers to any type of blues music distinguished by the use of electric amplification for musical instruments. The guitar was the first instrument to be popularly amplified and used by early pioneers T-Bone Walker
T-Bone Walker
in the late 1930s and John Lee Hooker
John Lee Hooker
and Muddy Waters in the 1940s. Their styles developed into West Coast blues, Detroit
Detroit
blues, and post- World War II
World War II
Chicago
Chicago
blues, which differed from earlier, predominantly acoustic-style blues. By the early 1950s, Little Walter
Little Walter
was a featured soloist on blues harmonica or blues harp using a small hand-held microphone fed into a guitar amplifier. Although it took a little longer, the electric bass guitar gradually replaced the stand-up bass by the early 1960s
[...More...]

"Electric Blues" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Electric Bass
The bass guitar[1] (also known as electric bass,[2][3][4] or bass) is a stringed instrument similar in appearance and construction to an electric guitar, but with a longer neck and scale length, and four to six strings or courses. The four-string bass is usually tuned the same as the double bass,[5] which corresponds to pitches one octave lower than the four lowest pitched strings of a guitar (E, A, D, and G).[6] The bass guitar is a transposing instrument, as it is notated in bass clef an octave higher than it sounds. It is played primarily with the fingers or thumb, by plucking, slapping, popping, strumming, tapping, thumping, or picking with a plectrum, often known as a pick
[...More...]

"Electric Bass" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fuzz Bass
Fuzz bass, also called "bass overdrive" or "bass distortion", is a style of playing the electric bass or modifying its signal that produces a buzzy, distorted, overdriven sound, which the name implies in an onomatopoetic fashion. Overdriving a bass signal significantly changes the timbre, adds higher overtones (harmonics), increases the sustain, and, if the gain is turned up high enough, creates a "breaking up" sound characterized by a growling, buzzy tone. One of the earliest examples may be the 1961 Marty Robbins
Marty Robbins
Country and Western song "Don't Worry."[1] By the mid- to late-1960s, a number of bands began to list "fuzz bass" in addition to "electric bass" on their album credits. Two well-known examples are the Beatles' 1965 song "Think for Yourself" (from Rubber Soul), which marked the first instance of a bass guitar being recorded through a distortion unit,[2] and the 1966 Rolling Stones
Rolling Stones
song "Under My Thumb"
[...More...]

"Fuzz Bass" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Electronic Keyboard
An electronic keyboard or digital keyboard is an electronic musical instrument, an electronic or digital derivative of keyboard instruments.[1] Broadly speaking, the term electronic keyboard or just a keyboard can refer to any type of digital or electronic keyboard instrument. These include synthesizers, digital pianos, stage pianos, electronic organs and digital audio workstations. However, an electronic keyboard is more specifically a synthesizer with a built-in low-wattage power amplifier and small loudspeakers. Electronic keyboards are capable of recreating a wide range of instrument sounds (piano, electric piano, Hammond organ, pipe organ, violin, etc.) and synthesizer tones with less complex sound synthesis. Electronic keyboards are usually designed for home users, beginners and other non-professional users. They typically have unweighted keys. The least expensive models do not have velocity-sensitive keys, but mid- to high-priced models do
[...More...]

"Electronic Keyboard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

PA System
A public address system (PA system) is an electronic system comprising microphones, amplifiers, loudspeakers, and related equipment. It increases the apparent volume (loudness) of a human voice, musical instrument, or other acoustic sound source or recorded sound or music. PA systems are used in any public venue that requires that an announcer, performer, etc. be sufficiently audible at a distance or over a large area. Typical applications include sports stadiums, public transportation vehicles and facilities, and live or recorded music venues and events. A PA system
PA system
may include multiple microphones or other sound sources, a mixing console to combine and modify multiple sources, and multiple amplifiers and loudspeakers for louder volume or wider distribution. Simple PA systems are often used in small venues such as school auditoriums, churches, and small bars
[...More...]

"PA System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chuck Berry
Charles Edward Anderson Berry (October 18, 1926 – March 18, 2017) was an American singer, songwriter, musician, and one of the pioneers of rock and roll music. With songs such as "Maybellene" (1955), "Roll Over Beethoven" (1956), "Rock and Roll Music" (1957) and "Johnny B. Goode" (1958), Berry refined and developed rhythm and blues into the major elements that made rock and roll distinctive. Writing lyrics that focused on teen life and consumerism, and developing a music style that included guitar solos and showmanship, Berry was a major influence on subsequent rock music.[1] Born into a middle-class African-American family in St. Louis, Missouri, Berry had an interest in music from an early age and gave his first public performance at Sumner High School. While still a high school student he was convicted of armed robbery and was sent to a reformatory, where he was held from 1944 to 1947. After his release, Berry settled into married life and worked at an automobile assembly plant
[...More...]

