HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

French Canadian
French Canadians
Canadians
(also referred to as Franco- Canadians
Canadians
or Canadiens; French: Canadien(ne)s français(es)) are an ethnic group who trace their ancestry to French colonists who settled in Canada
Canada
from the 17th century onward. Today, French Canadians
Canadians
constitute the main French-speaking population in Canada, accounting for about 22% of the total population.[2] During the mid-18th century, Canadian colonists born in French Canada expanded across North America
North America
and colonized various regions, cities, and towns;[3] the French Canadian settlers originated primarily from districts in the west of France, such as Normandy, Perche, Beauce, Maine, Anjou, Touraine, Poitou, Aunis, Angoumois, Saintonge
Saintonge
and Gascony.[4] Today, French Canadians
Canadians
live across North America
[...More...]

"French Canadian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anjou
Anjou
Anjou
(French pronunciation: ​[ɑ̃ʒu]; Latin: Andegavia) is a historical province of France straddling the lower Loire River. Its capital was Angers
Angers
and it was roughly coextensive with the diocese of Angers. It bordered Brittany
Brittany
to the west, Maine to the north, Touraine to the east and Poitou
Poitou
to the south. The adjectival form of Anjou
Anjou
is Angevin and inhabitants of Anjou
Anjou
are known as Angevins. During the Middle Ages, the county of Anjou
Anjou
was a prominent fief of the French crown. The region takes its name from the Celtic tribe of the Andecavi, who submitted to Roman rule following the Gallic Wars. Under the Romans, the chief fortified settlement of the Andecavi
Andecavi
became the city of Juliomagus, the future Angers
[...More...]

"Anjou" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
[...More...]

"Catholic Church" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Maine (province)
Maine
Maine
[mɛːn] is one of the traditional provinces of France (not to be confused with La Maine, the river). It corresponds to the former County of Maine, whose capital was also the city of Le Mans. The area, now divided into the departments of Sarthe
Sarthe
and Mayenne, counts about 857,000 inhabitants.Contents1 History1.1 French Revolution 1.2 Modern times2 Gallery 3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksHistory[edit] In the 8th and 9th centuries there existed a Duchy of Cénomannie (ducatus Cenomannicus), which several of the Carolingian kings used as an appanage. This duchy was a march that may have included several counties including Maine, and extended into Lower Normandy, all the way to the Seine. In 748, Pepin the Short, then Mayor of the Palace and thus the most powerful man in Francia after the king, gave this duchy to his half-brother Grifo
[...More...]

"Maine (province)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Beauce
Beauce
Beauce
is a natural region in northern France, located between the Seine
Seine
and Loire rivers. It now comprises the Eure-et-Loir
Eure-et-Loir
département and parts of Loiret, Essonne
Essonne
and Loir-et-Cher. The region shared the history of the province of Orléanais
Orléanais
and the county of Chartres, which is its only major city. Beauce
Beauce
is one of France's most productive agricultural areas. It is the setting of Émile Zola's novel, La Terre
La Terre
(The Earth). References[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Beauce.Coordinates: 48°12′N 1°42′E / 48.2°N 1.7°E / 48.2; 1.7This article related to geography of France
France
is a stub
[...More...]

"Beauce" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Normandy
Normandy
Normandy
(/ˈnɔːrməndi/; French: Normandie, pronounced [nɔʁmɑ̃di] ( listen), Norman: Normaundie, from Old French
Old French
Normanz, plural of Normant, originally from the word for "northman" in several Scandinavian languages)[2] is one of the 18 regions of France, roughly corresponding to the historical Duchy of Normandy. Administratively, Normandy
Normandy
is divided into five départements: Calvados, Eure, Manche, Orne, and Seine-Maritime. It covers 30,627 square kilometres (11,825 sq mi),[3] comprising roughly 5% of the territory of metropolitan France
[...More...]

"Normandy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Canada (New France)
Canada
Canada
was a French colony within New France
New France
first claimed in the name of the King of France in 1535 during the second voyage of Jacques Cartier.[1][2][3][4] The word "Canada" at this point referred to the territory along the Saint Lawrence River,[5] then known as the Canada river, from Grosse Island in the east to a point between Quebec
Quebec
and Three Rivers,[6] although this territory had greatly expanded by 1600. French explorations continued "unto the Countreys of Canada, Hochelaga, and Saguenay"[7] before any permanent settlements were established
[...More...]

"Canada (New France)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

French Language
French (le français [lə fʁɑ̃sɛ] ( listen) or la langue française [la lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French has evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin
Latin
in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France
France
and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages
Celtic languages
of Northern Roman Gaul
Gaul
like Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders
[...More...]

"French Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Brayon
Brayons are a francophone people inhabiting the area in and around Edmundston, New Brunswick, Canada. In French, they are called les Brayons or feminine les Brayonnes, and both terms are also used as adjectives, as in Brayon
Brayon
culture, or la culture brayonne. Given their location in New Brunswick, a Canadian Maritime province, they are considered by many to be Acadians; however most residents relate more to Quebec and the majority have strong roots and ancestral ties to Quebec as compared to Acadia, considering that at one point the Madawaska region was considered part of Quebec. The Brayons view themselves as neither Acadian
Acadian
nor Québécois, affirming that they are a distinctive culture with a history and heritage linked to farming and forestry in the Madawaska area, unlike both the primarily maritime heritage of the modern Acadians
Acadians
and the St. Lawrence Valley
St

[...More...]

