HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Funk
Funk
Funk
is a music genre that originated in the mid-1960s when African American musicians created a rhythmic, danceable new form of music through a mixture of soul music, jazz, and rhythm and blues (R&B). Funk
Funk
de-emphasizes melody and chord progressions used in other related genres and brings a strong rhythmic groove of a bass line played by an electric bassist and a drum part played by a drummer to the foreground. Like much of African-inspired music, funk typically consists of a complex groove with rhythm instruments playing interlocking grooves
[...More...]

"Funk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Music Genre
A music genre is a conventional category that identifies some pieces of music as belonging to a shared tradition or set of conventions.[1] It is to be distinguished from musical form and musical style, although in practice these terms are sometimes used interchangeably.[2][not in citation given] Recently, academics have argued that categorizing music by genre is inaccurate and outdated.[3] Music
Music
can be divided into different genres in many different ways. The artistic nature of music means that these classifications are often subjective and controversial, and some genres may overlap. There are even varying academic definitions of the term genre itself. In his book Form in Tonal Music, Douglass M. Green distinguishes between genre and form. He lists madrigal, motet, canzona, ricercar, and dance as examples of genres from the Renaissance period. To further clarify the meaning of genre, Green writes, "Beethoven's Op. 61 and Mendelssohn's Op
[...More...]

"Music Genre" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hammond Organ
The Hammond organ
Hammond organ
is an electric organ, invented by Laurens Hammond and John M. Hanert[6] and first manufactured in 1935.[7] Various models have been produced, most of which use sliding drawbars to specify a variety of sounds. Until 1975, Hammond organs generated sound by creating an electric current from rotating a metal tonewheel near an electromagnetic pickup, and then strengthening the signal with an amplifier so it can drive a speaker cabinet. Around two million Hammond organs have been manufactured. The organ is commonly used with, and associated with, the Leslie speaker. The organ was originally marketed and sold by the Hammond Organ Company to churches as a lower-cost alternative to the wind-driven pipe organ, or instead of a piano. It quickly became popular with professional jazz musicians in organ trios, a small group centered on the Hammond organ
[...More...]

"Hammond Organ" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Keyboard Instrument
A keyboard instrument is a musical instrument played using a keyboard, a row of levers which are pressed by the fingers. The most common of these are the piano, organ, and various electronic keyboards, including synthesizers and digital pianos. Other keyboard instruments include celestas, which are struck idiophones operated by a keyboard, and carillons, which are usually housed in bell towers or belfries of churches or municipal buildings.[1] Today, the term keyboard often refers to keyboard-style synthesizers. Under the fingers of a sensitive performer, the keyboard may also be used to control dynamics, phrasing, shading, articulation, and other elements of expression—depending on the design and inherent capabilities of the instrument.[1] Another important use of the word keyboard is in historical musicology, where it means an instrument whose identity cannot be firmly established
[...More...]

"Keyboard Instrument" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Drum Machine
A drum machine is an electronic musical instrument designed to imitate the sound of drums, cymbals, other percussion instruments and often basslines. They are usually used when session drummers are not available or if the production cannot afford the cost of a drummer. Also, many modern drum machines can also produce unique sounds, as well as allowing the user to compose unique drum beats and patterns that might be difficult to perform by a human drummer
[...More...]

"Drum Machine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Drum Kit
A drum kit — also called a drum set, trap set, or simply drums — is a collection of drums and other percussion instruments, typically cymbals, which are set up on stands to be played by a single player,[1] with drumsticks held in both hands, and the feet operating pedals that control the hi-hat cymbal and the beater for the bass drum. A drum kit consists of a mix of drums (categorized classically as membranophones, Hornbostel-Sachs high-level classification 2) and idiophones - most significantly cymbals, but can also include the woodblock and cowbell (classified as Hornbostel-Sachs high-level classification 1).[2] In the 2000s, some kits also include electronic instruments ( Hornbostel-Sachs classification 53)
[...More...]

"Drum Kit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Congas
The conga, also known as tumbadora, is a tall, narrow, single-headed drum from Cuba. Congas are staved like barrels and classified into three types: quinto (lead drum, highest), tres dos or tres golpes (middle), and tumba or salidor (lowest). Congas were originally used in Afro-Cuban music genres such as conga (hence their name) and rumba, where each drummer would play a single drum. Following numerous innovations in conga drumming and construction during the mid-20th century, as well as its internationalization, it became increasingly common for drummers to play two or three drums
[...More...]

"Congas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Horn Section
A horn section is a group of musicians playing horns. In an orchestra or concert band, it refers to the musicians who play the "French" horn, and in a British-style brass band it is the tenor horn players. In many popular-music genres the term is applied loosely to any group of woodwind or brass instruments, or a combination of woodwinds and brass.Contents1 Symphonic horn section 2 Popular-music horn section2.1 Notable horn sections3 ReferencesSymphonic horn section[edit] In a symphony orchestra, the horn section is the group of symphonic musicians who play the French horn
French horn
(or German horn
German horn
or Vienna horn). These musicians are typically seated to the back of the ensemble and may be on either side at the director's discretion. Placing them to the left with their bells toward the audience increases the prominence of the section, whereas on the right, the sound reflects off the back of the stage
[...More...]

