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Funeral Director
A funeral director, also known as an undertaker (British English) or mortician (American English), is a professional involved in the business of funeral rites. These tasks often entail the embalming and burial or cremation of the dead, as well as the planning and arrangement of the actual funeral ceremony. Funeral
Funeral
directors may at times be asked to perform tasks such as dressing (in garments usually suitable for daily wear), casketing (placing the human body in the coffin), and cossetting (applying any sort of cosmetic or substance to the best viewable areas of the corpse for the purpose of enhancing its appearance)
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Mortician (band)
Mortician is a death metal band from Yonkers, New York
Yonkers, New York
founded in 1989.[1] They have released most of their albums since the House by the Cemetery EP on Relapse Records
Relapse Records
but have released their latest album on their own label, Mortician Records. They have toured several times through America and Europe. The band is heavily inspired by horror movies, which is expressed in the lyrics, the artwork, and the use of samples throughout their discography.Contents1 History 2 Current Lineup 3 Past Members 4 Discography4.1 Demos 4.2 Albums 4.3 EPs and singles 4.4 Compilations 4.5 Live albums5 Tribute Albums 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Mortician was formed in 1989 under the name Casket. The band's name was later changed to Mortician after writing their first song, "Mortician".[2] The band began using a drum machine after original drummer Matt Sicher was dismissed
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Fat Necrosis
Fat
Fat
necrosis is a form of necrosis characterized by the action upon fat by digestive enzymes.[1] In fat necrosis the enzyme lipase releases fatty acids from triglycerides. The fatty acids then complex with calcium to form soaps. These soaps appear as white chalky deposits.[2] It is usually associated with trauma of the pancreas or acute pancreatitis.[2][3] It can also occur in the breast,[4] the salivary glands [1] and neonates after a traumatic delivery. See also[edit]Necrosis Coagulative necrosis Liquefactive necrosis Caseous necrosis MyospherulosisReferences[edit]^ "Cell Injury".  ^ a b Kumar, Vinay; Abbas, Abul K.; Fausto, Nelson; & Mitchell, Richard N. (2007). Robbins Basic Pathology
Pathology
(8th ed.). Saunders Elsevier. pp. 10-11 ISBN 978-1-4160-2973-1 ^ "fat necrosis" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary ^ Lövey K, Fodor J, Major T, et al. (November 2007)
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Associate's Degree
An associate degree (or associate's degree) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded by colleges and universities upon completion of a course of study intended to usually last two years or more. It is considered to be a greater level of education than a high school diploma or GED. The first associate degrees were awarded in the U.K. (where they are[when?] no longer awarded) in 1873 before spreading to the U.S. in 1898
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Apprentice
An apprenticeship is a system of training a new generation of practitioners of a trade or profession with on-the-job training and often some accompanying study (classroom work and reading). Apprenticeship
Apprenticeship
also enables practitioners to gain a license to practice in a regulated profession. Most of their training is done while working for an employer who helps the apprentices learn their trade or profession, in exchange for their continued labor for an agreed period after they have achieved measurable competencies. Apprenticeships typically last 3 to 7 years
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Necrosis
Necrosis
Necrosis
(from the Greek νέκρωσις "death, the stage of dying, the act of killing" from νεκρός "dead") is a form of cell injury which results in the premature death of cells in living tissue by autolysis.[1] Necrosis
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Avascular Necrosis
Avascular necrosis
Avascular necrosis
(AVN), also called osteonecrosis or bone infarction, is death of bone tissue due to interruption of the blood supply.[1] Early on there may be no symptoms.[1] Gradually joint pain may develop which may limit the ability to move.[1] Complication may include collapse of the bone or nearby joint surface.[1] Risk factors include bone fractures, joint dislocations, alcoholism, and the use of high dose steroids.[1] The condition may also occur without any clear reason.[1] The most commonly affected bone is the femur.[1] Othe
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Coagulative Necrosis
Coagulative necrosis is a type of accidental cell death typically caused by ischemia or infarction. In coagulative necrosis the architecture of dead tissue is preserved for at least a couple of days.[1] It is believed that the injury denatures structural proteins as well as lysosomal enzymes thus blocking the proteolysis of the damaged cells. The lack of lysosomal enzymes allows it to maintain a "coagulated" morphology for some time
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Liquefactive Necrosis
Liquefactive necrosis (or colliquative necrosis) is a type of necrosis which results in a transformation of the tissue into a liquid viscous mass.[1] Often it is associated with focal bacterial or fungal infections, and can also manifest as one of the symptoms of an internal chemical burn.[2] In liquefactive necrosis, the affected cell is completely digested by hydrolytic enzymes, resulting in a soft, circumscribed lesion consisting of pus and the fluid remains of necrotic tissue. Dead leukocytes will remain as a creamy yellow pus.[1] After the removal of cell debris by white blood cells, a fluid filled space is left. It is generally associated with abscess formation and is commonly found in the central nervous system. In the brain[edit] For unclear reasons, hypoxic death of cells within the central nervous system can result in liquefactive necrosis.[1] This is a process in which lysosomes turn tissues into pus as a result of lysosomal release of digestive enzymes
