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French Army
The French Army, officially the Ground Army
Army
(French: Armée de terre [aʀme də tɛʀ]) (to distinguish it from the French Air Force, Armée de L'air or Air Army) is the land-based and largest component of the French Armed Forces. It is responsible to the Government of France, along with the other four components of the Armed Forces. The current Chief of Staff of the French Army
Chief of Staff of the French Army
(CEMAT) is General Jean-Pierre Bosser, a direct subordinate of the Chief of the Defence Staff (CEMA). General Bosser is also responsible, in part, to the Ministry of the Armed Forces for organization, preparation, use of forces, as well as planning and programming, equipment and Army
Army
future acquisitions
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President Of France
The President of the French Republic (French: Président de la République française, French pronunciation: ​[pʁezidɑ̃ də la ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is the executive head of state of France
France
in the French Fifth Republic. In French terms, the presidency is the supreme magistracy of the country. The powers, functions and duties of prior presidential offices, and their relation with the Prime Minister and Cabinet, have over time differed with the various French constitutions since 1848 (the final end of the French Monarchy). The President of the French Republic is also the ex officio Co-Prince of Andorra, Grand Master of the Légion d'honneur and the Ordre national du Mérite, and honorary proto-canon of the Basilica of St. John Lateran
Basilica of St

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Second Ivorian Civil War
The Second Ivorian Civil War[10][11] broke out in March 2011 when the crisis in Ivory Coast
Ivory Coast
escalated into full-scale military conflict between forces loyal to Laurent Gbagbo, the President of Ivory Coast since 2000, and supporters of the internationally recognised president-elect Alassane Ouattara. After months of unsuccessful negotiations and sporadic violence between supporters of the two sides, the crisis entered a critical stage as Ouattara's forces seized control of most of the country with the help of the UNO, with Gbagbo entrenched in Abidjan, the country's largest city. International organizations have reported numerous instances of human rights violations by both sides, in particular in the city of Duékoué
Duékoué
where Ouattara's forces killed hundreds of people. Overall casualties of the war are estimated around 3000
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Lebanese Civil War
Lebanese Front Army of Free Lebanon
Lebanon
(until 1977) SLA (from 1976)   Israel
Israel
(from 1978) Tigers Militia
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Global War On Terrorism
NATO-led international involvement in Afghanistan
Afghanistan
(2001–2014)Fall of the Taliban
Taliban
government in Afghanistan Destruction of al-Qaeda camps Taliban
Taliban
insurgency War in North-West Pakistan Killing of Osama bin Laden War in Afghanistan
Afghanistan
(2015–present)Initiation of Operation Resolute Support by NATO Transfer of combat roles to Afghan Armed Forces U.S.– Afghanistan
Afghanistan
Strategic Partnership Agreement Insurgency
Insurgency
in Yemen
Yemen
(1992–2015):[note 2]Drone strikes being conducted by U.S
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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War In Afghanistan (1978–present)
OngoingCommunist coup (1978) Uprisings against PDPA
PDPA
government Soviet intervention (1979) Resistance against Soviet intervention Soviet withdrawal (1989) Collapse of the PDPA
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Operation Enduring Freedom
Conflict ongoing Taliban
Taliban
regime deposed, but their insurgency still fights NATO
NATO
and Afghan government forces
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War In Afghanistan (2001–present)
ISAF phase (2001–14): Islamic Republic of Afghanistan[7] ISAF  United States  United Kingdom  Italy  Germany  Georgia  Jordan  Turkey  Bulgaria  Poland  Romania  Spain  Australia  Czech RepublicContinued list[a] Macedonia  Denmark  Armenia  Azerbaijan  Finland  France  Croatia  Hungary  Norway  Lithuania  Mongolia  United Arab Emirates  Belgium  Portugal  Slovakia  Netherlands  Montenegro  Latvia  Sweden  Albania  Ukraine  Bosnia and Herzegovina  Greece  Ireland  Iceland  Estonia  Malaysia  Slovenia  Austria  Bahrain  El Salvador  Luxembourg  New Zealand  South Korea  Tonga Canada  Pakistan[8]  
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Second Italian War Of Independence
The Second Italian War of Independence, also called the Franco-Austrian War, Austro-Sardinian War or Italian War of 1859 (French: Campagne d'Italie),[3] was fought by the French Empire and the Kingdom of Sardinia
Kingdom of Sardinia