"Horn Section" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Piano
The piano is an acoustic, stringed musical instrument invented in Italy
Italy
by Bartolomeo Cristofori
Bartolomeo Cristofori
around the year 1700 (the exact year is uncertain), in which the strings are struck by hammers. It is played using a keyboard,[1] which is a row of keys (small levers) that the performer presses down or strikes with the fingers and thumbs of both hands to cause the hammers to strike the strings. The word piano is a shortened form of pianoforte, the Italian term for the early 1700s versions of the instrument, which in turn derives from gravicembalo col piano e forte[2] and fortepiano
[...More...]

"Piano" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

James Gang Rides Again
James Gang
James Gang
Rides Again (alternatively known as simply Rides Again)[1] is the second studio album by American rock band James Gang. The album was released in mid 1970, on the label ABC Records. It is the James Gang's first album to feature bassist Dale Peters.Contents1 Critical reception 2 Cultural significance 3 Track listing 4 Personnel4.1 Musicians 4.2 Production5 ReferencesCritical reception[edit]Professional ratingsReview scoresSource RatingAllMusic [2]Robert Christgau B–[3]Writing for AllMusic, critic Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Stephen Thomas Erlewine
wrote of the album "With their second album Rides Again, the James Gang
James Gang
came into their own... Walsh's songwriting had improved, giving the band solid support for their stylistic experiments
[...More...]

"James Gang Rides Again" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Electric Guitar
An electric guitar is a guitar that uses one or more pickups to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals. The vibration occurs when a guitarist strums, plucks, fingerpicks, or taps the strings. The pickup used to sense the vibration generally uses electromagnetic induction to do so, though other technologies exist. In any case, the signal generated by an electric guitar is too weak to drive a loudspeaker, so it is sent to a guitar amplifier before being sent to the speaker, which converts it into audible sound. Since the output of an electric guitar is an electric signal, it can be electronically altered by to change the timbre of the sound
[...More...]

"Electric Guitar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Glitch Hop
Glitch
Glitch
is a genre of electronic music that emerged in the late 1990s. It has been described as a genre that adheres to an "aesthetic of failure," where the deliberate use of glitch-based audio media, and other sonic artifacts, is a central concern.[1] Sources of glitch sound material are usually malfunctioning or abused audio recording devices or digital electronics, such as CD skipping, electric hum, digital or analog distortion, bit-rate reduction, hardware noise, software bugs, crashes, vinyl record hiss or scratches, and system errors.[2] In a
[...More...]

"Glitch Hop" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Oldschool Jungle
Multiple issuesThis article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)This article possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed
[...More...]

"Oldschool Jungle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Contemporary R&B
Contemporary R&B (also known as simply R&B), is a music genre that combines elements of pop, rhythm and blues, soul, funk, hip hop, gospel and electronic dance music. The genre features a distinctive record production style, drum machine-backed rhythms, an occasional saxophone-laced beat to give a jazz feel (mostly common in contemporary R&B songs prior to the year 1995) and a smooth, lush style of vocal arrangement. Electronic influences are becoming an increasing trend and the use of hip hop or dance-inspired beats are typical, although the roughness and grit inherent in hip hop may be reduced and smoothed out. Contemporary R&B vocalists are often known for their use of melisma, popularized by vocalists such as Michael Jackson, R
[...More...]

"Contemporary R&B" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

UK Funky
UK funky (sometimes known as UKF or funky[1]) is a genre of dance music from the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
that is heavily influenced by soulful house, Afrobeat, soca, tribal house, broken beat, grime and UK garage.[1] Typically, UK funky blends beats, bass loops and synths with African and Latin percussion
Latin percussion
in the dem bow rhythm and contemporary R&B-style vocals.Contents1 Characteristics 2 History 3 References 4 External linksCharacteristics[edit] UK funky uses tempos of around 130bpm. Drum patterns vary between tracks, using either "4 to the floor" or a syncopated style. The drum patterns commonly also include percussion playing African inspired rhythms. Instrumentation varies widely, but drum machines and synthesizers are common. There are similarities to garage in rhythmic, musical and vocal styles
[...More...]

"UK Funky" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

New Jack Swing
New jack swing or swingbeat[1] is a fusion genre spearheaded by Teddy Riley and Bernard Belle that became popular from the late 1980s into the mid 1990s.[2] One can describe it as a modern-day upheaval of swing music, sophisticated bubblegum pop as characterised by quirky or ruddy samples/sound affects, a hip hop vibe in a church scenery or a minimal precursor or second-cousin to 90s dance and house music, the latter partly based on fashion. The genre's run-time spanned from 1986 ("Nasty" by Janet Jackson) to 1995 ("Scream" by Michael and Janet Jackson). Its influence, along with hip hop, seeped into pop culture and was the definitive sound of the inventive black New York club scene. It fuses the rhythms, samples, and production techniques of hip hop and dance-pop with the urban contemporary sound of R&B. The new jack swing style developed as many previous music styles did, by combining elements of older styles with newer sensibilities
[...More...]

"New Jack Swing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.