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French Fries
French fries
French fries
(North American English), chips (British and Commonwealth English),[1] finger chips (Indian English),[2] or French-fried potatoes are batonnet or allumette-cut deep-fried potatoes. In the United States
United States
and most of Canada, the term fries refers to all dishes of fried elongated pieces of potatoes, while in the United Kingdom, Australia, South Africa
South Africa
(rarely), Ireland
Ireland
and New Zealand, thinly cut fried potatoes are sometimes called shoestring fries or skinny fries to distinguish them from chips, which are cut thicker. French fries
French fries
are served hot, either soft or crispy, and are generally eaten as part of lunch or dinner or by themselves as a snack, and they commonly appear on the menus of diners, fast food restaurants, pubs, and bars
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Fries (other)
Fries, or french fries, are strips of deep-fried potato. Fries or FRIES may also refer to:Fries (surname), including list of people with the name Frisian languages
Frisian languages
(Dutch: Fries), languages spoken in Friesland (Netherlands) and East Friesland (Germany) Fast Rope Insertion Extraction System, or fast-roping, a technique for descending a thick rope Lamb fries, lamb testicles used as food A form of the verb "to fry": see frying Home fries
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Onion Ring
Onion
Onion
rings are a form of appetizer or side dish commonly found in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa
South Africa
and some parts of Asia
Asia
and Continental Europe. They generally consist of a cross-sectional "ring" of onion (the circular structure of which lends itself well to this method of preparation) dipped in batter or bread crumbs and then deep fried; a variant is made with onion paste. Onion
Onion
rings are sometimes accompanied by condiments including ketchup, mayonnaise or other sauces. While typically served as a side dish, onion rings can also be eaten on their own
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Vacuum Fryer
A vacuum fryer is a deep-frying device housed inside a vacuum chamber. Vacuum
Vacuum
fryers are fit to process low-quality potatoes that contain higher sugar levels than normal, as they frequently have to be processed in spring and early summer before the potatoes from the new harvest become available. With vacuum frying it is easier to maintain natural colors and flavours of the finished product. Due to the lower temperatures applied (approx. 130 °C (266 °F)), the formation of suspected carcinogen acrylamide is significantly lower than in standard atmospheric fryers, where the frying temperature is approx. 170 °C (338 °F). The fat absorption of the products is also reported to be lower than in atmospheric fryers. In South East Asia (mainly Philippines, Thailand, China
China
and Indonesia) batch type vacuum fryers are mainly used for the production of fruit chips
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Chip Pan
A chip pan is a deep-sided cooking pan used for deep-frying. Chip pans are named for their traditional use in frying chips (called "French fries" in the USA) . Today, they are made from either aluminium or stainless steel, although in the past were commonly made from cast iron. A basket is placed inside the pan, to lower the chips into the hot cooking oil, and to raise them once cooked. Chip pans are commonly used in the United Kingdom, although are slowly being outmoded by deep fryers.[1]Contents1 Manufacture 2 Health issues 3 Oil burns 4 Fire
Fire
hazard 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksManufacture[edit] Chip pans are commonly manufactured through a spinning process, as the metal used is malleable
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Vegetable Oil
A vegetable oil is a triglyceride extracted from a plant.[1] The term "vegetable oil" can be narrowly defined as referring only to plant oils that are liquid at room temperature,[2] or broadly defined without regard to a substance's state of matter at a given temperature.[3] For this reason, vegetable oils that are solid at room temperature are sometimes called vegetable fats
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Suet
Suet
Suet
is the raw, hard fat of beef or mutton found around the loins and kidneys. Suet
Suet
has a melting point of between 45 °C and 50 °C (113 °F and 122 °F) and congelation between 37 °C and 40 °C (98.6 °F and 104 °F). Its high smoke point makes it ideal for deep frying and pastry production. The primary use of suet is to make tallow, although it is also used as an ingredient in cooking, especially in traditional puddings, such as British Christmas pudding. Suet
Suet
is made into tallow in a process called rendering, which involves melting and extended simmering, followed by straining, cooling and usually by repeating the entire process
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Vegetable Shortening
Shortening
Shortening
is any fat that is a solid at room temperature and used to make crumbly pastry and other food products. Although butter is solid at room temperature and is frequently used in making pastry, the term "shortening" seldom refers to butter, but is more closely related to margarine.Contents1 History and market 2 Shortened dough 3 Health concerns and reformulation 4 References 5 BibliographyHistory and market[edit]A 1918 advertisement for shorteningOriginally shortening was synonymous with lard, but with the invention of margarine by French chemist Hippolyte Mège-Mouriès
Hippolyte Mège-Mouriès
in 1869, margarine also came to be included in the term. Since the invention of hydrogenated vegetable oil in the early 20th century, "shortening" has come almost exclusively to mean hydrogenated vegetable oil
