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Friedrich List
Georg Friedrich List
Friedrich List
(6 August 1789 – 30 November 1846) was a German economist with dual American citizenship[2] who developed the "National System", also known as the National System
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Slave Trade
The history of slavery spans many cultures, nationalities, and religions from ancient times to the present day. However the social, economic, and legal positions of slaves were vastly different in different systems of slavery in different times and places.[1] Slavery
Slavery
can be traced back to the earliest records, such as the Mesopotamian
Mesopotamian
Code of Hammurabi
Code of Hammurabi
(c. 1860 BC), which refers to it as an established institution, and it was common among ancient peoples.[2] Slavery
Slavery
is rare among hunter-gatherer populations, because it is developed as a system of social stratification.[3][4] Slavery
Slavery
was known in the very first civilizations such as Sumer
Sumer
in Mesopotamia which dates back as far as 3500 BC, as well as in almost every other civilization
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Rheinische Zeitung
The Rheinische Zeitung
Rheinische Zeitung
("Rhenish Newspaper") was a 19th-century German newspaper, edited most famously by Karl Marx. The paper was launched in January 1842 and terminated by Prussian state censorship in March 1843. The paper was eventually succeeded by a daily newspaper launched by Karl Marx
Karl Marx
on behalf of the Communist League
Communist League
in June 1848, called the Neue Rheinische Zeitung
Neue Rheinische Zeitung
("New Rhenish Newspaper").Contents1 Publication history1.1 Background 1.2 Establishment 1.3 Suppression 1.4 Legacy2 See also 3 Footnotes 4 Employees and writers of the Rheinische ZeitungPublication history[edit] Background[edit] The city of Cologne
Cologne
(Köln) has long been the most important urban center of the region of Germany
Germany
known as Rhineland
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Hamburg
Hamburg
Hamburg
(English: /ˈhæmbɜːrɡ/; German: [ˈhambʊɐ̯k] ( listen); locally: [ˈhambʊɪ̯ç] ( listen)), Low German/Low Saxon: Hamborg [ˈhambɔːç] ( listen), officially the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg
Hamburg
(German: Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg),[5] is the second-largest city of Germany
Germany
as well as one of the country's 16 constituent states, with a population of roughly 1.8 million people. The city lies at the core of the Hamburg Metropolitan Region
Hamburg Metropolitan Region
which spreads across four German federal states and is home to more than 5 million people. The official name reflects Hamburg's history as a member of the medieval Hanseatic League, a free imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire, a city-state and one of the 16 states of Germany. Before the 1871 Unification of Germany, it was a fully sovereign state
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Europe
Europe
Europe
is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Since around 1850, Europe
Europe
is most commonly considered as separated from Asia
Asia
by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[5] Though the term "continent" implies physical geography, the land border is somewhat arbitrary and has moved since its first conception in classical antiquity
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United States Senate
Majority (50)     Republican (50)Minority (49)     Democratic (47)      Independents (2) caucusing with the DemocratsVacant (1)     Vacant (1)Length of term6 yearsElectionsVoting systemFirst-past-the-post; nonpartisan blanket primary with a majoritarian second round in 3 states.Last electionNovember 8, 2016 (34 seats)Next electionNovember 6, 2018 (33 seats)Meeting placeSenate chamber United States
Unite

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Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Paris
Paris
(French pronunciation: ​[paʁi] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city in France, with an administrative-limits area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and an official population of 2,206,488 (2015).[5] The city is a commune and department, and the heart of the 12,012-square-kilometre (4
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Leipzig
Leipzig
Leipzig
(/ˈlaɪpsɪɡ/; German: [ˈlaɪptsɪç]) is the most populous city in the federal state of Saxony, Germany. With a population of 582,277 inhabitants[3] (1.1 million[4] residents in the larger urban zone)[1] it is Germany's tenth most populous city.[5][6] Leipzig