against the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
in 1859 and played a crucial part in the process of Italian unification.Contents1 Background 2 Forces 3 Operations 4 Peace 5 Timeline 6 References 7 Further readingBackground[edit] The Piedmontese, following their defeat by Austria in the First Italian War of Independence, recognised their need for allies. This led Camillo Benso, conte di Cavour, the prime minister of the Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia, to attempt to establish relations with other European powers, partially through Piedmont's participation in the Crimean War
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French Conquest Of Algeria
French victory Pacification of AlgeriaBelligerents Kingdom of France Ottoman EmpireRegency of Algiers Emirate of Abdelkader Kingdom of Ait Abbas Sultanate of Tuggurt Kel Ahaggar Support : Sultanate of MoroccoCommanders and leaders Bertrand Clausel Baron Berthezène Duke of Rovigo Baron Voirol Comte d'Erlon Comte Damrémont † Sylvain Valée Thomas Bugeaud Hussein Dey Ahmed Bey Emir Abdalkader Lalla Fatma N'Soumer Cheikh Mokrani Salaman IV Mohammed Ag Bessa Support : Abd al-Rahman of MoroccoStrengthInvasion force:34,000 troops, 83 guns 100 warships 11 ships-of-the-line 572 merchantmen[3]Ultimately: 160,000 troops[4]UnknownCasualties and losses150,000-200,000 military[5][6][7][8][9] More than 480,000 killed (civilian and soldiers).[10] Unknown [11][12][13][14]v t eFrench conquest of AlgeriaAlgiers Staouéli Macta Sikkak 1st Co
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Greek War Of Independence
Greek independenceEstablishment of the First Hellenic Republic
First Hellenic Republic
(1822–1832) London Protocol Treaty of Constantinople Establishment of the Kingdom of Greece
Greece
(1832)Territorial changes The Peloponnese, Saronic Isla
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Hundred Thousand Sons Of Saint Louis
The Hundred Thousand Sons of Saint Louis
Hundred Thousand Sons of Saint Louis
was the popular name for a French army mobilized in 1823 by the Bourbon King of France, Louis XVIII to help the Spanish Royalists restore King Ferdinand VII of Spain
Spain
to the absolute power of which he had been deprived during the Liberal Triennium
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Central African Republic Conflict Under The Djotodia Administration
Resignation of President Michel Djotodia and replacement by caretaker Alexandre-Ferdinand Nguendet Resignation of Prime Minister Nicolas Tiangaye Catherine Samba-Panza appointed interim president by the CNT, leadership accepted by both sides André Nzapayeké appointed as prime minister Continued sectarian conflictBelligerents Central African Republic: Séléka (Muslim militia)CPJP CPSK FDPC FPR UFDRAnti-balaka militiaMRPRCPro-Bozizé militias Other Christian militias[1] MISCA[2][3] Chad  Republic of Congo  Democratic Republic of Congo  Burundi[4]  Gabon France[5][6]  United Kingdom (support) Africom (logistics)[7]Commanders and leaders Michel Djotodia Nicolas Tiangaye Levy Yakete François Bozizé Alexandre-Ferdinand Nguendet François Hollande Jean-Yves Le DrianCasualties and losses8 killed[8][9] Unknown2 soldiers killed[10]6 peacekee
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War Of The Polish Succession
Treaty of ViennaAugustus III ascends the throne Bourbon territorial gainsBelligerents Poland loyal to Stanisław I  France Spain  Kingdom of Sardinia  Duchy of Parma Poland loyal to Augustus III  Russian Empire  Holy Roman Empire Austria  Saxony  PrussiaCommanders and leaders Duke of Parma Duke of Fitz-James  † Duke of Villars King Charles Emmanuel III Peter Lacy Burkhard Christoph von Münnich Eugene of Savoy Friedrich Heinrich von SeckendorffCasualties and losses50,400 French killed and wounded 3,000 Spanish killed and wounded 7,200 Sardinians killed and wounded[1] 3,000 Russians killed and wounded 32,000 Austrians killed and wounded 1,800 Prussians killed and wounded[2]v t ePolish–Russian WarsMuscovite/Lithuanian Livonian 1605–18 (Dymitriads) Smolensk 1654–67 War of the Polish Succession War of the Bar Confederation 1792 Kościuszko Uprisi
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Hundred Years' War
House of Valois Kingdom of France Duchy of Burgundy[1] Duchy of Brittany[2] (County of Flanders)*[3] Kingdom of Scotland Kingdom of Bohemia Duchy of Lorraine Republic of Genoa Crown of Castile Crown of Aragon Kingdom of Majorca Avignon Papacy[4] House of Plantagenet Kingdom of England Principality of Wales Duchy of Aquitaine English Kingdom of France[5] Duchy of Burgundy County of Flanders County of Hainaut Duchy of Brittany[6] Kingdom of Portugal Kingdom of Navarre Papal States[7]Commanders and leaders Philip VI (1337–1350) John II (1350–1364) Charles V (1364–1380) Charles VI (1380–1422) Charles VII (1422–1453) Edward III
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