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Freemium
Freemium
Freemium
is a pricing strategy by which a product or service (typically a digital offering or application such as software, media, games or web services) is provided free of charge, but money (premium) is charged for additional features, services, or virtual goods.[1][2] "Freemium" is a portmanteau of "free" and "premium". The business model has been in use by software industry since the 1980s as a licensing scheme. A subset of this model used by the video game industry is called free-to-play.Contents1 Origin 2 Restrictions 3 Significance 4 Criticism of games 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingOrigin[edit] The business model has been in use for software since the 1980s. This is often in a time-limited or feature-limited version to promote a paid-for full version. The model is particularly suited to software as the cost of distribution is negligible
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Pay To Play
Pay to play, sometimes pay for play, is a phrase used for a variety of situations in which money is exchanged for services or the privilege to engage in certain activities. The common denominator of all forms of pay to play is that one must pay to "get in the game", with the sports analogy frequently arising.[1]Contents1 In broadcasting 2 In corporate finance 3 In engineering, design, and construction 4 In finance 5 In music 6 In online gaming 7 In politics 8 In sports 9 In stand-up comedy 10 In the visual arts 11 See also 12 ReferencesIn broadcasting[edit] Main article: Brokered programming The term also refers to a growing trend in which individuals or groups may purchase radio or television airtime, much like infomercials, to have their views heard on broadcast stations
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Early Access
Early access, also known as early funding, alpha-access, or paid-alpha, is a funding model in the video game industry by which consumers can pay for a game in the various development cycles (pre-alpha, alpha, beta) and obtain access to the pre-full release versions of the game, while the developer is able to use those funds to continue work on the game. Those that pay to participate typically help to debug the game, provide feedback and suggestions, and may have access to special materials in the game
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Microsoft Imagine
Microsoft
Microsoft
Imagine, formerly known as DreamSpark and MSDN-AA, is a Microsoft
Microsoft
program to provide students with software design and development tools at no charge. The program is available for university/college and K-12 students in more than 120 countries.[1] To register, students must visit the Microsoft
Microsoft
Imagine website and verify their identity through their verified .EDU institution
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PC World (magazine)
PC World, stylized PCWorld, is a global computer magazine published monthly by IDG.[2] Since 2013, it has been an online only publication. It offers advice on various aspects of PCs and related items, the Internet, and other personal technology products and services. In each publication, PC World
PC World
reviews and tests hardware and software products from a variety of manufacturers, as well as other technology related devices such as still and video cameras, audio devices and televisions. The current editor of PC World
PC World
is Jon Phillips, formerly of Wired. In August 2012, he replaced Steve Fox, who had been editorial director since the December 2008 issue of the magazine
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Anti-virus Software
Antivirus or anti-virus software (often abbreviated as AV), sometimes known as anti-malware software, is computer software used to prevent, detect and remove malicious software. Antivirus software
Antivirus software
was originally developed to detect and remove computer viruses, hence the name. However, with the proliferation of other kinds of malware, antivirus software started to provide protection from other computer threats
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ITunes
iTunes (/ˈaɪtjuːnz/ or /ˈaɪtuːnz/)[1] is a media player, media library, Internet radio
Internet radio
broadcaster, and mobile device management application developed by Apple Inc.
Apple Inc.