"Brayon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Poitou
Poitou
Poitou
(French pronunciation: ​[pwatu]), in Poitevin: Poetou, was a province of west-central France whose capital city was Poitiers.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Culture 4 In fiction 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksGeography[edit] The main historical cities are Poitiers
[...More...]

"Poitou" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aunis
Aunis
Aunis
is a historical province of France, situated in the north-west of the department of Charente-Maritime. Its historic capital is La Rochelle, which took over from Castrum Allionis (Châtelaillon) the historic capital which gives its name to the province. It was a fief of the Duchy of Aquitaine. It extended to Marais Poitevin in the north, Basse Saintonge
Saintonge
(and Niortais) in the east, and Rochefortais in the south. Aunis
Aunis
had an influence approximately 20–25 km into the Isle of Ré (l'Île de Ré). The province was officially recognised during the reign of Charles V of France in 1374: "In 1374, Charles V separated La Rochelle
La Rochelle
from Saintonge
Saintonge
to set up a provincial government, comprising the jurisdictions of Rochefort, Marennes and, for a time, Benon
[...More...]

"Aunis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Angoumois
Angoumois
Angoumois
(French pronunciation: ​[ɑ̃ɡumwa]) or equally historically the comté d' Angoulême
Angoulême
was a county and province of France, originally inferior to the parent duchy of Aquitaine, similar to the Périgord
Périgord
to its east but lower and generally less forested, equally with occasional vineyards throughout. Its capital was Angoulême
Angoulême
with its citadel and castle above the River Charente. It almost corresponds to the Charente
Charente
Department which also takes in the east of the coastal comté de Saintonge.[1] History[edit] See also: Duchy of Aquitaine This area was a county and province of France, originally inferior to the parent duchy of Aquitaine, similar to the Périgord
Périgord
to its east. Many of the historic churches and castles, or castle ruins in the county, survive
[...More...]

"Angoumois" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Saintonge
Saintonge
Saintonge
(French pronunciation: ​[sɛ̃tɔ̃ʒ]), historically spelled Xaintonge and Xainctonge, is a former province of France located on the west central Atlantic coast. The capital city was Saintes (Xaintes, Xainctes). Other principal towns include Saint-Jean-d'Angély, Jonzac, Frontenay-Rohan-Rohan, Royan, Marennes, Pons, and Barbezieux-Saint-Hilaire. The borders of the province slightly shifted through history, and some mapmakers, such as Nicolas Sanson (1650), Johannes Blaeu
Johannes Blaeu
(1662), and Bernard Antoine Jaillot (1733), show it extending into Cognac, traditionally part of Angoumois, and to the parishes of Braud-et-Saint-Louis
Braud-et-Saint-Louis
and Étauliers, part of the Pays Gabay on the right bank of the Gironde River. Today, four fifths of the historical Saintonge
Saintonge
province occupies the modern département of Charente-Maritime
[...More...]

"Saintonge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bretons
The Bretons
Bretons
(Breton: Bretoned, Breton pronunciation: [breˈtɔ̃nɛt]) are an ethnic group located in the region of Brittany
Brittany
in France. They trace much of their heritage to groups of Brittonic speakers who immigrated from southwestern Great Britain, particularly Cornwall
Cornwall
and Devon, to expand their territory onto the continent. They also descend in some parts from Vikings. They migrated in waves from the 3rd to 9th century (most heavily from 450–600) into Armorica, which was subsequently named Brittany
Brittany
after them.[7] The main traditional language of Brittany
Brittany
is Breton (Brezhoneg), spoken in Lower Brittany
Brittany
(i.e
[...More...]

"Bretons" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gascony
Gascony (/ˈɡæskəni/; French: Gascogne [ɡaskɔɲ]; Gascon: Gasconha [ɡasˈkuɲɔ]; Basque: Gaskoinia) is an area of southwest France that was part of the "Province of Guyenne and Gascony" prior to the French Revolution. The region is vaguely defined, and the distinction between Guyenne and Gascony is unclear; by some they are seen to overlap, while others consider Gascony a part of Guyenne. Most definitions put Gascony east and south of Bordeaux. It is currently divided between the region of Nouvelle-Aquitaine (departments of Landes, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, southwestern Gironde, and southern Lot-et-Garonne) and the region of Occitanie (departments of Gers, Hautes-Pyrénées, southwestern Tarn-et-Garonne, and western Haute-Garonne). Gascony was historically inhabited by Basque-related people who appear to have spoken a language similar to Basque. The name Gascony comes from the same root as the word Basque (see Wasconia below)
[...More...]

"Gascony" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Touraine
Touraine
Touraine
(French pronunciation: ​[tuʁɛn]) is one of the traditional provinces of France. Its capital was Tours. During the political reorganization of French territory in 1790, Touraine
Touraine
was divided between the departments of Indre-et-Loire, Loir-et-Cher
Loir-et-Cher
and Indre.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Sights 4 Famous natives 5 Famous non-natives 6 Twin towns 7 See also 8 External linksGeography[edit] Traversed by the Loire and its tributaries the Cher, the Indre
Indre
and the Vienne, Touraine
Touraine
makes up a part of the Paris Basin. It is well known for its viticulture
[...More...]

"Touraine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.