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Free Radio Shropshire
Shropshire
Shropshire
(/ˈʃrɒpʃər, -ʃɪər/; alternatively Salop[3]; abbreviated, in print only, Shrops; demonym Salopian /səˈloʊpiən/ sə-LOH-pee-ən)[4] is a county in the West Midlands of England, bordering Wales
Wales
to the west, Cheshire
Cheshire
to the north, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
to the east, and Worcestershire
Worcestershire
and Herefordshire
Herefordshire
to the south. Shropshire Council
Shropshire Council
was created in 2009, a unitary authority taking over from the previous county council and five district councils
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Shropshire (other)
Shropshire
Shropshire
usually refers to the English county of Shropshire. It may also refer to: People[edit]Adonis Shropshire, American producer. Courtney Shropshire, the founder of Civitan International. Darrell Shropshire, an American football
American football
player Elmo Shropshire, a singer. Mike Shropshire, a sportswriter. Terilyn A
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Worcestershire
Worcestershire (/ˈwʊstərʃər/ ( listen) WUUS-tər-shər, /-ʃɪər/ -sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a county in the West Midlands of England. Between 1974 and 1998, it was merged with the neighbouring county of Herefordshire as Hereford and Worcester. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. Other major towns in the county include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The north-east of Worcestershire includes part of the industrial West Midlands; the rest of the county is largely rural
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West Mercia Police
West Mercia Police, formerly known as West Mercia Constabulary, is the territorial police force responsible for policing the counties of Herefordshire, Shropshire
Shropshire
(including Telford
Telford
and Wrekin) and Worcestershire
Worcestershire
in England. The force area covers 2,868 square miles (7,430 km2) making it the fourth largest police area in England and Wales
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Time Zone
A time zone is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Time
Time
zones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time. Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time
Time
(UTC) by a whole number of hours ( UTC−12
UTC−12
to UTC+14), but a few zones are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (e.g. Newfoundland Standard Time is UTC−03:30, Nepal
Nepal
Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:45, and Indian Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:30). Some higher latitude and temperate zone countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by adjusting local clock time by an hour
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Greenwich Mean Time
Greenwich
Greenwich
Mean Time
Time
(GMT) is the mean solar time at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London. GMT was formerly used as the international civil time standard, now superseded in that function by Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). Today GMT is considered equivalent to UTC for UK civil purposes (but this is not formalised) and for navigation is considered equivalent to UT1 (the modern form of mean solar time at 0° longitude); these two meanings can differ by up to 0.9 s
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Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(abbreviated DST), sometimes referred to as daylight savings time in US, Canadian and Australian speech,[1][2] and known as British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST) in the UK and just summer time in some countries, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time.[3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916
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British Summer Time
During British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST), civil time in the United Kingdom, Ireland
Ireland
and Portugal
Portugal
is advanced one hour forward of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) (in effect, changing the time zone from UTC+0 to UTC+1), so that evenings have more daylight and mornings have less.[1][2] BST begins at 01:00 GMT on the last Sunday of March and ends at 01:00 GMT (02:00 BST) on the last Sunday of October. Since 22 October 1995, the starting and finishing times of daylight saving time across the European Union
European Union
have been aligned[3] – for instance Central European Summer Time begins and ends on the same Sundays at exactly the same time (that is, 02:00 CET, which is 01:00 GMT)
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UTC+01
UTC+01:00, known simply as UTC+1, is a time offset that adds 1 hour to Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). This time is used in:Central European Time West Africa Time Western European Summer TimeBritish Summer Time Irish Standard TimeRomance Standard Time (Microsoft Windows Control panel) Swatch Internet Time EVE OnlineIn ISO 8601 the
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Wales
Wales
Wales
(/ˈweɪlz/ ( listen); Welsh: Cymru [ˈkəmri] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the island of Great Britain.[8] It is bordered by England
England
to the east, the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel
Bristol Channel
to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon
Snowdon
(Yr Wyddfa), its highest summit
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Cheshire
Cheshire
Cheshire
(/ˈtʃɛʃər/ CHESH-ər, /-ɪər/ -eer;[2] archaically the County Palatine of Chester)[3] is a county in North West England, bordering Merseyside
Merseyside
and Greater Manchester
Greater Manchester
to the north, Derbyshire to the east, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
and Shropshire
Shropshire
to the south and Flintshire, Wales
Wales
to the west. Cheshire's county town is Chester; the largest town is Warrington.[4] Other major towns include Congleton, Crewe, Ellesmere Port, Macclesfield, Northwich, Runcorn, Widnes, Wilmslow, and Winsford.[5][6] The county covers 905 square miles (2,344 km2) and has a population of around 1 million
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Herefordshire
Herefordshire
Herefordshire
(/ˈhɛrɪfərdʃər/) is a county in the West Midlands of England, governed by Herefordshire
Herefordshire
Council. It borders Shropshire to the north, Worcestershire
Worcestershire
to the east, Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
to the south-east, and the Welsh counties of Monmouthshire
Monmouthshire
and Powys
Powys
to the west. Hereford
Hereford
is a cathedral city and is the county town; with a population of approximately 55,800 inhabitants it is also the largest settlement. The county is one of the most rural and sparsely populated in England, with a population density of 82/km² (212/sq mi)
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Telford And Wrekin
Telford
Telford
and Wrekin is a unitary district with borough status in the West Midlands region of England. The district was created in 1974 as The Wrekin, then a non-metropolitan district of Shropshire. In 1998 the district became a unitary authority and was renamed Telford
Telford
and Wrekin. It remains part of the Shropshire
Shropshire
ceremonial county and shares institutions such as the Fire and Rescue Service and Community Health with the rest of Shropshire. The borough's major settlement is Telford, a new town designated in the 1960s incorporating the existing towns of Dawley, Madeley, Oakengates
Oakengates
and Wellington. The next largest population centre is Newport, a market town to the north of Telford. The borough borders Staffordshire, but is mostly surrounded by the non-metropolitan county of Shropshire, whose unitary authority is Shropshire
Shropshire
Council
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County Council
A county council is the elected administrative body governing an area known as a county. This term has slightly different meanings in different countries.Contents1 Ireland1.1 History1.1.1 1899–1922 1.1.2 1922 to present2 Taiwan2.1 Taiwan Province 2.2 Fujian Province3 United Kingdom3.1 England3.1.1 History 3.1.2 2009 reforms3.2 Northern Ireland 3.3 Scotland3.3.1 History3.4 Wales3.4.1 History4 United States 5 Other countries 6 ReferencesIreland[edit] The county councils created under British rule in 1899 continue to exist in Ireland, although they are now governed under legislation passed by Oireachtas Éireann, principally the Local Government Act 2001. History[edit] 1899–1922[edit] The Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898
Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898
introduced county councils to Ireland
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County Town
A county town in Great Britain
Great Britain
or Ireland
Ireland
is usually, but not always, the location of administrative or judicial functions within the county. The concept of a county town is ill-defined and unoffical. Following the establishment of County
County
Councils in 1889, the administrative headquarters of the new authorities were usually located in the county town of each county. However, this was not always the case and the idea of a "county town" pre-dates the establishment of these councils. For example, Lancaster is the county town of Lancashire
Lancashire
but the county council is located at Preston.. The county town was often where the county members of parliament were elected or where certain judicial functions were carried out, leading it to becoming established as the most important town in the county. Some county towns are no longer situated within the administrative county
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