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French Revolutionary Army
The French Revolutionary Army
French Revolutionary Army
(French: Armée révolutionnaire française) was the French force that fought the French Revolutionary Wars from 1792 to 1802
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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L'ordre Profond
The ordre serré (close order) and the ordre profond (deep order) were two ways of grouping soldiers.Contents1 Historical background1.1 Ancient origins 1.2 Return of the ordre serré in the Renaissance 1.3 Industrial warfare2 Use of the ordre serré2.1 Concepts 2.2 Formations3 Commands in ordre serré3.1 Gather/disperse4 ReferencesHistorical background[edit] Ancient origins[edit] Historically, the ordre serré was the way of assembling soldiers in units during a battle or on the march. It is particular to infantry troops, originating in the Greek phalanx formation
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Minister Of War
The title Defence Minister, Minister for Defence, Minister of National Defense, Secretary of Defence, Secretary of State for Defense or some similar variation, is assigned to the person in a cabinet position in charge of a Ministry of Defence, which regulates the armed forces in sovereign states. The role of a defence minister varies considerably from country to country; in some the minister is only in charge of general budget matters and procurement of equipment; while in others the minister is also, in addition, an integral part of the operational military chain of command. Prior to the 20th century, there were in most countries separate ministerial posts for the land forces (often called "minister for war") and the naval forces. In the interwar period, some countries created a separate ministerial post in charge of the air forces
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Officer (armed Forces)
An officer is a member of an armed force or uniformed service who holds a position of authority. In its broadest sense, the term "officer" includes non-commissioned officers and warrant officers. However, when used without further detail, the term "officer" almost always refers to commissioned officers, the more senior portion of a force who derive their authority from a commission from the head of state of a sovereign nation-state.Contents1 Numbers 2 Legal relevance 3 Terminological details in the U.S. 4 Commissioned officers4.1 United Kingdom 4.2 United States4.2.1 Other U.S. officer commissioning programs, active and discontinued4.3 Commonwealth of Nations5 Non-commissioned officers 6 Warrant officers 7 Officer ranks and accommodation 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksNumbers[edit]An Indonesian army
Indonesian army
officer serving as a ceremonial field commanderThe proportion of officers varies greatly
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Non-commissioned Officer
A non-commissioned officer or noncommissioned officer (NCO, colloquially non-com or noncom) is a military officer who has not earned a commission.[1][2][3] Such is also called sub-officer in some countries. Non-commissioned officers, in the English-speaking world, usually obtain their position of authority by promotion through the enlisted ranks.[4] In contrast, commissioned officers hold higher ranks than NCOs, have more legal responsibilities, are paid more, and often have more non-military training such as a university diploma. Commissioned officers
Commissioned officers
usually earn their commissions without having risen through the enlisted ranks
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Seven Years' War
Anglo-Prusso-Portuguese coalition victoryTreaty of Saint Petersburg (1762) Treaty of Hamburg (1762) Treaty of Paris (1763) Treaty of Hubertusburg
Treaty of Hubertusburg
(1763)Territorial changes Status quo ante bellum in Europe. Transfer of colonial possessions between Great Britain, France, Spain, and Portugal.France cedes its possessions east of the Mississippi River, Canada (except Saint-Pierre and Miquelon), the island of Grenada, and the Northern Circars
Northern Circars
in India
India
to Great Britain. France cedes Louisiana
Louisiana
and its territory west of the Mississippi River to Spain. Spain
Spain
cedes Florida to Great Britain. Four "neutral" Caribbean
Caribbean
islands divided between Britain (St. Vincent, Tobago, Dominica) and France (St
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Jacques Antoine Hippolyte, Comte De Guibert
Jacques
Jacques
(French: [ʒak] ( listen), Quebec French pronunciation : [ʒɑɔ̯k] ( listen)) is the French equivalent of James, ultimately originating from the name Jacob. Jacques
Jacques
is derived from the Late Latin
Late Latin
Iacobus, from the Greek Ἰακώβος (Septuagintal Greek Ἰακώβ), from the Hebrew name Jacob
Jacob
יַעֲקֹב‬.[1] (See Jacob.) James is derived from Iacomus, a variant of Iacobus.[2] As a first name, Jacques
