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Friday The 13th Mini-crash
The Friday the 13th mini-crash was a stock market crash that occurred on Friday, October 13, 1989. The crash - referred to by some as "Black Friday" - was apparently caused by a reaction to a news story of the breakdown of a $6.75 billion leveraged buyout deal for UAL Corporation, the parent company of United Airlines. When the UAL deal fell through, it helped trigger the collapse of the junk bond market. The deal unraveled because the Association of Flight Attendants
Association of Flight Attendants
pulled out of the deal when management, in negotiations over an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP) designed to fund the leveraged buyout, refused to agree to terms.[1]Contents1 The close 2 Survey 3 Aftermath 4 ReferencesThe close[edit] Moments after the UAL deal fell through, the indices began their plunge. By the time the closing bell rang, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was down 190.58 points, or 6.91 percent, to 2,569.26
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Robert Shiller
Robert James Shiller (born March 29, 1946)[4] is an American Nobel Laureate, economist, academic, and best-selling author
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Leveraged Buyout
A leveraged buyout (LBO) is a financial transaction in which a company is purchased with a combination of equity and debt, such that the company's cash flow is the collateral used to secure and repay the borrowed money. The use of debt, which has a lower cost of capital than equity, serves to reduce the overall cost of financing the acquisition. The cost of debt is lower because interest payments reduce corporate income tax liability, whereas dividend payments do not.[1] This reduced cost of financing allows greater gains to accrue to the equity, and, as a result, the debt serves as a lever to increase the returns to the equity.[2] The term LBO is usually employed when a financial sponsor acquires a company. However, many corporate transactions are partially funded by bank debt, thus effectively also representing an LBO
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Panic Of 1792
The Panic of 1792 was a financial credit crisis that occurred during the months of March and April 1792, precipitated by the expansion of credit by the newly formed Bank
Bank
of the United States as well as by rampant speculation on the part of William Duer, Alexander Macomb, and other prominent bankers. Duer, Macomb, and their colleagues attempted to drive up prices of US debt securities and bank stocks, but when they defaulted on loans, prices fell, causing a bank run. Simultaneous tightening of credit by the Bank
Bank
of the United States served to heighten the initial panic
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South Sea Company
The South Sea Company
South Sea Company
(officially The Governor and Company of the merchants of Great Britain, trading to the South Seas and other parts of America, and for the encouragement of fishing)[3] was a British joint-stock company founded in 1711, created as a public-private partnership to consolidate and reduce the cost of national debt. The company was also granted a monopoly to trade with South America and nearby islands, hence its name
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Mississippi Company
Mississippi
Mississippi
(/ˌmɪsɪˈsɪpi/ ( listen)) is a state in the Southern United States, with part of its southern border formed by the Gulf of Mexico. Its western border is formed by the Mississippi
Mississippi
River. The state has a population of approximately 3 million. It is the 32nd most extensive and the 32nd most populous of the 50 United States. Located in the center of the state, Jackson is the state capital and largest city, with a population of approximately 175,000 people. The state is heavily forested outside of the Mississippi Delta
Mississippi Delta
area, between the Mississippi
Mississippi
and Yazoo rivers. Before the American Civil War, most development in the state was along riverfronts, where slaves worked on cotton plantations. After the war, the bottomlands to the interior were cleared, mostly by freedmen
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Financial History Of The Dutch Republic
The financial history of the Dutch Republic
Dutch Republic
involves the interrelated development of financial institutions in the Dutch Republic. The rapid economic development of the country after the Dutch Revolt
Dutch Revolt
in the years 1585 - 1620 accompanied by an equally rapid accumulation of a large fund of savings, created the need to invest those savings profitably. The Dutch financial sector, both in its public and private components, came to provide a wide range of modern investment products beside the possibility of (re-)investment in trade and industry, and in infrastructure projects
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Savings And Loan Crisis
The savings and loan crisis of the 1980s and 1990s (commonly dubbed the S&L crisis) was the failure of 1,043 out of the 3,234 savings and loan associations in the United States from 1986 to 1995: the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation (FSLIC) closed or otherwise resolved 296 institutions from 1986 to 1989 and the Resolution Trust Corporation
Resolution Trust Corporation
(RTC) closed or otherwise resolved 747 institutions from 1989 to 1995.[1] A savings and loan or "thrift" is a financial institution that accepts savings deposits and makes mortgage, car and other personal loans to individual members (a cooperative venture known in the United Kingdom as a building society). By 1995, the RTC had closed 747 failed institutions nationwide, worth a total possible book value of between $402 and $407 billion
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Irrational Exuberance (book)
Irrational Exuberance is a March 2000 book[1] written by Nobel Prize-winning Yale University
Yale University
professor Robert J. Shiller, named after Alan Greenspan's "irrational exuberance" quote.Contents1 Overview 2 Quotations 3 Gallery 4 References 5 External linksOverview[edit] Published at the height of the dot-com boom, the text put forth several arguments demonstrating how the stock markets were overvalued at the time. The stock market collapse of 2000 happened the exact month of the book's publication. The second edition of Irrational Exuberance was published in 2005 and was updated to cover the housing bubble. Shiller wrote that the real estate bubble might soon burst, and he supported his claim by showing that median home prices were six to nine times greater than median income in some areas of the country. He also showed that home prices, when adjusted for inflation, have produced very modest returns of less than 1% per year
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Early 1990s Recession
The early 1990s recession describes the period of economic downturn affecting much of the Western world
Western world
in the early 1990s.Contents1 Background 2 Political ramifications2.1 Canada and the United States 2.2 Australia 2.3 New Zealand 2.4 Finland 2.5 United Kingdom3 Influence on culture 4 Civil unrest 5 See also 6 ReferencesBackground[edit] Primary factors believed to have led to the recession include the following: restrictive monetary policy enacted by Central banks primarily in response to inflation concerns, th
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Dow Jones Transportation Average
The Dow Jones Transportation Average
Dow Jones Transportation Average
(DJTA, also called the "Dow Jones Transports") is a U.S. stock market index from S&P Dow Jones Indices of the transportation sector, and is the most widely recognized gauge of the American transportation sector. It is the oldest stock index still in use, even older than its better-known relative, the Dow Jones Industrial Average
Dow Jones Industrial Average
(DJIA).[1]Contents1 Components 2 History 3 Use in Dow theory 4 Price history 5 Record values 6 Investing 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksComponents[edit] Dow Jones Transportation Average
Dow Jones Transportation Average
1896–2012The index is a running average of the stock prices of twenty transportation corporations, with each stock's price weighted to adjust for stock splits and other factors.[1] As a result, it can change at any time the markets are open
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S&P 500
The Standard & Poor's 500, often abbreviated as the S&P 500, or just the S&P,[6][7] is an American stock market index based on the market capitalizations of 500 large companies having common stock listed on the NYSE
NYSE
or NASDAQ. The S&P 500 index components and their weightings are determined by S&P Dow Jones Indices. It differs from other U.S. stock market indices, such as the Dow Jones Industrial Average
Dow Jones Industrial Average
or the Nasdaq Composite
Nasdaq Composite
index, because of its diverse constituency and weighting methodology. It is one of the most commonly followed equity indices, and many consider it one of the best representations of the U.S. stock market, and a bellwether for the U.S
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NASDAQ
The Nasdaq Stock
Stock
Market (/ˈnæzˌdæk/ ( listen)) is an American stock exchange
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