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Fujiko Fujio
Fujiko Fujio
Fujiko Fujio
(藤子 不二雄, Fujiko Fujio) was a nom de plume of a manga writing duo formed by two Japanese manga artists. Their real names are Hiroshi Fujimoto (藤本 弘, Fujimoto Hiroshi, 1933–96) and Motoo Abiko (安孫子 素雄, Abiko Motoo, 1934–). They formed their partnership in 1951, and used the Fujiko Fujio
Fujiko Fujio
name from 1954 until dissolution of the partnership in 1987. From the outset they adopted a collaborative style where both worked simultaneously on the story and artwork, but as they diverged creatively they started releasing individual works under different names, Abiko as Fujiko A. Fujio (藤子不二雄Ⓐ, Fujiko Fujio
Fujiko Fujio
Ē), and Fujimoto as Fujiko F. Fujio (藤子・F・不二雄, Fujiko Efu Fujio)
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Yukinobu Hoshino
Yukinobu Hoshino
Yukinobu Hoshino
(星野 之宣, Hoshino Yukinobu, born January 29, 1954) is a Japanese manga artist. He was born in Kushiro, Hokkaidō and dropped out of Aichi Prefectural University of Fine Arts and Music mid-semester from the fine arts department. He made his debut in 1975 with Kotetsu no Queen and with Harukanaru Asa won the Tezuka prize for an outstanding manga. On 1976, he wrote Blue City for Shukan Shonen Jump. He won an Excellence Prize at the 2008 Japan Media Arts Festival for Munakata Kyouju Ikouroku.[1] Initially, his artistic style was similar to that of Mikiya Mochizuki and had humoristic touches, but moved on to the gekiga style. He is known for using the gekiga style to create detailed and serious science fiction stories based on American and European SF novels but creating a completely different storyline. He had also drawn various works based on ancient and pre-historic histories
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Magical Girl
Magical girl
Magical girl
(Japanese: 魔法 少女, Hepburn: mahō shōjo) is a subgenre of Japanese fantasy anime and manga which features girls who use magic. Although the genre has origins in Japan, it has been used as a motif outside Japan
Japan
in Western works such as Miraculous
Miraculous
Ladybug, Star vs
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List Of Manga Publishers
This article lists publishers of manga in various markets worldwide.Contents1 Australian 2 Chinese2.1 Traditional Chinese 2.2 Simplified Chinese3 Danish 4 Dutch 5 English5.1 Active (digital&print) 5.2 Active (digital content only) 5.3 Defunct6 Finnish 7 French 8 Japanese 9 German 10 Hungarian 11 Indonesian 12 Italian12.1 Defunct13 Malaysian 14 Polish14.1 Defunct15 Portuguese15.1 Brazilian Portuguese16 Russian 17 Spanish17.1 Spain17.1.1 Defunct17.2 Argentina17.2.1 Defunct17.3 Mexico17.3.1 Defunct18 Swedish 19 Tamil 20 Thai 21 Vietnamese 22 See also 23 External linksAustralian[edit]Alpha Manga
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List Of Manga Series By Volume Count
The list of manga series by volume count is a list of manga series that span at least 40 tankōbon volumes. There are 157 manga series from which 87 series are completed and 70 series are in ongoing serialization
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Alternative Manga
Alternative manga
Alternative manga
are Japanese comics that are published outside the more commercial manga market, or which have different art styles, themes, and narratives to those found in the more popular manga magazines.Contents1 History 2 Movements 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Alternative manga
Alternative manga
originated in the lending libraries of post-war Japan, which charged a small fee for borrowing books. This market was essentially its own marketplace with many manga being printed exclusively for it. The market was notorious amongst parental groups for containing more lewd content than the normal mainstream manga publishers would allow
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Kodomo Anime And Manga
Kodomo manga (子供向け漫画, Kodomo-muke manga) and kodomo anime (子供向けアニメ, Kodomo-muke anime), are Japanese terms which literally mean "manga (or "anime", respectively) directed towards children 5 to 8 years of age". Kodomo is Japanese for child.[1] These series are usually moralistic, teaching kids to stay in the right path in life. The series are generally stand-alone, or non-episodic. Doraemon
Doraemon
by Fujiko F. Fujio
Fujiko F. Fujio
is one of the most notable examples for this manga/anime demographic.[2]Contents1 History 2 Awards 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The genre started in the late 19th century with the production of short manga, approximately 15 pages long, printed in magazines. These short manga were created as a part of the Meiji era's attempt to encourage literacy amongst Japanese youth
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Shōnen Manga
Shōnen, shonen, or shounen manga (少年漫画, shōnen manga) is manga aimed at a teenage male target-demographic readership. The age group varies with individual readers and different magazines, but it is primarily intended for boys between the ages of 12 to 18. The kanji characters (少年) literally mean "boy" (or "youth"), and the characters (漫画) mean "cartoon" or "comic". Thus, the complete phrase means "young person's comic", or simply "boys' comic"; its female equivalent is shōjo manga. Shōnen manga
Shōnen manga
is the most popular form of manga.[1][2]Contents1 Summary1.1 Shōnen manga
Shōnen manga
today2 History2.1 Before World War II 2.2 Post-Occupation3 See also 4 References 5 External linksSummary[edit] Shōnen manga
Shōnen manga
is typically characterized by high-action,[3] often humorous plots featuring male protagonists
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Shōjo Manga