"Chuck Berry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Maybellene
"Maybellene" is one of the first rock and roll songs. It was written and recorded in 1955 by Chuck Berry, and inspired/adapted from the Western Swing
Western Swing
fiddle tune "Ida Red", which was recorded in 1938 by Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys. Berry's song tells the story of a hot rod race and a broken romance. It was released in July 1955 as a single by Chess Records, of Chicago, Illinois.[3] It was Berry's first single and his first hit. "Maybellene" is considered one of the pioneering rock songs: Rolling Stone
Rolling Stone
magazine wrote, "Rock & roll guitar starts here."[4] The record is an early instance of the complete rock-and-roll package: youthful subject matter; a small, guitar-driven combo; clear diction; and an atmosphere of unrelenting excitement. The lyrics describe a man driving a V8 Ford chasing his unfaithful girlfriend in her Cadillac Coupe DeVille. The song was a major hit with both black and white audiences
[...More...]

"Maybellene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Valve Amplifier
A valve amplifier or tube amplifier is a type of electronic amplifier that uses vacuum tubes to increase the amplitude or power of a signal. Low to medium power valve amplifiers for frequencies below the microwaves were largely replaced by solid state amplifiers during the 1960s and 1970s
[...More...]

"Valve Amplifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

High Fidelity
High fidelity
High fidelity
(often shortened to hi-fi or hifi) is a term used by listeners, audiophiles and home audio enthusiasts to refer to high-quality reproduction of sound.[1] This is in contrast to the lower quality sound produced by inexpensive audio equipment, or the inferior quality of sound reproduction that can be heard in recordings made until the late 1940s. Ideally, high-fidelity equipment has inaudible noise and distortion, and a flat (neutral, uncolored) frequency response within the human hearing range.[2]Contents1 History 2 Listening tests 3 Semblance of realism 4 Modularity 5 Modern equipment 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit] Bell Laboratories
Bell Laboratories
began experimenting with a range of recording techniques in the early 1930s
[...More...]

"High Fidelity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Junior Barnard
Junior Barnard (born Lester Robert Barnard, December 17, 1920 in Coweta, Oklahoma
Coweta, Oklahoma
– April 15, 1951 in Fresno County, California) was a pioneering American electric guitarist. He is best known for his work with Bob Wills
Bob Wills
and his Texas Playboys. He is among the first electric guitarists to create a guitar effect that anticipated the fuzz tone. The strength of his picking induced some slight "overdrive" in the low-power amplifiers typical of the times. Barnard was killed in an automobile accident when he was thirty-years-old.[1] See also[edit]Bob Wills Western swingReferences[edit]^ http://www.adioslounge.com/get-it-low-the-dirty-guitar-of-junior-barnard/This article about a United States guitarist is a stub
[...More...]

"Junior Barnard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Humbucker
A humbucking pickup, humbucker, or double coil, is a type of electric guitar pickup that uses two coils to "buck the hum" (or cancel out the interference) picked up by coil pickups caused by electromagnetic interference, particularly mains hum. Most pickups use magnets to produce a magnetic field around the strings, and induce an electrical current in the surrounding coils as the strings vibrate (a notable exception is the piezoelectric pickup). Humbuckers work by pairing a coil with the north poles of its magnets oriented "up", (toward the strings) with another coil right next to it, which has the south pole of its magnets oriented up. By connecting the coils together out of phase, the interference is significantly reduced via phase cancellation: the string signals from both coils add up instead of canceling, because the magnets are placed in opposite polarity
[...More...]

"Humbucker" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Elmore James
Elmore James
Elmore James
(January 27, 1918 – May 24, 1963) was an American blues guitarist, singer, songwriter and bandleader.[1] He was known as "King of the Slide Guitar" and was noted for his use of loud amplification and his stirring voice.Contents1 Biography 2 Death 3 Sound 4 Influence 5 Discography5.1 Selected singles 5.2 Selected compilation albums6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] James was born Elmore Brooks in Richland, Holmes County, Mississippi, the illegitimate son of 15-year-old Leola Brooks, a field hand. His father was probably Joe Willie "Frost" James, who moved in with Leola, and Elmore took his surname. He began making music at the age of 12, using a simple one-string instrument (diddley bow, or jitterbug) strung on a shack wall. As a teen he performed at dances under the names Cleanhead and Joe Willie James
[...More...]

"Elmore James" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Loudspeaker
A loudspeaker (or loud-speaker or speaker) is an electroacoustic transducer;[1] which converts an electrical audio signal into a corresponding sound.[2] The most widely used type of speaker in the 2010s is the dynamic speaker, invented in 1925 by Edward W. Kellogg and Chester W. Rice. The dynamic speaker operates on the same basic principle as a dynamic microphone, but in reverse, to produce sound from an electrical signal. When an alternating current electrical audio signal is applied to its voice coil, a coil of wire suspended in a circular gap between the poles of a permanent magnet, the coil is forced to move rapidly back and forth due to Faraday's law of induction, which causes a diaphragm (usually conically shaped) attached to the coil to move back and forth, pushing on the air to create sound waves. Besides this most common method, there are several alternative technologies that can be used to convert an electrical signal into sound
[...More...]

"Loudspeaker" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Buddy Guy
George "Buddy" Guy (born July 30, 1936)[2] is an American blues guitarist and singer. He is an exponent of Chicago blues
Chicago blues
and has influenced eminent guitarists including Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page, Keith Richards, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jeff Beck
Jeff Beck
and John Mayer
[...More...]

"Buddy Guy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.