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French Republic
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Lafrance (other)
Lafrance, LaFrance, la France
France
and other variations may refer to:Contents1 Places 2 People 3 Other uses 4 See alsoPlaces[edit]France, a country Pont-Lafrance, New Brunswick, Canada, a former municipality which is now part of Grand Tracadie–Sheila La France, South Carolina, United States Maison Lafrance, New Brunswick, Canada, a residence at the University of Moncton La France
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List Of Presidents Of The Senate Of France
The French senate
French senate
is the upper house of the French Parliament. It is presided over by a president. Although there had been Senates in both the First and Second Empires, these had not technically been legislative bodies, but rather advisory bodies on the model of the Roman Senate. France's first experience with an upper house was under the Directory from 1795 to 1799, when the Council of Ancients
Council of Ancients
was the upper chamber. With the Restoration in 1814, a new Chamber of Peers was created, on the model of the British House of Lords. At first it contained hereditary peers, but following the July Revolution
July Revolution
of 1830, it became a body to which one was appointed for life
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Muslim
65–75% Sunni
Sunni
Islam[22][note 1] 10–13% Shia
Shia
Islam[22] 15–20% Non-denominational Islam[23] ~1% Ahmadiyya[24] ~1% Other Muslim
Muslim
traditions, e.g
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Judaism
Judaism
Judaism
(originally from Hebrew יהודה‬, Yehudah, "Judah";[1][2] via Latin
Latin
and Greek) is an ancient, monotheistic, Abrahamic religion with the Torah
Torah
as its foundational text.[3] It encompasses the religion, philosophy and culture of the Jewish people.[4] Judaism
Judaism
is considered by religious Jews
Jews
to be the expression of the covenant that God
God
established with the Children of Israel.[5] Judaism
Judaism
includes a wide corpus of texts, practices, theological positions, and forms of organization. The Torah
Torah
is part of the larger text known as the Tanakh or the Hebrew Bible, and supplemental oral tradition represented by later texts such as the Midrash
Midrash
and the Talmud
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Demonym
A demonym (/ˈdɛmənɪm/; δῆμος dẽmos "people, tribe", ὄόνομα ónoma "name") is a word that identifies residents or natives of a particular place, which is derived from the name of that particular place.[1] It is a neologism (i.e., a recently minted term); previously gentilic was recorded in English dictionaries, e.g., the Oxford
Oxford
English Dictionary and Chambers Twentieth Century Dictionary.[2][3][4] Examples of demonyms include Swahili for a person of the Swahili coast and Cochabambino for a person from the city of Cochabamba. Demonyms do not always clearly distinguish place of origin or ethnicity from place of residence or citizenship, and many demonyms overlap with the ethnonym for the ethnically dominant group of a region
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France (other)
France
France
is a country in western Europe. France
France
may also refer to:Contents1 Film and television 2 Radio 3 Transportation 4 Other uses 5 See alsoFilm and television[edit]
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Unitary State
A unitary state is a state governed as a single power in which the central government is ultimately supreme and any administrative divisions (sub-national units) exercise only the powers that the central government chooses to delegate. The majority of states in the world have a unitary system of government. Of the 193 UN member states, 165 are governed as unitary states. In a unitary state, sub-national units are created and abolished (an example being the 22 mainland regions of France
France
being merged into 13), and their powers may be broadened and narrowed, by the central government. Although political power may be delegated through devolution to local governments by statute, the central government remains supreme; it may abrogate the acts of devolved governments or curtail their powers. The United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
is an example of a unitary state
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Semi-presidential System
A semi-presidential system is a system of government in which a president exists alongside a prime minister and a cabinet, with the latter two being responsible to the legislature of a state
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Gérard Larcher
Gérard Philippe René André Larcher (born 14 September 1949) is a French politician who has been President of the Senate of France
Senate of France
since 2014. He previously served in the same post from 2008 to 2011. A member of the center-right The Republicans, he was a Senator for the Yvelines
Yvelines
department from 1986 to 2004 and has been again since 2007.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Political career1.2.1 Local mandates 1.2.2 Government minister 1.2.3 President of the Senate2 Political career 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Gérard Larcher
Gérard Larcher
was born in Flers, Orne
Flers, Orne
to a Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
family
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Christian
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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List Of Presidents Of The National Assembly Of France
This article lists Presidents of the French Parliament
French Parliament
or, as the case may be, of its lower chamber. The National Constituent Assembly was created in 1789 out of the Estates-General. It, and the revolutionary legislative assemblies that followed – the Legislative Assembly (1791–1792) and the National Convention (1792–1795), had a quickly rotating Presidency. With the establishment of the Directory in 1795, there were two chambers of the French legislature. The lower, the Council of Five Hundred, also had a quickly rotating chairmanship. Under Napoleon I, the Legislative Corps had all authority to actually enact laws, but was essentially a rubberstamp body, lacking the power to debate legislation. With the restoration of the monarchy, a bicameral system was restored, with a Chamber of Peers and a Chamber of Deputies
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François De Rugy
François
François
(French pronunciation: ​[fʁɑ̃.swɑ]) is a French masculine given name and surname, equivalent to the English name Francis. People with the given name[edit]Francis I of France, King of France
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Upper House
An upper house, sometimes called a senate, is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature (or one of three chambers of a tricameral legislature), the other chamber being the lower house.[1] The house formally designated as the upper house is usually smaller and often has more restricted power than the lower house
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Lower House
A lower house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the upper house.[1] Despite its official position "below" the upper house, in many legislatures worldwide, the lower house has come to wield more power. The lower house typically is the more numerous of the two chambers
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Francia
Francia, also called the Kingdom of the Franks
Franks
(Latin: Regnum Francorum), or Frankish Empire
Empire
was the largest post-Roman Barbarian kingdom in Western Europe. It was ruled by the Franks
Franks
during Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. The core Frankish territories inside the Roman empire
Roman empire
were close to the Rhine
Rhine
and Maas rivers in the north. After a period where small kingdoms inter-acted with the remaining Gallo-Roman institutions to their south, a single kingdom uniting them was founded by Clovis I
Clovis I
who was crowned King of the Franks
Franks
in 496
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