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Fuvahmulah
Fuvahmulah
Fuvahmulah
City (Dhivehi: ފުވައްމުލައް) is an island (atoll) in the Maldives. It is under Maldive administrative divisions of Gnaviyani Atoll
Gnaviyani Atoll
or Nyaviyani Atoll. The inhabitants speak a distinctive form of the Dhivehi language, known as "dhivehi bas". Fuvahmulah
Fuvahmulah
means " Island
Island
of the Areca nut
Areca nut
palms", Fuvah (or "Fua") in the local language. Other places in the world like Penang
Penang
in Malaysia and Guwahati
Guwahati
in Assam, India, are also named after this nut
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Ambarella
Spondias
Spondias
dulcis (syn. Spondias
Spondias
cytherea), known commonly as ambarella (ඇඹරැල්ලා) in Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
or June plum is an equatorial or tropical tree, with edible fruit containing a fibrous pit
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Reed (plant)
Reed is a common name for several tall, grass-like plants of wetlands.Contents1 Varieties 2 Use in construction 3 Use in thatching 4 Other uses 5 See also 6 External linksVarieties[edit] They are all members of the order Poales
Poales
(in the modern, expanded circumscription), and include:In the Poaceae
Poaceae
(grass) family Common reed
Common reed
( Phragmites australis
Phragmites australis
(Cav.) Trin
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Syzygium Cumini
Syzygium
Syzygium
cumini, commonly known as jambolan,[2] Java plum,[2] black plum[3] or jamun, is an evergreen tropical tree in the flowering plant family Myrtaceae. It is native to the Indian Subcontinent, adjoining regions of Southeast Asia, China and Queensland.[1] The name of the fruit is sometimes mistranslated as blackberry, which is a different fruit in an unrelated family. Syzygium
Syzygium
cumini has been spread overseas from India by Indian emigrants and at present is common in former tropical British colonies.[4] The tree was introduced to Florida
Florida
in 1911 by the USDA, and is also now commonly grown in Suriname, Guyana
Guyana
and Trinidad and Tobago
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Pond-apple
Annona
Annona
glabra () Annona
Annona
glabraFruitScientific classification Kingdom: PlantaeClade: AngiospermsClade: MagnoliidsOrder: MagnolialesFamily: AnnonaceaeGenus: AnnonaSpecies: A. glabraBinomial name Annona
Annona
glabra L. Annona
Annona
glabra is a tropical fruit tree in the family Annonaceae, in the same genus as the Soursop
Soursop
and Cherimoya. Common names include pond apple, alligator apple (so called because American alligators often eat the fruit), swamp apple, corkwood, bobwood, and monkey apple.[1] The tree is native to Florida
Florida
in the United States, the Caribbean, Central and South America, and West Africa.[2] It is common in the Everglades. The A. glabra tree is considered an invasive species in Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and Australia
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Mango
Mangoes are juicy stone fruit (drupe) from numerous species of tropical trees belonging to the flowering plant genus Mangifera, cultivated mostly for their edible fruit. The majority of these species are found in nature as wild mangoes. The genus belongs to the cashew family Anacardiaceae. Mangoes are native to South Asia,[1][2] from where the "common mango" or "Indian mango", Mangifera
Mangifera
indica, has been distributed worldwide to become one of the most widely cultivated fruits in the tropics. Other Mangifera
Mangifera
species (e.g
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Pineapple
The pineapple ( Ananas
Ananas
comosus) is a tropical plant with an edible multiple fruit consisting of coalesced berries, also called pineapples,[2][3] and the most economically significant plant in the Bromeliaceae
Bromeliaceae
fami
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Screwpine
Pandanus
Pandanus
is a genus of monocots with some 750 accepted species.[2] They are palm-like, dioecious trees and shrubs native to the Old World tropics and subtropics. Common names include pandan[3] (/ˈpændən/),[4] screw palm,[3] and screw pine.[3] They are classified in the order Pandanales, family Pandanaceae.[5][6]Contents1 Description 2 Ecology 3 Cultivation and uses 4 Selected species 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksDescription[edit]Aerial, prop roots[7]Often called pandanus palms, these plants are not closely related to palm trees
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Tropical Almond
Terminalia catappa
Terminalia catappa
is a large tropical tree in the leadwood tree family, Combretaceae, that grows mainly in the tropical regions of Asia, Africa, and Australia.[2] It is known by the English common names country-almond, Indian-almond, Malabar-almond, sea-almond, tropical-almond[3] and false kamani.[4]Contents1 Description 2 Habitat and range 3 Cultivation and uses 4 Gallery 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit]Leaves before falling in Kolkata, West Bengal, IndiaThe tree grows to 35 m (115 ft) tall, with an upright, symmetrical crown and horizontal branches. Terminalia catappa
Terminalia catappa
