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Funnel
A funnel is a pipe with a wide (often conical) mouth and a narrow stem. It is used to channel liquid or fine-grained substances into containers with a small opening. Without a funnel, spillage may occur. Funnels are usually made of stainless steel, aluminium, glass, or plastic. The material used in its construction should be sturdy enough to withstand the weight of the substance being transferred, and it should not react with the substance. For this reason, stainless steel or glass are useful in transferring diesel, while plastic funnels are useful in the kitchen. Sometimes disposable paper funnels are used in cases where it would be difficult to adequately clean the funnel afterwards (for example, in adding motor oil to a car). Dropper funnels, also called dropping funnels or tap funnels, have a tap to allow the controlled release of a liquid
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Toolbox
A toolbox (also called toolkit, tool chest or workbox) is a box to organize, carry, and protect the owner's tools. They could be used for trade, a hobby or DIY, and their contents vary with the craft of the owner.Contents1 Types of toolboxes1.1 Material2 Alternatives to toolboxes 3 Toolboxes in computing 4 See also 5 External linksTypes of toolboxes[edit] A toolbox could refer to several types of storage to hold tools. It could mean a small portable box that can carry a few tools to a project location or a large storage system set on casters. Modern toolboxes are predominantly metal or plastic
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Stone Of Madness
The stone of folly or the stone of madness refers to a hypothetical procedure in the 15th century involving trepanation and extraction of a stone, thought to be the cause of the patient's madness.[1][2] This procedure is demonstrated in the painting The Extraction of the Stone of Madness by Hieronymus Bosch.[3] The procedure and the painting depicting it inspired the 2002 Canadian short film The Stone of Folly.[4] Gallery[edit]Quentin Massys: An Allegory of Folly (early 16th century). The fool has a "stone of folly" in his forehead.Pieter Huys: A surgeon extracting the stone of follyPieter Jansz. Quast, Die Steinoperation, ca 1630References[edit]^ Vigué, Jordi (2002). Great Masters of Western Art. ISBN 0-8230-2113-0. There was a popular belief that a so-called "stone of madness" caused idiocy or dementia. To cure this, it was believed necessary to remove a section of the ...  ^ Shorter, Edward. A History of Psychiatry
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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RMS Olympic
RMS Olympic
RMS Olympic
(/ʊˈlɪmpɪk/) was a British transatlantic ocean liner, the lead ship of the White Star Line's trio of Olympic-class liners. Unlike her younger sister ships, Olympic had a long career, launched in 1910 and spanning 24 years from 1911 to 1935. This included service as a troopship during the First World War, which gained her the nickname "Old Reliable"
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Liquid-liquid Extraction
Liquid–liquid extraction
Liquid–liquid extraction
(LLE), also known as solvent extraction and partitioning, is a method to separate compounds or metal complexes, based on their relative solubilities in two different immiscible liquids, usually water (polar) and an organic solvent (non-polar). There is a net transfer of one or more species from one liquid into another liquid phase, generally from aqueous to organic. The transfer is driven by chemical potential, i.e. once the transfer is complete, the overall system of protons and electrons that make up the solutes and the solvents are in a more stable configuration (lower free energy). The solvent that is enriched in solute(s) is called extract. The feed solution that is depleted in solute(s) is called the raffinate
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Arthropod
Condylipoda Latreille, 1802An arthropod (from Greek ἄρθρον arthron, "joint" and πούς pous, "foot") is an invertebrate animal having an exoskeleton (external skeleton), a segmented body, and paired jointed appendages. Arthropods form the phylum Euarthropoda,[1][3] which includes insects, arachnids, myriapods, and crustaceans. The term Arthropoda as originally proposed refers to a proposed grouping of Euarthropods and the phylum Onychophora. Arthropods are characterized by their jointed limbs and cuticle made of chitin, often mineralised with calcium carbonate. The arthropod body plan consists of segments, each with a pair of appendages. The rigid cuticle inhibits growth, so arthropods replace it periodically by moulting. Their versatility has enabled them to become the most species-rich members of all ecological guilds in most environments
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Plant Litter
Litterfall, plant litter, leaf litter, tree litter, soil litter, or duff, is dead plant material, such as leaves, bark, needles, twigs, and cladodes; that have fallen to the ground. This detritus or dead organic material and its constituent nutrients are added to the top layer of soil, commonly known as the litter layer or O horizon