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Gangrene
Gangrene
Gangrene
is a type of tissue death caused by not enough blood supply.[4] Symptoms may include a change in skin color to red or black, numbness, swelling, pain, skin breakdown, and coolness.[1] The feet and hands are most commonly involved.[1] Certain types may present with a fever or sepsis.[1] Risk factors include diabetes, peripheral arterial disease, smoking, major trauma, alcoholism, HIV/AIDS, frostbite, and Raynaud's syndrome.[3][4] It can be classified as dry gangrene, wet gangrene, gas gangrene, internal gangrene, and necrotizing fasciitis.[3] The diagnosis of gangrene is based on symptoms and suppo
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Caseous Necrosis
Caseous necrosis
Caseous necrosis
is a form of cell death in which the tissue maintains a cheese-like appearance.[1] The dead tissue appears as a soft and white proteinaceous dead cell mass.Contents1 Causes 2 Appearance 3 References 4 External linksCauses[edit] Frequently, caseous necrosis is encountered in the foci of tuberculosis infections.[1] It can also be caused by syphilis and certain fungi. A similar appearance can be associated with histoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, and coccidioidomycosis.[2] Appearance[edit] In caseous necrosis no histological architecture is preserved
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Fibrinoid Necrosis
Fibrinoid necrosis
Fibrinoid necrosis
is a form of necrosis, or tissue death, in which there is accumulation of amorphous, basic, proteinaceous material in the tissue matrix with a staining pattern reminiscent of fibrin. It is associated with conditions such as immune vasculitis (e.g. polyarteritis nodosa), malignant hypertension, preeclampsia, or hyperacute transplant rejection. In small vessel vasculitis, fibrin plugs frequently occur in the vessel lumen, but the term fibrinoid is usually used to refer to material outside the lumen of a vessel.[1] Fibrinoid necrosis
Fibrinoid necrosis
also occurs in the walls of arterioles in malignant hypertension (blood pressure greater than 200/130 mmHg).[2] Fibrinoid necrosis
Fibrinoid necrosis
is a special form of necrosis usually seen in immune reactions involving blood vessels, known as Type III hypersensitivity reactions
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Flower Car
A flower car is a type of vehicle used in the funeral industry, used to carry flowers for the burial service, or sometimes to carry the coffin under a bed of flowers. Built on the same commercial chassis as a hearse, the flower car has half-height rear bodywork on the rear similar to a pickup truck bed. The bed contains a liner to hold the flowers, normally built of stainless steel to resist rust. Some flower cars have a raised, flat tonneau cover across the bed at the top, upon which the flowers sit; the center portion sometimes is designed to raise and lower, hydraulically or by hand. If the flower car is designed to carry a casket, it will be stored under the tonneau cover in the space beneath, behind the opening rear gate. In the early years of the automobile, open-topped luxury cars were used for this purpose, but as enclosed vehicles became the norm, specially built vehicles began to be used for this purpose from approximately the 1930s onward
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Temporal Lobe Necrosis
Temporal lobe necrosis is a late-stage and serious complication usually occurring in persons who have undergone radiation treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). It is rather rare and occurs in 4-30% of patients who receive radiation treatment for NPC. Many patients who experience temporal lobe necrosis are asymptomatic. This demonstrates a need for consistent imaging follow up, such as MRI and/or PET/CT, to help with the potential management of it. Those who are symptomatic usually suffer from "vague" symptoms including headaches, dizziness, intracranial pressure, personality changes, seizures, and short-term memory loss
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Programmed Cell Death
Programmed cell death
Programmed cell death
(or PCD) is the death of a cell in any form, mediated by an intracellular program.[1][2] PCD is carried out in a biological process, which usually confers advantage during an organism's life-cycle. For example, the differentiation of fingers and toes in a developing human embryo occurs because cells between the fingers apoptose; the result is that the digits are separate. PCD serves fundamental functions during both plant and animal tissue development. Apoptosis
Apoptosis
and autophagy are both forms of programmed cell death, but necrosis was long seen as a non-physiological process that occurs as a result of infection or injury.[3] Necrosis
Necrosis
is the death of a cell caused by external factors such as trauma or infection and occurs in several different forms
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Activation-induced Cell Death (AICD)
AICD (activation-induced cell death) is programmed cell death caused by the interaction of Fas receptors (Fas, CD95) and Fas ligands (FasL, CD95 ligand).[1] AICD is a negative regulator of activated T lymphocytes that results from repeated stimulation of their T-cell receptors (TCR) and helps to maintain peripheral immune tolerance.[2] Alteration of the process may lead to autoimmune diseases.[1] The AICD effector cell is one that expresses FasL, and apoptosis is induced in the cell expressing the Fas receptor
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