Leipzig
is located about 160 kilometres (99 mi) southwest of Berlin
Berlin
at the confluence of the White Elster, Pleisse, and Parthe
Parthe
rivers at the southern end of the North German Plain. Leipzig
Leipzig
has been a trade city since at least the time of the Holy Roman Empire.[7] The city sits at the intersection of the Via Regia and Via Imperii, two important medieval trade routes
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Augsburg
Augsburg
Augsburg
(German pronunciation: [ˈʔaʊ̯ksbʊʁk] ( listen); Austro-Bavarian: Augschburg) is a city in Swabia, Bavaria, Germany. It was a Free Imperial City
Free Imperial City
for over 500 years, and is notable for the Augsburg
Augsburg
Confession. It is a university town and home of the Regierungsbezirk
Regierungsbezirk
Schwaben and the Bezirk Schwaben. Augsburg
Augsburg
is an urban district and home to the institutions of the Landkreis Augsburg
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger
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Railway
Rail transport
Rail transport
is a means of transferring of passengers and goods on wheeled vehicles running on rails, also known as tracks. It is also commonly referred to as train transport. In contrast to road transport, where vehicles run on a prepared flat surface, rail vehicles (rolling stock) are directionally guided by the tracks on which they run. Tracks usually consist of steel rails, installed on ties (sleepers) and ballast, on which the rolling stock, usually fitted with metal wheels, moves
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Cologne
Cologne
Cologne
(English: /kəˈloʊn/; German: Köln, pronounced [kœln] ( listen), Ripuarian: Kölle [ˈkœɫə] ( listen)) is the largest city in the German federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia
North Rhine-Westphalia
and the fourth most populated city in Germany
Germany
(after Berlin, Hamburg, and Munich). It is located within the Rhine-Ruhr
Rhine-Ruhr
metropolitan region which is Germany's largest and one of Europe's major metropolitan areas. Cologne
Cologne
is about 45 kilometres (28 mi) southwest of North Rhine-Westphalia's capital of Dusseldorf
Dusseldorf
and 25 kilometres (16 mi) northwest of Bonn. Cologne
Cologne
is located on both sides of the Rhine, near Germany's borders with Belgium
Belgium
and the Netherlands
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Deutsche Bundespost
The Deutsche Bundespost
Deutsche Bundespost
(German federal post office) was a German state-run postal service and telecommunications business founded in 1947. It was initially the second largest federal employer during its time. After staff reductions in the 1980s, the staff was reduced to roughly 543,200 employees in 1985
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Karl Marx
Karl Marx[6] (/mɑːrks/;[7] German: [ˈkaɐ̯l ˈmaɐ̯ks]; 5 May 1818 – 14 March 1883) was a German philosopher, economist, historian, political theorist, sociologist, journalist and revolutionary socialist. Born in Trier
Trier
to a middle-class family, Marx studied law and Hegelian philosophy. Due to his political publications Marx became stateless and lived in exile in London, where he continued to develop his thought in collaboration with German thinker Friedrich Engels
Friedrich Engels
and publish his writings. His best-known titles are the 1848 pamphlet, The Communist
Communist
Manifesto, and the three-volume Das Kapital
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Adam Müller
Adam Heinrich Müller (30 June 1779 – 17 January 1829; after 1827 Ritter von Nitterdorf) was a German publicist, literary critic, political economist, theorist of the state and forerunner of economic romanticism.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Career2 Positions and theories2.1 Romanticist 2.2 Economics3 Writings 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Müller was born in Berlin. It was intended that he should study Protestant theology, but from 1798 he devoted himself in Göttingen to the study of law, philosophy, and natural science. He was a student of Gustav Hugo. Returning to Berlin, he was persuaded by his friend Friedrich von Gentz to take up political science. He had early formed a close intimacy with Gentz, his elder by 15 years; and this connection exercised an important influence both on his material circumstances and his mental development in after life
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