has corky, light fruit that are dispersed by water. The seed within the fruit is edible when fully ripe, tasting almost like almond. As the tree gets older, its crown becomes more flattened to form a spreading, vase shape. Its branches are distinctively arranged in tiers
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Cheese Fruit
Morinda
Morinda
citrifolia is a tree in the coffee family, Rubiaceae. Its native range extends through Southeast Asia
Southeast Asia
and Australasia, and the species is now cultivated throughout the tropics and widely naturalized.[1] Among some 100 names for the fruit across different regions are the more common English names, great morinda, Indian mulberry, noni, beach mulberry, and cheese fruit.[2]Noni in cross-sectionNoni fruitContents1 Growing habitats 2 Food 3 Traditional medicine 4 Dyes 5 Nutrients and phytochemicals 6 Gallery 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksGrowing habitats[edit] Morinda
Morinda
citrifolia grows in shady forests, as well as on open rocky or sandy shores.[3] It reaches maturity in about 18 months, then yields between 4 and 8 kg (8.8 and 17.6 lb) of fruit every month throughout the year. It is tolerant of saline soils, drought conditions, and secondary soils
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Banana
A banana is an edible fruit – botanically a berry[1][2] – produced by several kinds of large herbaceous flowering plants in the genus Musa.[3] In some countries, bananas used for cooking may be called plantains, in contrast to dessert bananas. The fruit is variable in size, color, and firmness, but is usually elongated and curved, with soft flesh rich in starch covered with a rind, which may be green, yellow, red, purple, or brown when ripe. The fruits grow in clusters hanging from the top of the plant. Almost all modern edible parthenocarpic (seedless) bananas come from two wild species – Musa acuminata
Musa acuminata
and Musa balbisiana. The scientific names of most cultivated bananas are Musa acuminata, Musa balbisiana, and Musa × paradisiaca for the hybrid Musa acuminata
Musa acuminata
× M. balbisiana, depending on their genomic constitution
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Common Moorhen
About 5, see textRange of G. chloropus      Breeding range     Year-round range     Wintering rangeSynonymsFulica chloropus Linnaeus, 1758The common moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) (also known as the waterhen and as the swamp chicken[2]) is a bird species in the family Rallidae. It is distributed across many parts of the Old World.[3] The common moorhen lives around well-vegetated marshes, ponds, canals and other wetlands. The species is not found in the polar regions or many tropical rainforests
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Cucumber
Cucumber
Cucumber
( Cucumis
Cucumis
sativus) is a widely cultivated plant in the gourd family, Cucurbitaceae. It is a creeping vine that bears cucumiform fruits that are used as vegetables. There are three main varieties of cucumber: slicing, pickling, and seedless. Within these varieties, several cultivars have been created. In North America, the term "wild cucumber" refers to plants in the genera Echinocystis
Echinocystis
and Marah, but these are not closely related. The cucumber is originally from South Asia, but now grows on most continents
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Tomato
Lycopersicon lycopersicum (L.) H. Karst. Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.[1]The tomato (see pronunciation) is the edible, often red, vegetable of the plant Solanum
Solanum
lycopersicum,[2] commonly known as a tomato plant. The plant belongs to the nightshade family, Solanaceae.[1] The species originated in western South America.[2][3] The Nahuatl
Nahuatl
(Aztec language) word tomatl gave rise to the Spanish word "tomate", from which the English word tomato derived.[3][4] Its use as a cultivated food may have originated with the indigenous peoples of México.[2][5] The Spanish discovered the tomato from their contact with the Aztec peoples during the Spanish colonization of the Americas, then brought it to Europe, and, from there, to other parts of the European colonized world during the 16th century.[2] Tomato
Tomato
is consumed in diverse ways, including raw, as an ingredient in many dishes, sauces, salads, and drinks
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Carrot
The carrot ( Daucus
Daucus
carota subsp. sativus) is a root vegetable, usually orange in colour, though purple, black, red, white, and yellow cultivars exist.[1] Carrots are a domesticated form of the wild carrot, Daucus
Daucus
carota, native to Europe and southwestern Asia. The plant probably originated in Persia and was originally cultivated for its leaves and seeds. The most commonly eaten part of the plant is the taproot, although the greens are sometimes eaten as well. The domestic carrot has been selectively bred for its greatly enlarged, more palatable, less woody-textured taproot. The carrot is a biennial plant in the umbellifer family Apiaceae. At first, it grows a rosette of leaves while building up the enlarged taproot. Fast-growing cultivars mature within three months (90 days) of sowing the seed, while slower-maturing cultivars are harvested four months later (120 days)
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