O horizon
("O" for "organic")
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Polyethylene
Polyethylene
Polyethylene
or polythene (abbreviated PE; IUPAC
IUPAC
name polyethene or poly(ethylene)) is the most common plastic. The annual global production is around 80 million tonnes.[3] Its primary use is in packaging (plastic bags, plastic films, geomembranes, containers including bottles, etc.). Many kinds of polyethylene are known, with most having the chemical formula (C2H4)n
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Hieronymus Bosch
Hieronymus Bosch
Hieronymus Bosch
(/ˌhaɪ.əˈrɒnɪməs ˈbɒʃ/;[1] Dutch: [ɦijeːˈroːnimɵz ˈbɔs] ( listen);[2] born Jheronimus van Aken[3] [jeːˈroːnimɵs fɑn ˈaːkə(n)];[4] c. 1450 – 9 August 1516) was a Dutch/ Netherlandish
Netherlandish
draughtsman and painter from Brabant. He is widely considered one of the most notable representatives of Early Netherlandish
Netherlandish
painting school. His work is known for its fantastic illustrations of religious concepts and narratives.[5] Within his lifetime his work was collected in the Netherlands, Austria, and Spain, and widely copied, especially his macabre and nightmarish depictions of hell. Little is known of Bosch's life, though there are some records. He spent most of it in the town of 's-Hertogenbosch, where he was born in his grandfather's house
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Thistle
Thistle
Thistle
is the common name of a group of flowering plants characterised by leaves with sharp prickles on the margins, mostly in the family Asteraceae. Prickles occur all over the plant – on the stem and flat parts of leaves. They are an adaptation that protects the plant from being eaten by herbivores
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Ship Of Fools (painting)
Ship of Fools (painted c. 1490–1500) is a painting by Hieronymus Bosch, now on display in the Musée du Louvre, Paris. The surviving painting is a fragment of a triptych that was cut into several parts. The Ship of Fools was painted on one of the wings of the altarpiece, and is about two thirds of its original length. The bottom third of the panel belongs to Yale University Art Gallery and is exhibited under the title Allegory of Gluttony. The wing on the other side, which has more or less retained its full length, is the Death and the Miser, now in the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
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Allegory Of Gluttony And Lust
Allegory of Intemperance is a Hieronymus Bosch painting made sometime between 1490 and 1500. It is currently in the Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut.[1] This panel is the left inside bottom wing of a hinged triptych. The other identified parts are The Ship of Fools, which formed the upper left panel, and the Death and the Miser, which was the right panel; The Wayfarer was painted on the right panel rear. The central panel, if existed, is unknown. The Allegory represented a condemnation of gluttony, in the same way the right panel condemned avarice.[2] The fragment shows a fat man riding a barrel in a kind of lake or pool. He is surrounded by other people, who push him or pour a liquid from the barrel. Below, a man swims with, above his head, a vessel with meat. The swimmer's clothes lie on the shore at bottom
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Cebuano (language)
The Cebuano language, alternatively called Cebuan (/sɛˈbuːən/ seh-BOO-ən)[8][9] and also often colloquially albeit informally referred to by most of its speakers simply as Bisaya ("Visayan", not to be confused with other Visayan languages nor Brunei Bisaya language), is an Austronesian regional language spoken in the Philippines by about 21 million people, mostly in Central Visayas,[10] western parts of Eastern Visayas and most parts of Mindanao, most of whom belong to various Visayan ethnolingusitic groups, mainly the Cebuanos.[11] It is the by far the most widely spoken of the Visayan languages, which are in turn part of wider the Philippine languages. The reference to the language as Bisaya is not encouraged by linguists due to the many languages within the Visayan language group that may be confused with the term
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Tin Woodman
The Tin
Tin
Woodman, better known as either the Tin
Tin
Man or (incorrectly) the Tin
Tin
Woodsman (the third name appears only in adaptations, the first—and in rare instances, the second—was used by Baum), is a character in the fictional Land of Oz
Land of Oz
created by American author L. Frank Baum. Baum's Tin
Tin
Woodman first appeared in his classic 1900 book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and reappeared in many other Oz books. In late 19th-century America, men made out of various tin pieces were used in advertising and political cartoons
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