HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Frequentative
In grammar , a FREQUENTATIVE FORM (abbreviated FREQ or FR) of a word is one that indicates repeated action, but is not to be confused with iterative aspect . The frequentative form can be considered a separate but not completely independent word called a FREQUENTATIVE. The frequentative is no longer productive in English, but still is in some language groups, such as Finno-Ugric , Balto-Slavic , Turkic , etc. CONTENTS * 1 English * 2 Finnish * 3 Greek * 4 Hungarian * 5 Latin * 6 Lithuanian * 7 Polish * 8 Russian * 9 Turkish * 10 Reduplication * 11 See also * 12 References ENGLISHEnglish has -le and -er as frequentative suffixes . Some frequentative verbs surviving in English and their parent verbs are listed below. Additionally, some frequentative verbs are formed by reduplication of a monosyllable (e.g., coo-cooing, cf
[...More...]

"Frequentative" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Third Person Singular
GRAMMATICAL PERSON, in linguistics , is the grammatical distinction between deictic references to participant(s) in an event; typically the distinction is between the speaker (first person), the addressee (second person), and others (third person). Put in simple colloquial English, first person is that which includes the speaker, namely, "I," "we," "me," and "us," second person is the person or people spoken to, literally, "you," and third person includes all that is not listed above. Grammatical person typically defines a language's set of personal pronouns . It also frequently affects verbs , and sometimes nouns or possessive relationships
[...More...]

"Third Person Singular" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin Language
LATIN (Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
. The Latin alphabet is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets , and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet
Phoenician alphabet
. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium
Latium
, in the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
. Through the power of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire . Vulgar Latin developed into the Romance languages
Romance languages
, such as Italian , Portuguese , Spanish , French , and Romanian
[...More...]

"Latin Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lithuanian Language
LITHUANIAN (lietuvių kalba) is the official state language of Lithuania
Lithuania
and is recognized as one of the official languages of the European Union
European Union
. There are about 2.9 million native Lithuanian speakers in Lithuania
Lithuania
and about 200,000 abroad. Lithuanian is a Baltic language , related to Latvian . It is written in a Latin
Latin
alphabet . Lithuanian is often said to be the most conservative living Indo-European language , retaining many features of Proto-Indo-European now lost in other Indo-European languages
[...More...]

"Lithuanian Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Onomatopoeia
An ONOMATOPOEIA (/ˌɒnəˌmætəˈpiːə, -ˌmɑː-/ ( listen ), ; from the Greek ὀνοματοποιία; ὄνομα for "name" and ποιέω for "I make", adjectival form : "onomatopoeic" or "onomatopoetic") is a word that phonetically imitates, resembles or suggests the sound that it describes. As an uncountable noun , onomatopoeia refers to the property of such words. Common occurrences of onomatopoeia include animal noises such as "oink", "miaow" (or "meow"), "roar" and "chirp". Onomatopoeia
Onomatopoeia
can differ between languages: it conforms to some extent to the broader linguistic system; hence the sound of a clock may be expressed as tick tock in English , dī dā in Mandarin , or katchin katchin in Japanese , or "tik-tik" (टिक-टिक) in Hindi
[...More...]

"Onomatopoeia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Vowel Harmony
VOWEL HARMONY is a type of long-distance assimilatory phonological process involving vowels that occurs in some languages. A vowel or vowels in a word must be members of the same subclass (thus "in harmony"). In languages with vowel harmony, there are constraints on which vowels may be found near each other. Suffixes and prefixes will usually follow vowel harmony rules. Many agglutinative languages have vowel harmony
[...More...]

"Vowel Harmony" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Greek
The ANCIENT GREEK language includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
( Koine Greek
Koine Greek
, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek . The language of the Hellenistic phase is known as Koine (common). Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
Medieval Greek
. Prior to the Koine period, Greek of the classic and earlier periods included several regional dialects
[...More...]

"Ancient Greek" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin
LATIN (Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
. The Latin alphabet is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets , and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet
Phoenician alphabet
. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium
Latium
, in the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
. Through the power of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire . Vulgar Latin developed into the Romance languages
Romance languages
, such as Italian , Portuguese , Spanish , French , and Romanian
[...More...]

"Latin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Grammar
In linguistics , GRAMMAR (from Greek : γραμματική) is the set of structural rules governing the composition of clauses , phrases , and words in any given natural language . The term refers also to the study of such rules, and this field includes phonology , morphology , and syntax , often complemented by phonetics , semantics , and pragmatics . CONTENTS * 1 Use of the term * 2 Etymology * 3 History * 4 Development of grammars * 5 Grammar frameworks * 6 Education
Education
* 7 See also * 8 Notes * 9 References * 10 External links USE OF THE TERMFor linguists, grammar refers to cognitive information underlying language use. Speakers of a language have a set of internalized rules for using that language
[...More...]

"Grammar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latvian Language
LATVIAN (latviešu valoda ) is the official language of Latvia
Latvia
. It was previously known in English as LETTISH which remains the standard today in various forms in most other Germanic languages
Germanic languages
. There are about 1.3 million native Latvian speakers in Latvia
Latvia
and 100,000 abroad. Altogether, 2 million, or 80% of the population of Latvia, speak Latvian. Of those, 1.16 million or 56% use it as their primary language at home. The use of the Latvian language
Latvian language
in various areas of social life in Latvia
Latvia
is increasing. Latvian is a Baltic language and is most closely related to Lithuanian . In addition there is some disagreement whether Latgalian and New Curonian , which are mutually intelligible with Latvian, should be considered varieties or separate languages
[...More...]

"Latvian Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Samogitian Dialect
SAMOGITIAN (Samogitian: žemaitiu ruoda, žemaitiu kalba, žemaitiu rokunda, Lithuanian : žemaičių tarmė) is a dialect of the Lithuanian language
Lithuanian language
, considered a separate language by most linguists outside Lithuania, however, recognition as such is increasing in recent years, spoken mostly in Samogitia
Samogitia
(in the western part of Lithuania
Lithuania
), in Northern Europe
Northern Europe

[...More...]

"Samogitian Dialect" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Austronesian Languages
The AUSTRONESIAN LANGUAGES are a language family that is widely dispersed throughout Maritime Southeast Asia
Maritime Southeast Asia
, Madagascar
Madagascar
and the islands of the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
, with a few members in continental Asia . Austronesian languages are spoken by about 386 million people (4.9%), making it the fourth-largest language family by number of speakers, behind the Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
(46.3%), the Sino-Tibetan languages (20.4%), and the Niger-Congo languages
Niger-Congo languages
(6.9%). Major Austronesian languages with the highest number of speakers are Malay (Indonesian and Malaysian ), Javanese , and Filipino (Tagalog ). The family contains 1,257 languages, which is the second most of any language family
[...More...]

"Austronesian Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Turkish Language
Turkey
Turkey
(official), Northern Cyprus
Northern Cyprus
(official), Cyprus
[...More...]

"Turkish Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hunter
HUNTING is the practice of killing or trapping animals, or pursuing or tracking them with the intent of doing so. Hunting
Hunting
wildlife or feral animals is most commonly done by humans for food, recreation , to remove predators that are dangerous to humans or domestic animals, or for trade. Lawful hunting is distinguished from poaching , which is the illegal killing, trapping or capture of the hunted species. The species that are hunted are referred to as game or prey and are usually mammals and birds . Hunting
Hunting
can also be a means of pest control . Hunting
Hunting
advocates state that hunting can be a necessary component of modern wildlife management , for example, to help maintain a population of healthy animals within an environment's ecological carrying capacity when natural checks such as predators are absent or very rare
[...More...]

"Hunter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.