It was announced on January 9, 2001. It is used to play, download, and organize digital multimedia files, including music and video, on personal computers running the macOS and Windows
Windows
operating systems. Content must be purchased through the iTunes Store, whereas iTunes is the software letting users manage their purchases. The original and main focus of iTunes is music, with a library offering organization, collection, and storage of users' music collections. It can be used to rip songs from CDs, as well as play content with the use of dynamic, smart playlists. Options for sound optimizations exist, as well as ways to wirelessly share the iTunes library
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Microtransaction
Microtransaction (sometimes abbreviated as MTX) is a business model where users can purchase virtual goods via micropayments. Microtransactions are often used in free-to-play games to provide a revenue source for the developers. While microtransactions are a staple of the mobile app market, they are also available on traditional computer platforms such as Valve's Steam platform as well as console gaming. Free-to-play games that include a microtransaction model are sometimes referred to as "freemium". Another term, "pay-to-win," is sometimes used derogatorily to refer to games where buying items in-game can give a player advantage over others, particularly if the items cannot be obtained by free means
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Wired (magazine)
Wired is a monthly American magazine, published in print and online editions, that focuses on how emerging technologies affect culture, the economy, and politics. Owned by Condé Nast, it is headquartered in San Francisco, California, and has been in publication since March/April 1993.[2] Several spin-offs have been launched, including Wired UK, Wired Italia, Wired Japan, and Wired Germany. In its earliest colophons, Wired credited Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan
Marshall McLuhan
as its "patron saint." From its beginning, the strongest influence on the magazine's editorial outlook came from techno-utopian cofounder Stewart Brand
Stewart Brand
and his associate Kevin Kelly.[3] From 1998 to 2006, Wired magazine
Wired magazine
and Wired News
Wired News
(which publishes at Wired.com) had separate owners
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Steam (software)
Steam is a digital distribution platform developed by Valve Corporation, which offers digital rights management (DRM), multiplayer gaming, video streaming and social networking services. Steam provides the user with installation and automatic updating of games, and community features such as friends lists and groups, cloud saving, and in-game voice and chat functionality. The software provides a freely available application programming interface (API) called Steamworks, which developers can use to integrate many of Steam's functions into their products, including networking, matchmaking, in-game achievements, micro-transactions, and support for user-created content through Steam Workshop. Though initially developed for use on Microsoft Windows
Microsoft Windows
operating systems, versions for OS X
OS X
and Linux
Linux
were later released
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Valve Corporation
Valve Corporation
Valve Corporation
is an American video game developer and digital distribution company headquartered in Bellevue, Washington. The company is known for its software distribution platform Steam and the Half-Life, Counter-Strike, Portal, Day of Defeat, Team Fortress, Left 4 Dead, and Dota 2
Dota 2
games. Valve was founded in 1996 as a limited liability company by former Microsoft
Microsoft
employees Gabe Newell
Gabe Newell
and Mike Harrington. Their debut product, the PC first-person shooter Half-Life, was released in 1998 to critical acclaim and commercial success, after which Harrington left the company
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Tax Deduction
Tax
Tax
deduction is a reduction of income that is able to be taxed and is commonly a result of expenses, particularly those incurred to produce additional income
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Capcom
Capcom
Capcom
Co., Ltd. (Japanese: 株式会社カプコン, Hepburn: Kabushiki-gaisha Kapukon), or Capcom, is a Japanese video game developer and publisher[4] known for creating numerous multi-million selling game franchises, including Ace Attorney, Street Fighter, Mega Man, Resident Evil, Devil May Cry, Monster Hunter, and Dead Rising, as well as games based on the Disney animated properties. Established in 1979,[5] it has become an international enterprise with subsidiaries in North America, Europe, and East Asia.[6]Contents1 History 2 Corporate structure2.1 Development studios 2.2 Branches and subsidiaries 2.3 Game-related media3 Games3.1 Platinum Titles4 Criticism and controversy 5 Affiliated companies5.1 See also6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Capcom's predecessor, I.R.M Corporation, was founded on May 30, 1979[7] by Kenzo Tsujimoto. Tsujimoto was still president of Irem Corporation when he founded I.R.M
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The Smurfs (film)
The Smurfs
The Smurfs
is a 2011 American 3D live-action/computer-animated comedy film loosely based on the comic book series of the same name created by the Belgian comics artist Peyo. It was directed by Raja Gosnell and stars Hank Azaria, Neil Patrick Harris, Jayma Mays
Jayma Mays
and Sofía Vergara, with Jonathan Winters
Jonathan Winters
and Katy Perry
Katy Perry
as the voices of Papa Smurf and Smurfette
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Microtransactions
Microtransaction (sometimes abbreviated as MTX) is a business model where users can purchase virtual goods via micropayments. Microtransactions are often used in free-to-play games to provide a revenue source for the developers. While microtransactions are a staple of the mobile app market, they are also available on traditional computer platforms such as Valve's Steam platform as well as console gaming. Free-to-play games that include a microtransaction model are sometimes referred to as "freemium". Another term, "pay-to-win," is sometimes used derogatorily to refer to games where buying items in-game can give a player advantage over others, particularly if the items cannot be obtained by free means
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South Park
South Park
South Park
is an American adult animated sitcom created by Trey Parker and Matt Stone
Matt Stone
and developed by Brian Graden for the Comedy Central television network. The show revolves around four boys—Stan Marsh, Kyle Broflovski, Eric Cartman, and Kenny McCormick—and their bizarre adventures in and around the titular Colorado
Colorado
town. Much like The Simpsons, South Park
South Park
uses a very large ensemble cast of recurring characters and became infamous for its profanity and dark, surreal humor that satirizes a wide range of topics towards a mature audience. Parker and Stone developed the show from The Spirit of Christmas, two consecutive animated shorts created in 1992 and 1995. The latter became one of the first Internet viral videos, ultimately leading to South Park's production
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