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McDonald's
corporate.mcdonalds.com/mcd.html www.mcdonalds.com/us/en-us.html This box:view talk edit McDonald's
McDonald's
is an American fast food company, founded in 1940 as a restaurant operated by Richard and Maurice McDonald, in San Bernardino, California, United States. They rechristened their business as a hamburger stand. The first time a McDonald's
McDonald's
franchise used the Golden Arches
Golden Arches
logo was in 1953 at a location in Phoenix, Arizona. In 1955, Ray Kroc, a businessman, joined the company as a franchise agent and proceeded to purchase the chain from the McDonald brothers
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Tallow
Tallow
Tallow
is a rendered form of beef or mutton fat, and is primarily made up of triglycerides. It is solid at room temperature. Unlike suet, tallow can be stored for extended periods without the need for refrigeration to prevent decomposition, provided it is kept in an airtight container to prevent oxidation. In industry, tallow is not strictly defined as beef or mutton fat. In this context, tallow is animal fat that conforms to certain technical criteria, including its melting point. It is common for commercial tallow to contain fat derived from other animals, such as lard from pigs, or even from plant sources. Tallow
Tallow
consists mainly of triglycerides (fat), whose major constituents are derived from stearic and oleic acids.The adjacent diagram shows the chemical structure of a typical triglyceride molecule
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Cottonseed Oil
Cottonseed
Cottonseed
oil is a cooking oil extracted from the seeds of cotton plants of various species, mainly Gossypium hirsutum
Gossypium hirsutum
and Gossypium herbaceum, that are grown for cotton fiber, animal feed, and oil.[1] Cotton seed has a similar structure to other oilseeds such as sunflower seed, having an oil-bearing kernel surrounded by a hard outer hull; in processing, the oil is extracted from the kernel. Cottonseed
Cottonseed
oil is used for salad oil, mayonnaise, salad dressing, and similar products because of its flavor stability.[2]Contents1 Composition1.1 Comparison to other vegetable oils2 Physical properties 3 Economic History 4 Use in food 5 Use as insecticide 6 References 7 External linksComposition[edit]Mississippi Cottonseed
Cottonseed
Oil
Oil
Co
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Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
(April 13 [O.S. April 2] 1743 – July 4, 1826) was an American Founding Father who was the principal author of the Declaration of Independence and later served as the third President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1801 to 1809. Previously, he was elected the second Vice President of the United States, serving under John Adams
John Adams
from 1797 to 1801. A proponent of democracy, republicanism, and individual rights motivating American colonists to break from Great Britain and form a new nation, he produced formative documents and decisions at both the state and national level. He was a land owner and farmer. Jefferson was primarily of English ancestry, born and educated in colonial Virginia. He graduated from the College of William & Mary and briefly practiced law, at times defending slaves seeking their freedom
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Chicken (food)
Chicken
Chicken
is the most common type of poultry in the world.[1] In developed countries, chickens are typically subject to intensive farming methods.Contents1 History 2 Breeding 3 Edible components 4 Health4.1 Use of Roxarsone

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Kumara
Kumara may refer to: Places[edit]Kumara, New Zealand, a town Kumara (New Zealand electorate), a Parliamentary electorateOther uses[edit]Kumara Illangasinghe, an Anglican bishop in Sri Lanka Kumara (surname) The Four Kumaras, sages from the Hindu tradition Sweet potato, called kumara in New Zealand Kumara (plant), two plant species from South Africa related to Aloe A Hindu god and general, also named KartikeyaThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Kumara. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Frietsaus
Fritessaus
Fritessaus
or frietsaus ("fries sauce") is a Dutch accompaniment to French fries, served popularly nationwide.[1] It is similar to mayonnaise, but with at most 25% fat, is leaner and usually sweeter than mayonnaise.[2] Mayonnaise
Mayonnaise
in the Netherlands
Netherlands
is required by the Warenwet (Wares law) of 1998 to contain at least 70% fat and at least 5% egg yolk before it may be called mayonnaise.[3] See also[edit]List of dips List of saucesReferences[edit]^ John B. Roney (2009). Culture and Customs of the Netherlands. ABC-CLIO, LLC. p. 133. ISBN 978-0-313-34808-2. Retrieved 21 May 2012.  ^ "Afslanktips en vetverbranding"
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Curry Ketchup
Curry
Curry
ketchup, also called Currygewürzketchup (curry spice ketchup) in Germany, is a spiced variant on ketchup and a common sauce in Belgium, Germany, Denmark
Denmark
and the Netherlands. It is typically served on prepared meats such as frikandel, or on French fries.[1] In Germany, it is the basis of the dish currywurst, one of the most popular in the country. Typically with currywurst, additional curry powder is sprinkled on top of the curry ketchup. Major brands producing curry ketchup include Zeisner,[2] Heinz, Hela, and Knorr.[1]Currywurst, Berliner style. The red sauce is curry ketchup with additional curry powder sprinkled on top.References[edit]^ a b Emily Ho (June 17, 2009). " Ketchup
Ketchup
With a Kick: Add Curry Powder!". Retrieved April 20, 2011.  ^ " Curry
Curry
Ketchup
Ketchup
Zeisner" (in Dutch). Zeisner.be
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