Jacques
is often phonetically converted to English as Jacob, Jake (from Jacob), or Jack. Jack, from Jankin, is usually a diminutive of John but it can be used also as a short form for many names derived from "Jacob" like "Jacques"
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Pierre-Joseph Bourcet
Pierre-Joseph Bourcet
Pierre-Joseph Bourcet
(1 March 1700 – 14 October 1780) was a French tactician, general, chief of staff, mapmaker and military educator. He was the son of Daniel-André Bourcet and of Marie-Magdeleine Legier.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Bourcet was born at Usseaux, in what is now Piedmont, northern Italy. At 18 years old, he began serving under his father, a captain in the French armies in the Alps. He completed his training, studying maths, and became a gunner before entering the infantry and finally the engineers. With the support of M. d'Asfeld, he joined the engineers corps in 1729. A long military career followed, ending at the rank of lieutenant-général des armées du roi, in 1762, the highest rank in the ancien régime military. At the start of his career, he was a protégé of the maréchal de Maillebois, accompanying him on a secret reconnaissance mission to France's Alpine frontier
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Mountain Warfare
Mountain
Mountain
warfare refers to warfare in the mountains or similarly rough terrain. This type of warfare is also called Alpine warfare, after the Alps
Alps
mountains. Mountain
Mountain
warfare is one of the most dangerous types of combat as it involves surviving not only combat with the enemy but also the extreme weather and dangerous terrain. Mountain
Mountain
ranges are of strategic importance since they often act as a natural border, and may also be the origin of a water source (e.g. Golan Heights
Golan Heights
– water conflict)
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Baron Le Mesnil-Durand
François Jean de Graindorge d'Orgeville, baron de Mesnil-Durand, known as François-Jean de Mesnil-Durand (1 September 1736, Mesnil-Durand - 13 thermidor year VII, i.e. 31 July 1799, London) was a French tactician. He collaborated with marshal de Broglie and supported the ordre profond. Works[edit]Projet d'un ordre françois en tactique, ou la phalange coupée et doublée soutenue par le mélange des armes (1755), printed by Antoine Boudet, Paris. 1 vol. in-4° (xxix, + 446p. + 16 plates) Fragments de tactique, ou six mémoires,... précédé d'un Discours Préliminaire sur la Tactique et sur les Systêmes (1774), libr. Ch.-Ant. Ambert, Paris. 2 vol. in-4° : lxviii + 420pp., et viii p.+144pp.+12 plates.Sources[edit]Louis du Bois - Notice sur Charles Graindorge d'Orgeville, Baron de Ménil-Durand in Almanach de la ville et de l'arrondissement de Lisieux pour 1839
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Tactical Column
A military column is a formation of soldiers marching together in one or more files in which the file is significantly longer than the width of ranks in the formation
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French First Republic
In the history of France, the First Republic
Republic
(French: Première République), officially the French Republic
Republic
(République française), was founded on 22 September 1792 during the French Revolution. The First Republic
Republic
lasted until the declaration of the First Empire in 1804 under Napoleon, although the form of the government changed several times
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Bayonet
A bayonet (from French baïonnette) is a bladed weapon similar to a knife or short sword, or spike-shaped weapon designed to fit in, on, over or underneath the muzzle of a rifle, musket or similar firearm, augmenting the firearm to allow use as a pike.[1] Starting in the 17th century, it was a weapon of primary importance for infantry attacks, even up to World War II, but more a weapon of last resort since then. In this regard, it is an ancillary close-quarter combat weapon
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Victor-François, 2nd Duc De Broglie
Victor François de Broglie, 2nd duc de Broglie (19 October 1718 – 30 March 1804) was a French aristocrat and soldier and a marshal of France. He served with his father, François-Marie, 1st duc de Broglie, at Parma and Guastalla, and in 1734 obtained a colonelcy.[1] In the War of the Austrian Succession
War of the Austrian Succession
he took part in the storming of Prague
Prague
in 1742, and was made a brigadier. In 1744 and 1745 he saw further service on the Rhine, and he succeeded his father as 2nd duc de Broglie on the old duke's death in 1745. He was made a Maréchal de Camp, and he subsequently served with Marshal de Saxe in the Low Countries, and was present at Roucoux, Val and Maastricht
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