Shōjo, shojo, or shoujo manga (少女漫画, shōjo manga) is manga aimed at a teenage female target-demographic readership
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Seinen Manga
Seinen manga
Seinen manga
(青年漫画) are manga marketed toward young adult men.[1] In Japanese, the word "seinen" literally means "youth," but the term "seinen manga" is also used to describe the target audience of comics like Weekly Manga
Manga
Times and Weekly Manga
Manga
Goraku which are aimed at men from their 20s to their 50s. Seinen manga
Seinen manga
are distinguished from shōnen manga which are for younger boys, although some seinen manga like xxxHolic share some similarities with "shōnen" manga. Seinen manga
Seinen manga
can focus on action, politics, science fiction, fantasy, relationships, sports, or comedy. The female equivalent to seinen manga is josei manga. Seinen manga
Seinen manga
have a wide variety of art styles and variation in subject matter
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Josei Manga
Josei manga
Josei manga
(女性漫画, lit. comics for women, pronounced [dʑoseː]) are Japanese comics aimed at women in their late teens on into adulthood. Josei manga
Josei manga
are distinguished from "shōjo manga" (少女漫画) for younger girls on the one hand, and "ladies comics" (レディースコミックス, redīsu komikkusu) or "LadyComi" (レディコミ, redikomi), which tend to have erotic content on the other.[1] Readers can range in age from 15 to 45.[2] In Japanese, the word josei means simply "woman", "female", "feminine", "womanhood", and has no manga-related connotations at all.[3][4] Josei comics can portray realistic romance, as opposed to the mostly idealized romance of shōjo manga, but it does not always have to be. Josei tends to be both more sexually explicit and contain more mature storytelling, although that is not always true either
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Harem (genre)
Harem
Harem
(ハーレムもの, hāremumono; "from harem") in anime and manga is an emphasis on polygamous or love triangle relationships characterized by a protagonist surrounded amorously by three or more members of either the same and/or opposing gender, sex, and/or love interests.[1] When it is a yuri or male-hetero oriented harem series, the polygynous relationship is informally referred to as a female harem or seraglios
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Mecha Anime And Manga
Mecha
Mecha
anime and manga, known in Japan
Japan
as robot anime (ロボットアニメ, robotto anime) and robot manga (ロボット漫画, robotto manga), are anime and manga that feature robots (mecha) in battle. The genre is broken down into two subcategories; "super robot", featuring super-sized, implausible robots, and "real robot", where robots are governed by realistic physics and technological limitations. Mecha
Mecha
series cover a wide variety of genres, from comedy to drama, and the genre has expanded into other media, such as video game adaptations
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Dōjinshi
Dōjinshi
Dōjinshi
(同人誌, often transliterated doujinshi) is the Japanese term for self-published works, usually magazines, manga or novels. Dōjinshi
Dōjinshi
are often the work of amateurs, though some professional artists participate as a way to publish material outside the regular industry. Dōjinshi
Dōjinshi
are part of a wider category of dōjin including art collections, anime, hentai and games. Groups of dōjinshi artists refer to themselves as a sākuru (サークル, circle). A number of such groups actually consist of a single artist: they are sometimes called kojin sākuru (個人サークル, personal circles). Since the 1980s, the main method of distribution has been through regular dōjinshi conventions, the largest of which is called Comiket (short for "Comic Market") held in the summer and winter in Tokyo's Big Sight
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Yaoi
Yaoi
Yaoi
(/ˈjaʊi/; Japanese: やおい, Japanese: [ja.o.i]), primarily known as boys' love (BL) (ボーイズ ラブ, bōizu rabu) in Japan, is a Japanese genre of fictional media focusing on romantic or sexual relationships between male characters, typically marketed for a female audience and usually created by female authors. Yaoi
Yaoi
also attracts male readers, but manga specifically marketed for a gay male audience (bara) is considered a separate genre. The main characters in yaoi usually conform to the formula of the seme (the "top", or dominant figure) who pursues the uke (the "bottom", or passive figure). Material classified as yaoi typically depicts gay relationships between male characters and may include homoerotic content. Although the yaoi genre is also called Boys' Love (commonly abbreviated as BL), the characters may be of any age above puberty, including adults
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Yuri (genre)
Yuri (百合, "lily"), also known by the wasei-eigo construction Girls' Love (ガールズラブ, gāruzu rabu),[3] is a Japanese jargon term for content and a genre involving love between women in manga, anime, and related Japanese media.[4][5] Yuri focuses on the sexual orientation or the romantic orientation aspects of the relationship, or both, the latter of which sometimes being called shōjo-ai by Western fandom.[6] The themes yuri deals with have their roots in the Japanese lesbian fiction of the early twentieth century,[7][8] with pieces such as Yaneura no Nishojo by Nobuko Yoshiya.[9] Nevertheless, it is not until the 1970s that lesbian-themed works began to appear in manga, by the hand of artists such as Ryoko Yamagishi and Riyoko Ikeda.[1] The 1990s brought new trends in manga and anime, as well as in dōjinshi productions, along with
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